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I purchased a set of 4 Blizzak snow tires mounted on steel rims for my 14 XV Crosstrek. I opted out of having TPMS sensors installed due to the unreasonable price, plus the added expense of having them programmed. Other than having the tire pressure warning light on all the time, is there any problem that might arise from driving without the sensors? I’ve been doing this for years with my wife’s Honda CRV without any issues. I just wanted to make sure it won’t be a problem for the Crosstrek. Thanks for any insight you can offer!
 

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I don't know of any issues for the Crosstrek without having the TPMS on the wheels. Other than not getting a heads up of a pressure issue. Checking tire pressure's regularly will prevent that of course. I'm glad we here in Canada don't have TPMS on Subaru's. (y)
 

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The only issue is you have to live with the TPMS light being on, you soon learn to ignore it or as others have posted on this site , a piece of black tape stuck over the TPMS light does the job
 

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I too thought that the cost of the TPMS is a lot but I got them for a few reasons.First of course is that I want the light to be on when it's supposed to be on and off when it's supposed to be off.Second is that you can check your pressure every time you get in the car and it will not prevent tire pressure issues.Why not? Because punctures happen when driving and not when parked.The sensor will tell you when you have a tire going down before you can feel it and long before you reach your next destination where you can then and only then check your pressures again.That's if you make it that far.Third is that I plan to get a machine to allow me to do anything I need to with the sensors as well as save the new codes to the cars ECU.With this machine I can get data from the sensors such as battery life as well as the pressures.This will come in handy when checking pressures,especially in the winter,because I just have to hold the machine near the valve stem and push a button.I won't have to freeze my fingers off as I have in the past when getting the caps on and off and getting a good reading from a conventional pressure gauge.
 

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Having had massive tire-failing punctures on the road both with and without TPMS, the only appreciable difference is that with TPMS, my dashboard lit up before the tire became obviously flat and I had to pull over. Every other puncture that wasn't a catastrophic immediate failure, with and without TPMS, did not manifest until after I had parked the car. There may have been a slow leak, but TPMS didn't pick it up while the car was operating and 8 or 9 hours later when I got back to the car...flat tire. Realistically TPMS isn't telling you anything you either can't visually see for yourself before you get in the car, and isn't telling you there's a problem you can't feel when a tire has a catastrophic blowout at speed and loses all pressure. It's nice to have but if you spend the extra minute to walk around your car to visually look at your tires before driving off, or check your tire pressure once a week or so manually...you'll be fine. Just like everyone was fine 15 years ago, before TPMS became a mainstream thing.

Think of it this way - say you get a slow leak on the road, and TPMS actually notifies you about it before you reach your destination. What's the end result going to be? You're gonna pull over and change the tire (or call roadside assistance and make them earn that money you send them every month). Is that end result going to be any different if you don't have TPMS, and you get to your destination with an obviously low tire? ....no, not really. You're still changing the tire.

YMMV, and while I don't mind having TPMS...it's not something I'll miss if it goes away.
 

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I felt the same with all other posters here regarding the outrageous price of the TPMS and the unnecessary spoiled fact of it, as we've lived without it for decades...

However, I've purchased New? TPMS (OEM) on Ebay and installed them on my OEM 16" Impreza tires I've purchased on Craigslist and they've been great through my 3 years in Germany and still kicking to total almost 5 years!! And the price for them were less than $100 for all 4! Can't beat that fo sho!

In my humble opinion, TPMS is a peace of mind and a lazy convenience that makes up for the common sensible generation of "check your tire pressure before you head out"
 

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Ummm... correction... the "16" Impreza tires" weren't tires, but rims and I bought Blizzaks and TPMS which I've installed on that 16" OEM rims... FYI, I still have that setup despite living in Dallas, and will not give them up!
 

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I felt the same with all other posters here regarding the outrageous price of the TPMS and the unnecessary spoiled fact of it, as we've lived without it for decades...

