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Good morning! I own a 2018 Crosstrek Limited and I'm considering purchasing a Tab camper (with brakes) but it is 300 lbs over the maximum weight of 1500 lbs. (1848 lbs to be exact). I am in Florida where the terrain is mostly flat but it's hot. And then there's the added concern of towing in mountainous regions. I'm concerned that given the environment, the additional weight will be detrimental to the vehicle over time. Clearly I could opt for a lighter camper but I'm curious to see what experience other Crosstrek owners have had. Thank you!
 

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Good morning! I own a 2018 Crosstrek Limited and I'm considering purchasing a Tab camper (with brakes) but it is 300 lbs over the maximum weight of 1500 lbs. (1848 lbs to be exact). I am in Florida where the terrain is mostly flat but it's hot. And then there's the added concern of towing in mountainous regions. I'm concerned that given the environment, the additional weight will be detrimental to the vehicle over time. Clearly I could opt for a lighter camper but I'm curious to see what experience other Crosstrek owners have had. Thank you!
The 1848 pounds is curb weight/dry weight. Then you're gonna pack up the cabinets with goodies, stock the fridge, fill the water tank (11 gallons water x 8.4 pounds = 92.4 pounds). So you'll already be over 1 ton/2000 pounds. Trailer is rated at 140 pounds on the tongue, so you'll probably get significant rear sink. Add in whatever play gear/camp gear/hike gear and such you'll take, clothes, and meat cargo (that's you and your partner!) in the car, probably be approaching 2,500 pounds you'll be hauling around.

I recently did a trip to Canyonlands, Utah, for a float trip down the Green River, up and over the Continental Divide and back. Towed my Canoe trailer with gear. I swag somewhere around 600 pounds being pulled. My 18 Crossy did fine for the most part. Could feel the trailer behind me though. Some of the high mountain passes though, such as Vail Pass at 10,666 feet, rather steep with a road grade on some stretches at 7%, the little 2.0 litrer was wrapping some really high RPMs and was struggling a bit, the CVT staying down in the lows.

My opinion is that you would be pushing your Crosstrek way hard with that much weight and will burn it up. Go with a Tag Teardrop at half the weight. Or upgrade to a Subie Outback or Forester with the 2.5 liter.

I have been considering a teardrop myself. Sure it's half the trailer, I'll spend all the time outside, except for sleeping, but it is smaller, lighter, and far more maneuverable than a regular camp trailer. And yeah, there's no pooper in a teardrop. But I have a Coyote.

 

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The 1848 pounds is curb weight/dry weight. Then you're gonna pack up the cabinets with goodies, stock the fridge, fill the water tank (11 gallons water x 8.4 pounds = 92.4 pounds). So you'll already be over 1 ton/2000 pounds. Trailer is rated at 140 pounds on the tongue, so you'll probably get significant rear sink. Add in whatever play gear/camp gear/hike gear and such you'll take, clothes, and meat cargo (that's you and your partner!) in the car, probably be approaching 2,500 pounds you'll be hauling around.

I recently did a trip to Canyonlands, Utah, for a float trip down the Green River, up and over the Continental Divide and back. Towed my Canoe trailer with gear. I swag somewhere around 600 pounds being pulled. My 18 Crossy did fine for the most part. Could feel the trailer behind me though. Some of the high mountain passes though, such as Vail Pass at 10,666 feet, rather steep with a road grade on some stretches at 7%, the little 2.0 litrer was wrapping some really high RPMs and was struggling a bit, the CVT staying down in the lows.

My opinion is that you would be pushing your Crosstrek way hard with that much weight and will burn it up. Go with a Tag Teardrop at half the weight. Or upgrade to a Subie Outback or Forester with the 2.5 liter.

I have been considering a teardrop myself. Sure it's half the trailer, I'll spend all the time outside, except for sleeping, but it is smaller, lighter, and far more maneuverable than a regular camp trailer. And yeah, there's no pooper in a teardrop. But I have a Coyote.

Thank you very much!! I really appreciate the input!! That sounds like a great trip - wish I was there today! I'm actually looking at the 2020 Little Guy MyPod - looks mighty cozy :)
 

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Thank you very much!! I really appreciate the input!! That sounds like a great trip - wish I was there today! I'm actually looking at the 2020 Little Guy MyPod - looks mighty cozy :)
Indeed, the MyPod looks very cozy, and is mighty cute.

