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Discussion Starter #1
I put a Curt 2" receiver trailer hitch on my Crosstrek. I am using it for a bike rack and plan on towing a camper with it. The curt specs say:

Weight Carrying Capacity
Gross Towing Weight (GTW): 3,500 lbs.
Tongue Weight (TW): 525 lbs.

Subaru says:

max trailer weight with trailer brakes 1500 lbs,
max trailer weight without trailer brakes 1000 lbs.
200 lb tongue weight

I think the Subaru specs are based on the Subaru branded 1.25" receiver hitch, not a 2" receiver.

Can I really tow 3500 lbs? What weight/types of trailers have others towed? With electric brakes or without? Pix if you got em!
 

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You can't tow 3500 lbs your hitch can. You can follow the minimum of your hitch capacity and your vehicles capacity. In this case, Subaru recommends less than your hitch can take, so follow their advice.
 

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I may be wrong on this, but I thought the 1500 rating was for the hitch as well as the car? Any higher than 1500 on the crosstrek seems like it would put strain on the transmission as well as the unibody frame.

Anyways I tow a small sailboat (800 ish lbs) and my 2 bikes
 

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From one who has towed for many years...
What the XV can safely tow is based on the vehicle and the manufacturers rating, NOT what the hitch is rated at. This takes into consideration the engine, tranny, and brakes.
Towing anything up to the 1000 lb rating (without brake system) would seriously over tax the XV brakes in a panic/emergency stop. Even with a brake system, 1500 lb is realistic.
Many probably tow more, and you could probably kick in a few hundred lbs and still run ok.
Grumpaw
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The US tow ratings for the car is different than what is quoted around the world. Typically, in other geographical regions, the towing capacity is much higher for the SAME car. I think it has more to do with lawyers and regulations than the actual capacity of the car itself.

See - http://www.subaruxvforum.com/forum/subaru-xv-general-discussion-forum/40210-why-xv-towing-capacity-lower-u-s.html
Thanks for the info. That thread started to get silly without a real definitive answer. Is there a difference in the vehicle mechanics between US and Overseas versions? What are the Canadian towing specs?
Basically I am looking to tow a 1000 lb. to 1600 lb. tent camper + maybe another 4 to 5 hundred pounds of gear loaded in the camper. I want to be able to do this 2 maybe 3 times a year 500 miles round trip each time.
 
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No mechanical differences between US and Canadian models other than some trim options which aren't available in the US like HID headlights, being able to get a sunroof regardless of transmission types...

Subaru Canada typically mirrors the US specs as the two markets are so close together therefore, the towing specs in Canada are the same as the US - 1,500 lbs.

The Australians on the forum would probably be able to offer more information on towing as they typically do a lot of towing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As far as I can tell there are no mechanical differences between the Australian Crosstrek and the US Crosstrek Brakes included.

The Australian towing specs are:
With trailer brakes 1400kg (3086lbs.)
Without trailer brakes 650kg (1433lbs.)

So other than the US "lawyers and regulations" I see no difference?

I would love to have some Australian XV owners chime in!
 

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I'm an Aussie XV owner that tows stuff... I've had a subaru tow bar on mine for a while now and I was really surprised at how well this little car tows. She tows beautifully!

I'm glad we've got the heavier towing capacity here. I usually tow my teardrop camper but recently I towed a horse float.
ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1463803612.306954.jpg ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1463803640.531104.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm an Aussie XV owner that tows stuff... I've had a subaru tow bar on mine for a while now and I was really surprised at how well this little car tows. She tows beautifully!

I'm glad we've got the heavier towing capacity here. I usually tow my teardrop camper but recently I towed a horse float.
View attachment 185281 View attachment 185289
Thanks DebsXV for your response and pictures! Do you know the weight of the trailers you were towing? Did they have electric brakes?
 

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I'm an Aussie XV owner that tows stuff... I've had a subaru tow bar on mine for a while now and I was really surprised at how well this little car tows. She tows beautifully!

I'm glad we've got the heavier towing capacity here. I usually tow my teardrop camper but recently I towed a horse float.
View attachment 185281 View attachment 185289
Like I said, the Aussies tow more stuff than us North Americans.... :)
 

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Thanks DebsXV for your response and pictures! Do you know the weight of the trailers you were towing? Did they have electric brakes?
No I am not sure of the weight, but both of those are not heavy enough to legally require brakes. Plus I didn't tow my big fat heavy horse, just the empty float.
 

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I found this article a while back: Tow me down!

It's a long one but the summary is towing safely isn't as simple as it seems. In the UK, for example, as compared to the US, you're required to have a lower tongue weight, hence more weight centered on the trailer. This combined with a lower towing speed limit equals more stability and the ability to tow heavier loads. In the US, tongue weights are higher as are speed limits (I've never really seen specific speed limits for vehicles with trailers, at least in my travels). To handle this you need a bigger (heavier) vehicle.
 
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But that just means that the regulations need to be updated to account for some of the variances... example - the North American number of 1,500 lbs which I assume follows the North American 'standard' which I doubt most people on the road knows what the 1,500 pertains to or the speed that it should be good for. Without the circumstances around the number, 1,500 lbs is just a number.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So if you just use common sense you should be able to tow closer to the Australian specs. Reduce speed and tow responsibly. Is that what I am hearing?
 

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So if you just use common sense you should be able to tow closer to the Australian specs. Reduce speed and tow responsibly. Is that what I am hearing?
I can't see why you physically couldn't tow to the same specs as Aussies...it's the same vehicle.
BUT legally, would you?
If you were involved in an accident I doubt very much if an insurance company would pay up if they found you were breaking the law.
 

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So if you just use common sense you should be able to tow closer to the Australian specs. Reduce speed and tow responsibly. Is that what I am hearing?
Yes! That's exactly what I read... although there may be liability issues if you're towing a 3000lb trailer and get into an accident... even if it's not your fault and you were doing it 100% safely (trailer with brakes, hooked up properly, going 55 in the left lane with your flashers on, etc). Perhaps I'm a bit jaded... but where I work we get sued for everything no matter if it's our fault or not.
 
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