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Not going to get into the debate of when to change it & what to use but I did a insane amount of research before I bought my Silverado about oil, changes, break-in, etc. since it was my first new truck & will be my last. I can tell you from my research as well as being on multiple different manufacturers forums & reading probably a hundred of these “oil debate” threads if your going to do your own changes you’ll want to keep very detailed logs. Dated receipts purchased from somewhere the oil and filter part numbers are on it & mileage recorded at the minimum.

Use whatever oil you feel comfortable with as long as it meets/exceeds Subarus requirements & recommended velocity. Just cause it costs more (AMSOIL) it ain’t necessarily better. If you want to do your own oil research most guys agree bobistheoilguy.com is the go to authority for oil info.

Definitely use a filter with the factory by-pass psi rating especially since the filter is a upside down one. GM actually changed their psi requirement for the K2 trucks/corvettes after production started in 2014 from 12/15 to 22 which caused all kinds of chaos as far as what filters should/could be used & wrong printed info but at the end of the day GM flat out told stealerships in the TSB to use the old ones they had on hand first before swapping to the higher psi filters. So keep up on any “changes” for future oil changes.

I contemplated doing a break-in change on the truck but ultimately decided not to as all my oil changes have been/will be done at the stealership for the first 5 years for warranty purposes. If I had decided to do my own on it I would have done a 1000 or 1500 miler kept the receipt till I did my first 5k change then played dumb like the 5k was my first one if I would have had a warranty claim. This Xtrek will be traded off in 3ish years so I didn’t even consider doing this.

I can tell you from my research there is no longer anything such as “break-in” lube or oil in these newer engines. This is because of the advancement in the machining process & tolerances. Years ago yes this was a thing when motors were assembled completely by hand. Today it might apply to factory high performance engines still completely hand built (AMG, GTR, etc) but not mass produced engines. This is not to say a manufacturer might include extra additives in the oil off the assembly line? Also as far as metal the amount in a new motor is minimum compared to the old V8 days I remember doing cam swaps in small blocks and the crap would run out the bottom silver in color from the lifters wearing to the cam lobes. First oil change was literally after the 30 minute break-in routine per instructions to retain warranty.

Since your planning on keeping it for a while might consider a regular oil analysis schedule after you get some miles on it. Like changes everybody does different intervals so make up your own mind if you want to do them & when. The info you get from these will help you determine what other services may need to be done & when. There’s several mail in labs if you don’t have any drop off ones near you. One popular one is Blackstone-labs. IMO the first one I might consider doing would be the last change before the warranty is up to give me a possible heads up of future problems & to consider extended change intervals.

Since your going to do your own services don’t forget the other recommended services like air filter, cabin filter, brake fluid, coolant, etc. I change both filters on everything I own once a year regardless of mileage. Cheap insurance IMO & cabin filters can get nasty dirty in no time flat.
 

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Not going to get into the debate of when to change it & what to use but I did a insane amount of research before I bought my Silverado about oil, changes, break-in, etc. since it was my first new truck & will be my last. I can tell you from my research as well as being on multiple different manufacturers forums & reading probably a hundred of these “oil debate” threads if your going to do your own changes you’ll want to keep very detailed logs. Dated receipts purchased from somewhere the oil and filter part numbers are on it & mileage recorded at the minimum.

Use whatever oil you feel comfortable with as long as it meets/exceeds Subarus requirements & recommended velocity. Just cause it costs more (AMSOIL) it ain’t necessarily better. If you want to do your own oil research most guys agree bobistheoilguy.com is the go to authority for oil info.

Definitely use a filter with the factory by-pass psi rating especially since the filter is a upside down one. GM actually changed their psi requirement for the K2 trucks/corvettes after production started in 2014 from 12/15 to 22 which caused all kinds of chaos as far as what filters should/could be used & wrong printed info but at the end of the day GM flat out told stealerships in the TSB to use the old ones they had on hand first before swapping to the higher psi filters. So keep up on any “changes” for future oil changes.

I contemplated doing a break-in change on the truck but ultimately decided not to as all my oil changes have been/will be done at the stealership for the first 5 years for warranty purposes. If I had decided to do my own on it I would have done a 1000 or 1500 miler kept the receipt till I did my first 5k change then played dumb like the 5k was my first one if I would have had a warranty claim. This Xtrek will be traded off in 3ish years so I didn’t even consider doing this.