In my humble opinion, TPMS is a peace of mind and a lazy convenience that makes up for the common sensible generation of "check your tire pressure before you head out"
Oh really?Do you check your pressure every time before you leave for your next destination?I would bet the answer is no.Checking your pressure before you leave will do you a lot of good when you run over that nail on the interstate many miles from home.Punctures happen when the car is being driven and not when parked.If the tire went flat after being parked and neither you nor the sensor could tell it was going flat while you were driving then you got lucky and the puncture happened shortly before you reached your destination.What would have happened if you had hit that same hazard right after you left?You would have been left along side the road changing a tire,possibly in a bad/dangerous place,that's what.Checking your pressure before you left would have done nothing but wasted your time.

The bottom line is this.Midway through a long trip,I get a puncture which will force me to stop and change it in just a few minutes.If I have the sensors checking my pressures on the fly and I have you waiting,many miles away,at my next destination to check my pressures again.Which method will be the first to tell me that I have a tire going down and allow me to find a safe place to change that tire?You do the math.
 

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I guess for me the bottom line is this. Technology is great. I just don't like a government telling me I have to have said technology and them making me pay for it in a form of tax. In Canada there is no law that says manufacturers have to have TPMS on their products. Most do, Subaru excluded. Then the government(Federal)adds a $100 tax on the purchase price. They also do it with N2 in tires charging another $100 in tax. Subaru drank the cool aid on that one. Bottom line. Anything that makes driving safer is good. And the government will make sure they use it to fill their piggy banks. And yes. I'm one of those nut bars that checks tire pressures once a week. 🤪 (y):eek:
 

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Oh really?Do you check your pressure every time before you leave for your next destination?I would bet the answer is no.Checking your pressure before you leave will do you a lot of good when you run over that nail on the interstate many miles from home.Punctures happen when the car is being driven and not when parked.If the tire went flat after being parked and neither you nor the sensor could tell it was going flat while you were driving then you got lucky and the puncture happened shortly before you reached your destination.What would have happened if you had hit that same hazard right after you left?You would have been left along side the road changing a tire,possibly in a bad/dangerous place,that's what.Checking your pressure before you left would have done nothing but wasted your time.

The bottom line is this.Midway through a long trip,I get a puncture which will force me to stop and change it in just a few minutes.If I have the sensors checking my pressures on the fly and I have you waiting,many miles away,at my next destination to check my pressures again.Which method will be the first to tell me that I have a tire going down and allow me to find a safe place to change that tire?You do the math.
You seem to be passionately against the TPMS which is odd. As with all technologies, it is a convenience and an added safety feature, but is not an 'answer all solve all' miracle piece of tech as there are countless possibilities where Murphy's Law can be applied.

To reply to your comment of "Checking your pressure before you left would have done nothing but wasted your time", that is something common sensible people used to do as a precautionary measure before the TPMS and before a road trip. I instinctively check my tires visually several times a day and even before my morning commute. I guess being in Military, I am accustomed to the old school PCMS process which is good habit to practice as a slow leak attained during a recent drive could've very well caused a slow leak. Practicing safety is NEVER a waste of time.
 

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You seem to be passionately against the TPMS which is odd. As with all technologies, it is a convenience and an added safety feature, but is not an 'answer all solve all' miracle piece of tech as there are countless possibilities where Murphy's Law can be applied.

To reply to your comment of "Checking your pressure before you left would have done nothing but wasted your time", that is something common sensible people used to do as a precautionary measure before the TPMS and before a road trip. I instinctively check my tires visually several times a day and even before my morning commute. I guess being in Military, I am accustomed to the old school PCMS process which is good habit to practice as a slow leak attained during a recent drive could've very well caused a slow leak. Practicing safety is NEVER a waste of time.
I seem to be against the TPMS?What ever gave you that idea?I'm all for it.Yes,you should check your pressure before leaving on a road trip is common sense.A visual inspection several times a day is just plain silly and again is a waste of time.Sounds like your time in the service has made you a bit paranoid.I would think that they would have trained you better in that you can't tell what the pressure is by looking at it.It can be down a good 10 pounds and you wouldn't be able to tell by looking at it.Because you can't tell by looking at it,you will then set out on a low tire that's getting lower by the minute and you will never know it until it hinders your ability to control the vehicle.Even using a gauge to check pressure before you leave will only tell you if you ran over something the last time you were out.Again,punctures happen when your driving and not while you are parked.Checking before you leave will not prevent a puncture nor will you be able to tell have one until it effects your ability to control the vehicle or until you reach your next destination.If you get that far.The TPMS will tell you when you get a puncture while you are still driving so you can do something about it before it effects your ability to control the vehicle.

