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Hey all,

Planning a little camping trip with a mate next month and trying to get a list of items that I "NEED" and not necessarily want. LOL

I currently have fitted LP Aventure bash plates fitted to my bar guard.

What I plan to get is:

  • Snatch strap rated to 6000kg or more with appropriate D shackles.
  • foldable shovel
  • 12V compressor and tyre deflator (50LPM minimum)
  • recovery tracks
  • UHF CB handheld radio
My question is, will a 1W unit be sufficient to use in convoy with others or am I better off using a 2W unit? I am looking at portable handheld radios btw not fixed in dash units.

What else do I NEED for use in intermediate terrain like mud, steep (unsealed) hills and sandy tracks?

Has anyone fitted proper chassis mounted recovery points to their XV's? I don't have a tow hitch but plan to. Should I get it fitted sooner and look at a recovery hitch adapter?

My experience off road is limited but I plan on doing more excursions to build up my experience.

Any constructive advice would be appreciated.
 

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I'm hardly an expert but a 1 watt UHF unit should have around 3-5km range, depending on the environment.

In lieu of a hitch and shackle (which I think is what you call a recovery hitch adapter), you may consider a long and heavier rated snatch (recovery/tow) strap than you've already considered. You can wrap around your wheel to carefully winch yourself. Make no mistake, this can be dangerous but if the wheel isn't angled and your strap is a damn good one, it's a great option. Google it for videos. Would I do it? If I had to, I would.

Here's what I carry and, in CDN $, it's cheap.

300408


I know the XV is heavier than the rating but assumming I had someone to keep applying gas or to crank it, I also picked up one of these and keep it in my cargo area along with some lag bolts and a driver.

300410



You may want to consider a:
tyre puncture repair kit;
good set of gloves for dirt, scrub, emergency procedures;
small mechanics tool set, specific to XV (10mm socket, wrench, needle nose and linemans pliers, phillips and flat driver, etc);
electircal tape (in case wiring needs to be repaired - extra wire optional as theres usually a little stretch);
fire starter equipment (just in case);
something to protect yourself in bad weather (nbasically a rain poncho or similar); and
some high calorie snacks to keep energy up if you need to recover.

Hope that helps and that more experienced off roaders can add more or better refine what I typed.
 

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Lets start with uhf and cb are totally different radios. uhf is pretty much line of sight and will go a long distance the if 2 antennas can see each other. I would therefore recommendthat you use FRS radios ( uhf ) and mag mount antennas on the roof of the vehicle. Radios can be had for $50 or less and antennas for $20 or less most FRS radios have a high and low power setting something like 1watt and 5 watts.
 

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Lets start with uhf and cb are totally different radios. uhf is pretty much line of sight and will go a long distance the if 2 antennas can see each other. I would therefore recommendthat you use FRS radios ( uhf ) and mag mount antennas on the roof of the vehicle. Radios can be had for $50 or less and antennas for $20 or less most FRS radios have a high and low power setting something like 1watt and 5 watts.
I didnt know either but AUS has a UHF CB.

"UHF CB is a class-licensed citizen's band radio service authorised by the governments of Australia, New Zealand, Vanuatu, and Malaysia in the UHF 477 MHz band.[1] UHF CB provides 77 channels, including 32 channels (16 output, 16 input) allocated to repeater stations. It is similar in concept to 27 MHz CB Radio in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. "

"Repeaters are on channels 1–8 and 41–48 and the duplex button should be pressed to access the repeater.[4] "

No idea where the repeaters are but there ya go :)
 

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I've been tempted to get a ham license here, more often during emergencies like wildfires and earthquakes. One of my friends in the building, who has since left, was much more of a geek than I, and he installed an antenna on the roof. He could talk to his wife anywhere in the Los Angeles basin. That's impressive.

We have Motorola walkie-talkies and they work well when we're hiking and out of mobile phone coverage.
 

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I've been tempted to get a ham license here, more often during emergencies like wildfires and earthquakes. One of my friends in the building, who has since left, was much more of a geek than I, and he installed an antenna on the roof. He could talk to his wife anywhere in the Los Angeles basin. That's impressive.

We have Motorola walkie-talkies and they work well when we're hiking and out of mobile phone coverage.
I have a Yaesu handheld. A great place to start figuring it out is at the Ham Radio Outlet in Burbank. Worth a visit to the ARRL club near you . KI6VLI. Over the years I depend more and more on my cell phone, but used my hand held is some odd places (Ecuador?) and occasionally listen on the long trips on I5 to LA. Handhelds are pretty weak but if you have access to a repeater it works really well. Magnetic mount antenna scratched the roof of the Corolla though.
 

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I've been licensed since 1986 great hobby I was on the road alot and used vhf and uhf all the time, Haven't kept up with all the latest things in the hobby. The Chinese have come out with hand held radios that do digital transmissions as well as vhf and uhf for under $100. Digital will get you almost any place in the world that has internet and a hot spot. Yes mag mounts can scratch if you slide them off but who really sees the roof .
 
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