I can tell you from my research there is no longer anything such as “break-in” lube or oil in these newer engines. This is because of the advancement in the machining process & tolerances. Years ago yes this was a thing when motors were assembled completely by hand. Today it might apply to factory high performance engines still completely hand built (AMG, GTR, etc) but not mass produced engines. This is not to say a manufacturer might include extra additives in the oil off the assembly line? Also as far as metal the amount in a new motor is minimum compared to the old V8 days I remember doing cam swaps in small blocks and the crap would run out the bottom silver in color from the lifters wearing to the cam lobes. First oil change was literally after the 30 minute break-in routine per instructions to retain warranty.

Since your planning on keeping it for a while might consider a regular oil analysis schedule after you get some miles on it. Like changes everybody does different intervals so make up your own mind if you want to do them & when. The info you get from these will help you determine what other services may need to be done & when. There’s several mail in labs if you don’t have any drop off ones near you. One popular one is Blackstone-labs. IMO the first one I might consider doing would be the last change before the warranty is up to give me a possible heads up of future problems & to consider extended change intervals.

Since your going to do your own services don’t forget the other recommended services like air filter, cabin filter, brake fluid, coolant, etc. I change both filters on everything I own once a year regardless of mileage. Cheap insurance IMO & cabin filters can get nasty dirty in no time flat.
I have done Blackstone oil testing on three cars bought new at various intervals including my crosstrek. at 10k mile all have said I could go longer between oil changes but I stick to 10k miles because I like round numbers.

my suggestion is do what makes you feel best. even if you are "wasting money".

I change my battery every three years and some people consider that a waste of money.
 

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Well, I also had that old school mentality as well, and changed mine at 1000 mile at the dealership, despite the tech saying it isn't necessary.

Since then, I've changed mine out with Mobile 1 synthetic 0W-20 at the recommended interval, but decided to keep it at 5000 mile interval due to oil looking pretty dark, and ease of remembering when I need to change it out.

Recently, I ran into some great pricing on Mobile1 10k miles extended synthetic oil and am testing it to see if it remains any clearer at the 5000 mile interval then the regular Mobile1 synthetic. If so, I plan to extend the interval a bit.
 

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Definitely use a filter with the factory by-pass psi rating especially since the filter is a upside down one. GM actually changed their psi requirement for the K2 trucks/corvettes after production started in 2014 from 12/15 to 22 which caused all kinds of chaos consider doing would be the last change before the warranty is up to give me a possible heads up of future problems & to consider extended change intervals.
95% of filters that spec subaru use don't "meet" those numbers. But manufactures (including Fram) are not going to recommend a filter that f's up your engine. They know one or two things about filters and engines.

For the record my 08 Forester never say a subaru filter it has 210K miles on it. My crosstrek and '18 Forester will only see the Fram Ultra 7317filter that filters down to 20 microns at 99=% whereas subaru's filters at 30+ microns. They keep engine oil visibly cleaner. To each his own.
 

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A yeah the only reason I say to use a Subaru spec filter during the warranty period is for potential warranty claims.
Outside the warranty period doesn’t really matter what you want to use.

That way “they” can’t claim the filters you used are to blame if it’s the same specs they use. I’m a GM guy & have seen first hand some stealerships blame any & everything they can to try to get out of doing warranty work. On the other hand have seen stealerships that couldn’t care less and will cover anything warranty related without blinking an eye.

Odds of a warranty claim denied over a filter are probably half a million to 1. But if you figure the average joe does 6 changes in the warranty period & a Subie spec filter is 3 bucks more that’s 20 bucks. So IMO that’s cheap insurance to not have to have to potentially fight with “them”.
 

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A yeah the only reason I say to use a Subaru spec filter during the warranty period is for potential warranty claims.
Outside the warranty period doesn’t really matter what you want to use.

That way “they” can’t claim the filters you used are to blame if it’s the same specs they use. I’m a GM guy & have seen first hand some stealerships blame any & everything they can to try to get out of doing warranty work. On the other hand have seen stealerships that couldn’t care less and will cover anything warranty related without blinking an eye.

Odds of a warranty claim denied over a filter are probably half a million to 1. But if you figure the average joe does 6 changes in the warranty period & a Subie spec filter is 3 bucks more that’s 20 bucks. So IMO that’s cheap insurance to not have to have to potentially fight with “them”.
i think comparing the warranty practices of ANY of the Japanese auto makers to ANY American car makers is an insult to the Japanese.

also if your car needs to be warrantied there's not going to be an audit of receipts for service. it's not a gotcha process. they'll fix it unless there are obvious signs of neglect or abuse.

with American car companies its a different story and you may have to join a class action lawsuit to get any relief.
 

