Subaru Crosstrek and XV Forums banner

How many of you:

  • A

  • B

  • C

  • D

  • E

81 - 100 of 137 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
There is no reason to wait until the blue light is off until driving...
BTW, it remains on until coolant temperature reaches 50C.
Agreed about 50C and no need to wait as the user manual doesn't say anything about blue. As for when the blue light goes out, 50C (122F) has been posted on several older threads. The first instance I read about this the poster claimed to have had a monitor plugged in an correlated 50C to blue light going out. I don't know this poster, but at least she/he provided seemingly real data and I'm inclined to believe it absent other opinions that don't cite their reference. I'm too lazy to get out my own monitor.
 

·
Registered
2020 Premium 6MT
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Imagine if these crosstreks talked like the mid 1980's chrysler new Yorkers. "Your engine is cold,please install blanket before proceeding.

Sent from my SM-N986U1 using Tapatalk
If it were a 1980's Chrysler, it would say "Your engine is leaking oil, please repair".
 
  • Like
Reactions: Montanan

·
Registered
2020 Premium 6MT
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Here's a pic of an instrument cluster from a 1968 Chrysler, courtesy of eBay. Pretty classy!

View attachment 310677
Interesting that this one has an alternator gauge, but not a temperature gauge.

I could tell immediately it was from a Chrysler as they were the only ones that had the speedometer needle facing down rather than up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Closed Case

·
Registered
2019 Canadian Sport trim (6MT // 2.0 )
Joined
·
797 Posts
Agreed about 50C and no need to wait as the user manual doesn't say anything about blue. As for when the blue light goes out, 50C (122F) has been posted on several older threads. The first instance I read about this the poster claimed to have had a monitor plugged in an correlated 50C to blue light going out. I don't know this poster, but at least she/he provided seemingly real data and I'm inclined to believe it absent other opinions that don't cite their reference. I'm too lazy to get out my own monitor.
Verified with an OBD2 reader + Torque Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I'm just curious. How many of you:

A: Treat it like any other car, get in, start it and immediately put it in gear and start driving normally completely ignoring the blue light.
B: Get in, start it and immediately put it in gear but take it easy till the blue light goes off.
C: Either remote start it or start it and sit and wait till the blue light goes off before even putting it in gear.
D: Get in, start it but wait till all the dash lights, etc turn off and the car settles a bit before you put it in gear.
E: I get in and redline it at the nearest intersection.

I currently do 'C', but may be changing it to see how much it increases my fuel economy. Just want to see what others do, out of curiosity.
Voted B, but don't like putting into gear immediately as revs are high, but do it most times with foot firmly on the brake, then drive steadily for a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I'm just curious. How many of you:

A: Treat it like any other car, get in, start it and immediately put it in gear and start driving normally completely ignoring the blue light.
B: Get in, start it and immediately put it in gear but take it easy till the blue light goes off.
C: Either remote start it or start it and sit and wait till the blue light goes off before even putting it in gear.
D: Get in, start it but wait till all the dash lights, etc turn off and the car settles a bit before you put it in gear.
E: I get in and redline it at the nearest intersection.

I currently do 'C', but may be changing it to see how much it increases my fuel economy. Just want to see what others do, out of curiosity.
Between B-C. Start and wait until first RPM nock sound, usually about 10-15 seconds. If if start and drive RPM don’t go down or talks longer sometimes 40 MPH in 2k RPM is annoying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
What "nock sound" are you referring to?
When you cold start about 10 seconds depends how cold the weather, RPM is about 2k and then it nock. I don’t know how to explain this, but next time you first start stare at RPM gages also you can hear engine sound goes down and up, after that put to drive rpm is drop as normal even blue light still on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
The fast idle & rich fuel mixture is nothing new @ start up. Summmer or winter, doesn't matter. In summer, its a shorter warm up. Start and drive, just try to not put the pedal to the metal, till engine warms up.

My first car, 1956 Chevy V8, did it. The carburetor had a flap that restricted air flow, making a fuel rich mix. A cam on the linkage, kept the RPM up. A coil spring that made the choke work , have electric heating element, that warmed the spring slowly.

New is the same old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
When you cold start about 10 seconds depends how cold the weather, RPM is about 2k and then it nock. I don’t know how to explain this, but next time you first start stare at RPM gages also you can hear engine sound goes down and up, after that put to drive rpm is drop as normal even blue light still on.
The nock (knock) is most likely a hydraulic valver lifter. A defective one will not hold the oil, when sitting awhile. It will knock till it builds up internal oil pressure, on start up.
 

·
Registered
2020 Premium 6MT
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
The fast idle & rich fuel mixture is nothing new @ start up. Summmer or winter, doesn't matter. In summer, its a shorter warm up. Start and drive, just try to not put the pedal to the metal, till engine warms up.

My first car, 1956 Chevy V8, did it. The carburetor had a flap that restricted air flow, making a fuel rich mix. A cam on the linkage, kept the RPM up. A coil spring that made the choke work , have electric heating element, that warmed the spring slowly.

New is the same old.
Yep, nothing new except that with carburetors, this was done mechanically. Now with fuel injection, it's all done electronically.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Closed Case

·
Registered
2021 Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
503 Posts
Discussion Starter · #100 ·
The fast idle & rich fuel mixture is nothing new @ start up. Summmer or winter, doesn't matter. In summer, its a shorter warm up. Start and drive, just try to not put the pedal to the metal, till engine warms up.
Yep, nothing new except that with carburetors, this was done mechanically. Now with fuel injection, it's all done electronically.
True, but with carbureted engines I would NEVER shift it from park to reverse/drive while it was still on high idle. I have a car with a '73 Pontiac motor and you pump it once and turn it over. It starts on high idle and you simply blip the gas pedal and it goes off of high idle and now you can shift it out of park. If I were to shift it out of park while still on high idle it will chirp the tires when going into gear (and you better have your foot hard on the brake pedal as well). Not good for the driveline.

I know today's cars have torque management built into the ECU programming to keep things like that from happening, but it's still hard for me to shift into gear at high idle. My Subaru is the first late model vehicle I've had that has such a pronounced high idle when cold.
 
81 - 100 of 137 Posts
Top