I am a firm believer that there's no such thing as being too safe.I have a cousin with his own race team and 3 consecutive championships under his belt.I also have a 2nd cousin who's an up and comer at the local short tracks.They have always used TPMS and more than once it has alerted them that a tire is going down before they could feel it.This early warning allowed them to get to the pits and get it changed before they crashed the car.It also reduced time lost because if they had to wait until they could feel it then they would have to slow down and continue at reduced speed until they could make it back to the pits.That's if they made it back without crashing.

The bottom line is that sure,"it's no answer all solve all miracle piece of tech".It won't keep you safe in every scenareo and nothing will.However,any advanced warning is safer than no warning at all.So,to be as safe as you can be,for those around you as well,if you have TPMS on your car then use it like you are supposed to.In the imortal words of James Dean"the life you save could be mine".
 

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I felt the same with all other posters here regarding the outrageous price of the TPMS and the unnecessary spoiled fact of it, as we've lived without it for decades...

However, I've purchased New? TPMS (OEM) on Ebay and installed them on my OEM 16" Impreza tires I've purchased on Craigslist and they've been great through my 3 years in Germany and still kicking to total almost 5 years!! And the price for them were less than $100 for all 4! Can't beat that fo sho!

In my humble opinion, TPMS is a peace of mind and a lazy convenience that makes up for the common sensible generation of "check your tire pressure before you head out"
What year did you purchase these for? I have an 09 and a 10 Impreza that are rocking the TPMS lites and for $150/each it is not worth it. Thanks
 

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Here in Europe TPMS is a legal requirement for cars registered after 2010. Having had a puncture in each of my Toyotas and being told that by the TPMS I thought it useful but not life changing. I've previously had a Jeep Patriot 2.2d and was forever having problems with the unreliable electrics; the TPMS system amongst them.

Fast forward to my Renault Duster hire car here in Saudi, I've had loads of punctures (working between construction sites) and I've spotted them all before the tyre goes flat. Repair at the local petrol station is easy.

I've come to the conclusion that TPMS is useful but not essential. Would anyone agree?
 

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Here in Europe TPMS is a legal requirement for cars registered after 2010. Having had a puncture in each of my Toyotas and being told that by the TPMS I thought it useful but not life changing. I've previously had a Jeep Patriot 2.2d and was forever having problems with the unreliable electrics; the TPMS system amongst them.

Fast forward to my Renault Duster hire car here in Saudi, I've had loads of punctures (working between construction sites) and I've spotted them all before the tyre goes flat. Repair at the local petrol station is easy.

I've come to the conclusion that TPMS is useful but not essential. Would anyone agree?
No,it's not essential.However,neither is mirrors,seat belts,air bags,power steering,power brakes,headlights,tail lights,turn signals and safety glass windshields.Any car can get from point A to point B without them.Like TPMS,they all make driving safer.Would you want to drive a car without these nonessential features?I didn't think so.

The use of TPMS goes beyond just telling you a tire is flat or going flat.It makes checking your tire pressure so much faster and easier.And with being accurate to within 0.1 Lbs,it's it's much more precise than your typical pressure gauge.