I am tending more towards the basic classic teardrop with the galley in the back and some storage. Here's a link to one manufacturer in Canada, the Teardrop Trailer, that starts with the basic, the 4x8 Tin Top Woody, 800 pounds. Very affordable starting price. One of the vids actually shows a Crosstrek pulling one along. I really like it. And it looks very easy to customize it to make it your own.

 

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I tow a 3500 lb boat/trailer with mine, just twice a year, to and from our cabin. But it is mostly flat terrain and less than 100 miles. Handles just fine, although of course not a lot power for any hills, but can still do freeway speeds, no problem. And I do have trailer brakes.

The Crosstrek in Australia and EU is actually rated for 3000 lbs. So it can obviously tow more than 1500. But I would not do that for a long trip, esp up mountains on a hot day (like in the US southwest in the summer).

With the Crosstrek, towing or even not, don't load up the rear too heavy, or it will become a little unstable. So be mindful to keep your tongue weight not too heavy. Also, don't tow a trailer with a short tongue, that can be very dangerous, too. Most boat trailers have a long tongue, but that is not the case with some travel trailers.

When you tow it initially, it is a good idea to test it out as you gain speed, by weaving back and forth and doing a little braking. Mine was as stable as I could want. Just not a lot of acceleration,... as expected.

297018
 

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I believe the issue you would have would be the transmission overheating. (from what I've read) I think the Australian models have an additional transmission cooler. i could be wrong. However, i do agree that you would be pushing the limits. If you're handy with simple wood working tools, the Oregon Batman has a youtube channel and is building a tear drop trailer with rear galley that comes in just around 1000 lbs. He offers plans and his videos are extremely well done. He's building a fine looking little camper. We ordered some plans from him and are planning to build one that we can pull with our Crosstrek or our Forester.
 

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Our 900 lb Coleman Redwood pop up seems to be an easy pull. I'm sure that towing more is possible but it's a nice new car and I wouldn't want to take the chance of overloading it. You might become danger to others as well if something goes wrong.
 

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This isn't the first trailer towing thread I've seen on here. It's interesting that nobody has found an official reason for the maximum tow-weight discrepancy between the USA and Europe. Regardless, I'd stick to the limits specified for the sake of the warranty. If someone pulled a heavier rig and ended up with engine and/or transmission damage and SOA discovered it? Zero coverage and the owner would be on the hook for all repairs.

But I'm still curious about the tow weight discrepancy. Anybody?
 

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'18 and '19 Crosstrek Limiteds
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If this chart is correct and up to date, for the UK, it depends on the engine and transmission. All lineartronics are limited to 1,200Kg, 1,500Kg for manuals and 1,600Kg for diesels. All of which makes sense. So those who are saying it's 3,500lbs elsewhere, it only applies to the manual diesel, at least in the UK.

Still, 1,200Kg is 2,640lbs so the 1,500lb limits must have something to do with regulations or liability or both.
 
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I worry about the physics of towing something that is nearly as heavy as a vehicle that weighs about 1446 kg. I'm concerned about the possibilty of the cart being able to overpower the horse. All of this happening on four surprisingly small tire patches on the tow car. Straight line, no problem, rainy, twisty, downhill road...maybe a big problem for more than the driver of the Subaru. I have a lot of respect for folks on this forum and it makes me think that everyone here would recognize and adapt their driving to the conditions that might make a tow more risky. I don't know the rest of the people and tend to be a bit paranoid about people towing stuff.
 

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I worry about the physics of towing something that is nearly as heavy as a vehicle that weighs about 1446 kg. I'm concerned about the possibilty of the cart being able to overpower the horse. All of this happening on four surprisingly small tire patches on the tow car. Straight line, no problem, rainy, twisty, downhill road...maybe a big problem for more than the driver of the Subaru. I have a lot of respect for folks on this forum and it makes me think that everyone here would recognize and adapt their driving to the conditions that might make a tow more risky. I don't know the rest of the people and tend to be a bit paranoid about people towing stuff.
As with so many things here, if someone come here for advice on towing capacity and they see that someone says it's OK to tow 3,500lbs, who knows what they will do to their CVT, themselves or others...
 
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