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I would think that if new Subarus came with break-in oil, the first oil change would not be 6,000 miles or 6 months because one might have driven only 1,000 miles in 6 months.
 

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I would think that if new Subarus came with break-in oil, the first oil change would not be 6,000 miles or 6 months because one might have driven only 1,000 miles in 6 months.
Unfortunately for me, I'm a super-low mileage driver and just had my 6k or 6 mo whichever-comes-first oil change yesterday. At a whopping 1,700 miles. I actually checked the oil the day before and it looked like it was barely used. But I don't want to mess with the warranty, so it's cheap "insurance" to get it done at the specified intervals.
 

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I changed out the filter, but NOT the oil, on my new Trek at 500 miles on the assumption that the factory assembly area has a lot of "dirt" floating around and it's gotten into the engine's assembly and has probably clogged the filter by then. Then I change the filter again at 3000, and do a complete oil and filter change at 6000. I feel that the first 500 mile change gives me great peace-of-mind.
 

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Anyone know the difference between a flat tappet camshaft and a roller cam? Or when to use breakin lube?
Has anyone actually rebuilt an engine?
When the words " if you don't use x it will void your warranty" i get suspicious.
Its your money. Nothing wrong with changing out oil at 1000 miles if you like. Oil is cheap. Engines aren't. My 19 xtrek has 5 k on it and i noticed a strong smell of gas in the oil when i just changed my oil. Fuel dilution is not uncommon in gdi engines. Going 10k with a 20 weight on an mpi engine might be feasible, but a 20 weight oil subjected to fuel dilution AND going 10k oci is asking for trouble.
I switched to 0w-30 at 1500 miles. Was going to do oci at 5k but after the gas smell in the oil am thinking of just doing 3k oci with a 0-30.
Just my opinion. Take it for what its worth. Sorry if this sounded bad but sometimes it sounds like people think mechanics are magic.
 

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Anyone know the difference between a flat tappet camshaft and a roller cam? Or when to use breakin lube?
Has anyone actually rebuilt an engine?
When the words " if you don't use x it will void your warranty" i get suspicious.
Its your money. Nothing wrong with changing out oil at 1000 miles if you like. Oil is cheap. Engines aren't. My 19 xtrek has 5 k on it and i noticed a strong smell of gas in the oil when i just changed my oil. Fuel dilution is not uncommon in gdi engines. Going 10k with a 20 weight on an mpi engine might be feasible, but a 20 weight oil subjected to fuel dilution AND going 10k oci is asking for trouble.
I switched to 0w-30 at 1500 miles. Was going to do oci at 5k but after the gas smell in the oil am thinking of just doing 3k oci with a 0-30.
Just my opinion. Take it for what its worth. Sorry if this sounded bad but sometimes it sounds like people think mechanics are magic.
I can't speak for others here, and agree that you don't have to use, say, a Subaru filter or have a dealer do the oil change to maintain the warranty. However, as with so many topics here that get flogged to death, I get suspicious when someone says you don't have to do what the manual says to do or not to do, or worse when they say it's better to the opposite of what the manual says. To me, it means they think they know better than the Subaru engineers...
 

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In my case it doesn't have anything to do with "knowing more than the engineers". It's deciding what's best for my car. It is, after all, my car. Not Subaru's. Decisions are made by car manufacturers that have their best interests in mind. Not yours or mine. I've said before, manufacturers only care about getting out of the warranty period. After that, it's your problem.
 

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In my case it doesn't have anything to do with "knowing more than the engineers". It's deciding what's best for my car. It is, after all, my car. Not Subaru's. Decisions are made by car manufacturers that have their best interests in mind. Not yours or mine. I've said before, manufacturers only care about getting out of the warranty period. After that, it's your problem.
I agree that it's your car to do with as you wish (assuming you bought it, not leased it). I also agree that car manufacturers usually have their best interests in mind, although, keeping in mind the end users interests often builds brand loyalty and is better for business long term.

What I don't get is that, if it were better for the car to change the oil at 1K, how does corporate Subaru benefit from telling you that you don't need to change it until 6 months or 6K miles? This doesn't get them out of the warranty period any quicker. Quite the opposite - if it's worse on engines to leave that factory oil in there for the full 6 months and 6K miles then they would have more engine failures during the warranty period.
 