I just received my Autel TS508 2 days ago and it makes me WANT to check my pressures.I can check all 4 tires in less time than it takes you to check 2 with a standard pressure gauge.During cold Michigan winters,it makes checking pressures so much more pleasant as well.Gloves make manipulating the valve caps near impossible so you have to work bare handed.By the time you've checked the 2nd tire,you can't feel your fingers which makes installing the valve caps very difficult.Handling the gauge and getting an accurate reading doesn't get any easier either.With the TS508,with my gloves on,I can check the pressures by just pointing the device at the valve stem and pushing a button.I found that when you choose to test all 4,it will save the results in a file for your log and you can add details about conditions during the test for future reference.

The speed,ease and convenience of checking tire pressures that TPMS provides,makes me want to put my extra set of 433 Mhz sensors that won't work with my '16 Crosstrek into my non TPMS '92 Mercury Capri convertible.
 

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What year did you purchase these for? I have an 09 and a 10 Impreza that are rocking the TPMS lites and for $150/each it is not worth it. Thanks
My Crosstrek is 2015 model, and I've purchased the TPMS on Ebay back in 2015... so I am unable to go back that far to see which vendor I've purchased them from. However, when I punched in Subaru Crosstrek TPMS, I see OEM brand new ones selling for $78 from Subarupartsdirect which is a reputable dealer who I've purchased many OEM items from, but other compatibles (non OEM) selling for apprx $70 for 4 TPMS.

My TPMS purchased on Ebay was OEM and supposedly new, and it is still fully functional at such a nominal price of less than $100 total that I've paid for. Not to mention, since I was getting that setup ready for my Germany assignment and with the European regulations of TPMS light being a "no no", I had no choice but to get them installed on my winter tires.
 

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I seem to be against the TPMS?What ever gave you that idea?I'm all for it.Yes,you should check your pressure before leaving on a road trip is common sense.A visual inspection several times a day is just plain silly and again is a waste of time.Sounds like your time in the service has made you a bit paranoid.I would think that they would have trained you better in that you can't tell what the pressure is by looking at it.It can be down a good 10 pounds and you wouldn't be able to tell by looking at it.Because you can't tell by looking at it,you will then set out on a low tire that's getting lower by the minute and you will never know it until it hinders your ability to control the vehicle.Even using a gauge to check pressure before you leave will only tell you if you ran over something the last time you were out.Again,punctures happen when your driving and not while you are parked.Checking before you leave will not prevent a puncture nor will you be able to tell have one until it effects your ability to control the vehicle or until you reach your next destination.If you get that far.The TPMS will tell you when you get a puncture while you are still driving so you can do something about it before it effects your ability to control the vehicle.

I am a firm believer that there's no such thing as being too safe.I have a cousin with his own race team and 3 consecutive championships under his belt.I also have a 2nd cousin who's an up and comer at the local short tracks.They have always used TPMS and more than once it has alerted them that a tire is going down before they could feel it.This early warning allowed them to get to the pits and get it changed before they crashed the car.It also reduced time lost because if they had to wait until they could feel it then they would have to slow down and continue at reduced speed until they could make it back to the pits.That's if they made it back without crashing.

The bottom line is that sure,"it's no answer all solve all miracle piece of tech".It won't keep you safe in every scenareo and nothing will.However,any advanced warning is safer than no warning at all.So,to be as safe as you can be,for those around you as well,if you have TPMS on your car then use it like you are supposed to.In the imortal words of James Dean"the life you save could be mine".
For the sake of all Veterans and currently serving Armed Forces service members who suffer from PTSD or some form of paranoia, your statement of "Sounds like your time in the service has made you a bit paranoid" is harshly inconsiderate and disrespectful. Please do not make such a comment in the future especially to us Veterans.

"I would think that they would have trained you better in that you can't tell what the pressure is by looking at it" Again, being inconsiderate and insulting with your Military Service related remark.... What gives you the right and the authority to sling insults and disrespect Military Service members?

For your clarification and reference, even in this 21st Century tech savvy times that we live in, HMMWV which are the most used light utility vehicle in all branches of Military, does not have the TPMS, so need to conduct PCMS before every mission is crucial. And during the mission, one would conduct a visual inspection. Now are they trained to inspect a 5lb drop in pressure? Of course not, visual inspection is just that VISUAL to assess functionality.

What you called "paranoid" is what I call a "habitual visual safety inspection" and believe me, it doesn't take but a couple of seconds for me to look over my tires as I approach the vehicle, so it is not silly nor a waste of time, as such a habit has saved my arse from slow leaks and tire issues in tactical military vehicles as well as my personal vehicles in the past.

Stop being disrespectful and stick to the topic without imposing your ways and inserting your emotions.
 

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For the sake of all Veterans and currently serving Armed Forces service members who suffer from PTSD or some form of paranoia, your statement of "Sounds like your time in the service has made you a bit paranoid" is harshly inconsiderate and disrespectful. Please do not make such a comment in the future especially to us Veterans.

"I would think that they would have trained you better in that you can't tell what the pressure is by looking at it" Again, being inconsiderate and insulting with your Military Service related remark.... What gives you the right and the authority to sling insults and disrespect Military Service members?

For your clarification and reference, even in this 21st Century tech savvy times that we live in, HMMWV which are the most used light utility vehicle in all branches of Military, does not have the TPMS, so need to conduct PCMS before every mission is crucial. And during the mission, one would conduct a visual inspection. Now are they trained to inspect a 5lb drop in pressure? Of course not, visual inspection is just that VISUAL to assess functionality.

What you called "paranoid" is what I call a "habitual visual safety inspection" and believe me, it doesn't take but a couple of seconds for me to look over my tires as I approach the vehicle, so it is not silly nor a waste of time, as such a habit has saved my arse from slow leaks and tire issues in tactical military vehicles as well as my personal vehicles in the past.

Stop being disrespectful and stick to the topic without imposing your ways and inserting your emotions.
I wholeheartedly agree!

I'm not a veteran but have friends and family who have served.

Comments such as these are made about all kinds of serious mental health issues, and not just related to vets. OCD, for example, is used as a pejorative by people who have absolutely no clue what it actually means.
 

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I wholeheartedly agree!

I'm not a veteran but have friends and family who have served.

Comments such as these are made about all kinds of serious mental health issues, and not just related to vets. OCD, for example, is used as a pejorative by people who have absolutely no clue what it actually means.
So true... especially in Military people use the term OCD incorrectly as if it's a condition that most "detail oriented" people have, and is something that one is proud to have just because they want to brag about how precise or detailed they are about their work... when in reality it is a debilitating mental condition...
 

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So true... especially in Military people use the term OCD incorrectly as if it's a condition that most "detail oriented" people have, and is something that one is proud to have just because they want to brag about how precise or detailed they are about their work... when in reality it is a debilitating mental condition...
OC personality traits can be useful in some fields (e.g. software development, accounting, inspecting a plane before it takes off for a mission, etc.)

There's a huge difference between an OC personality trait (i.e. extreme attention to detail) and OCD as a disorder (i.e. you have to wash your hands exactly seven times with a new bar of soap each time).

So misunderstood...
 

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Here in Europe TPMS is a legal requirement for cars registered after 2010. Having had a puncture in each of my Toyotas and being told that by the TPMS I thought it useful but not life changing. I've previously had a Jeep Patriot 2.2d and was forever having problems with the unreliable electrics; the TPMS system amongst them.

Fast forward to my Renault Duster hire car here in Saudi, I've had loads of punctures (working between construction sites) and I've spotted them all before the tyre goes flat. Repair at the local petrol station is easy.

I've come to the conclusion that TPMS is useful but not essential. Would anyone agree?
I've lived in Germany for a few years so I understand and empathize with you on the strict European regulations, as I had no choice but to install TPMS even in my winter tires. However, in Europe with their Autobahns, being safe definitely beats being sorry, so I am all for being overly cautious and stringent regulations.

I whole heartedly agree on the TPMS not being essential as I've spotted punctures or slow leaks myself, just as you have. That is the reason why out of habit, I visually inspect tires as I walk up to the vehicles. IMHO, TPMS is a convenience and a safety feature which adds to your good safety habits.
 
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