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In my case it doesn't have anything to do with "knowing more than the engineers". It's deciding what's best for my car. It is, after all, my car. Not Subaru's. Decisions are made by car manufacturers that have their best interests in mind. Not yours or mine. I've said before, manufacturers only care about getting out of the warranty period. After that, it's your problem.
I disagree. Subaru takes great pride and uses it as a huge marketing point that 97% of Subarus are still on the road after 10 years. If Subarus were clunking out after 3 years, it'd be a huge marketing and sales mess for the company. In fact, that would be a huge problem for any company. Nobody would buy a car if they knew it was going to [email protected]# after 3 years. If anything, auto companies are going to be on the conservative side regarding warranty (and post-warranty) maintenance intervals in order to do everything possible build up their long-term durability numbers. That's more important than short-term sales numbers.

You can do whatever you want re: maintenance, oil type, etc., but if you deviate from what the warranty says during the warranty period, you may end up SOL if you have an issue.
 

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I do trust Subaru's engineers and agree their maintenance schedules are more than reasonable. And i do plan on doing the other recommended services. It's the bean counters i don't trust. Subaru has to balance quality (their AWD systems are outstanding) with government regulations in each country. Everywhere but north america uses a 30 weight oil. The US has their cafe standards which looks like is forcing 20 weight oil (which i don't mind and use in my other non gdi cars) along with 16 weight in some other makes and the wonderful auto start stop feature. Subaru's jatco cvt trannys are horrible (my nephew has rebuilt many cvts in the ascents) but probably cheaper than Toyota's outstanding cvts. I guess what I'm saying is anyone is perfectly correct in strictly following Subaru's oci and maintenance schedules. Changing the oci to 3k or 5k will not harm the engine in the least. It costs me like 35 bucks to do an oil change. If you have to pay 70 to 90 bucks i can see why doing it more often would seem like a waste of money.
 

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I do trust Subaru's engineers and agree their maintenance schedules are more than reasonable. And i do plan on doing the other recommended services. It's the bean counters i don't trust. Subaru has to balance quality (their AWD systems are outstanding) with government regulations in each country. Everywhere but north america uses a 30 weight oil. The US has their cafe standards which looks like is forcing 20 weight oil (which i don't mind and use in my other non gdi cars) along with 16 weight in some other makes and the wonderful auto start stop feature. Subaru's jatco cvt trannys are horrible (my nephew has rebuilt many cvts in the ascents) but probably cheaper than Toyota's outstanding cvts. I guess what I'm saying is anyone is perfectly correct in strictly following Subaru's oci and maintenance schedules. Changing the oci to 3k or 5k will not harm the engine in the least. It costs me like 35 bucks to do an oil change. If you have to pay 70 to 90 bucks i can see why doing it more often would seem like a waste of money.
I agree and will probably be switching to 30W at some point.

The OP brought up changing the oil at 1K miles and I question why anyone who is concerned about the warranty would not follow the recommendations in the manual (i.e. first change at 6mo or 6K mi....
 

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Subaru's jatco cvt trannys are horrible (my nephew has rebuilt many cvts in the ascents) but probably cheaper than Toyota's outstanding cvts.
According to Car and Driver:
"Audi, Honda, Hyundai, Subaru, and Toyota all make their own CVTs. Nissan owns a controlling interest in JATCO, the firm that supplies 49 percent of the world’s gear-free transmissions to Chrysler, GM, Mitsubishi, and Suzuki. In addition, nearly half of Nissan’s current U.S. models offer a JATCO-supplied CVT."
 

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The only data I could find is Consumer Reports Reliability data on "Major Transmission" and "Minor Tranmission" problems in Crosstreks (Consumer Reports, April 2020 "Auto Issue"). The data shown seems to indicate that the Subaru CVT (the majority of the sampled cars) is pretty reliable over the production run. The Nissan (presumably the JATCO) CVT had problems in early years and seems equally reliable now. Toyota CVTs appear to be approximately equal to or better than the reliability of the Subaru over the years of production. I generally don't notice that I have a CVT. I thought it might whine but it hasn't in my experience. Generally speaking the data don't seem to show any major differences between CVTs and others. Mechanics have their own views on stuff but I don't see the Subaru CVT as being a major source of complaints in the NHTSA either.
 

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Stop over servicing the car. Just follow the manufacturer's instructions and specifications for servicing and use genuine parts. Those, and using a VAT registered garage here in Europe will guarantee the manufacturers warranty is maintained.

Departing from the manufacturer's servicing regime will guarantee that Subaru will leave you in the gutter if you need any work done under the warranty.
 
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