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Pop out the little plastic square on the front or rear bumper.
Screw in the eye bolt. (Mine is on top of my spare, under the rear carpet, in a molded Styrofoam factory holder.)
 

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and if your going off road anywhere it wouldnt be a bad idea to screw one in before you go it can be fairly tricky to get to it if your up to the back bumper with mud and water all from experience
 

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and if your going off road anywhere it wouldnt be a bad idea to screw one in before you go it can be fairly tricky to get to it if your up to the back bumper with mud and water all from experience
+1 for this advice. I'm looking for a second eye bolt that isn't the national debt. (aftermarket ones are ridiculously priced)
 

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You have no true recovery points the only tow point which is not rated for recovery . I'm looking into bolt on recovery mounts at front at the moment however an equalizer strap will still need to be use so as not to miss align the chassis sub frame . The best rear point would be a rated towbar and using a slide in hitch .
 

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You have no true recovery points the only tow point which is not rated for recovery . <snip>
Huh, I guess my tow points must be magical then. ;) They've been used to recover several vehicles, including a full sized f150 4x4. No bending, no frame problems, car tracks just fine, all the seams still align and doors and hood close just fine. The eye bolt is straight and threads in true. Truth be told, the tow point is for recovery and it is stated as such in the manual. (although the manual has the caveat "only in an emergency") However, I am certain you are correct that it is possible to do damage if not done properly as the off-center location is not ideal. I certainly wouldn't try an off-axis pull with it as I could see that doing exactly as you state, causing frame damage.

Of course a pair of recovery mounts and an equalizer strap would be an improvement. But seriously, where are you taking an XV where that would be necessary? It's not a rock crawler or a swamp buggy, and if you try to use it as such, you'll do more damage then just torquing the frame. :D

Not trying to be argumentative here, you give some good info about recovery options, but I think you were a bit overzealous with that statement.

Cheers.
 

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If you have even seen the damage a busted strap and d shackle can make of a car and person you would know where my point is from . As a off road driver assessor I guess I would be in educated to state these views so use the tow point and good luck .
 

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If you have even seen the damage a busted strap and d shackle can make of a car and person you would know where my point is from . As a off road driver assessor I guess I would be in educated to state these views so use the tow point and good luck .
No offense meant, ick72, since you're considered an expert, I would hope that you would post some documentation. Please, show us the load ratings and failure analysis. I was unable to find those and validate you comments. I did try. I was unable to find anything that substantiates your claim that the tow point is a common failure point. In fact I found zero evidence to support your claim about the Subaru tow point. Are you basing that on snatch straps? If so I can support you there. But snatch straps are exactly the kind of amateur technique that destroys well engineered equipment.

With 30+ years of off road experience, an engineering education and a lifetime of experience in the field, I think I'm a smart enough monkey to understand the data you will provide and I'd be thrilled to have some hard facts. :D As it stands, I can only use my considerable personal experience and education to formulate an educated guess. But then again, you may know better as I am unfamiliar with the degree of "off road driver assessor", is that a doctorate program?

Putting the pissing contest aside, the "over engineering" of off road vehicles to the point that they weigh double the weight required for safety and reliability has been a theme of amateur off roading for years, it is of some importance to note that the professionals use lighter/thinner materials and strive to both maximize safety and minimize weight very effectively. The difference being educated and experienced professionals vs amateur technique.

You mentioned busted straps and shackles, but were are talking about the XVs tow point. If you don't mind, let's try to keep the conversation focused on that equipment and leave 3rd party equipment failures out of it. I'm perfectly willing to bow to your greater knowledge, I only ask that you show some documentation to support your contention.

Thanks and Best Regards!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok thanks I wondered what that thing with the spare wheel was for. I should really read the manual one day but it's huge. I'm getting a tow bar fitted in the next few months and I am going to get the recovery hitch with it.
 

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I'm out to prove no one wrong and I'm not going into it on a thread here ive stated my point . Maybe I'm just a lower rate down under person who can prove nothing. Anyway good luck with any offloading endeavors and recoveries
 

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I am confused now :(

Is it safe to use the tow points to tow and recover? What are the the things one needs to keep in mind when doing so? What should be used for towing if straps can break and damage the car/injure people?

And why did Subaru provide asymmetrical tow points if they can damage the frame?

Please help enlighten someone who doesn't have any experience with this!
 

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At the risk of sowing more confusion, I *think* we're talking about the difference between "snatching" and towing.

Snatching: Snatch Recovery - Explained - 4x4 Earth
involves slack in the snatch strap and allows you to put a lot of energy into recovering a stuck vehicle.

Towing, on the other hand, should be a much more gentle process; the towing vehicle slowly drives and gently takes up the slack. In snatching, the towing vehicle moves off more quickly and the snatch strap almost acts like a giant rubber band.

Snatching, if not done right, can be fatal; people have been killed by hardware (shackles, recovery points etc.) breaking and becoming lethal missiles.

My humble understanding of the recovery points on the XV (e.g. the front screw in eye-bolt) is that they are fine for gentle towing but *not* for snatching.
 

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Indeed DoppelRu. In some situations, such as your car stuck in the super-soft sand on Stockton Beach near Newcastle, it could never be towed. The towing vehicle itself has no traction either and must rely on sheer momentum, instead, to get the job done. Snatching can exert several tons of force over a very short period of time. This is why the rule of thumb states that D-shackles and recovery points must be rated to at least twice the vehicle's total weight. In reference to the XV, I've gone over this a few times with people in the biz, and they've all stated that the screw-in "recovery" hook is a death missile in the making. The two tie-down hoops under the near-midpoint of the car are completely inadequate - even between the two of them.

I'm looking at structurally strengthening these two points so that they are recovery-rated, but I think that there is an alternative way. I'm looking at installing a solid tow bar off which an appropriate hitch is mounted. From there, install a steel loop or two down either side of the chassis to guide an equaliser strap forward under the car to the front - from which you could snatch more safely. Routing past the exhaust is an issue, but I think that there's room either side. In any case, snatching the car forward against the tow bar is a LOT safer than using a threaded bolt that you're depending on not stripping its threads...
 

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Another proof to the motion of not using your XV for snatch recovery. Like the saying goes: pictures worth a thousand words... This is a picture of the towing point in the front of the vehicle. Notice how strong is the connection of the piece containing a threaded section where you screw in the threaded bolt.

front.jpg

The connection point was even flimsier in the rear. The following pictures illustrate what happened in trying to snatch a Land Rover LR2 (curb weight of 4000 lbs) stuck in snow. The rope was a normal wire rope, not a snatch rope. Mind you: the outside temperature on that day was -30C (-22F) which surely was a factor in the incident. Still, something to think about before dreaming of a mega-strong billet-machined threaded bolt. The factory bolt (or its threads) is surely not the weakest spot.

1.jpg 2.jpg 4.jpg

The pictures and the sad story borrowed from a Russian XV forum.
 

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After reading this, a few points I can think of:

1. The XV wasn't stuck in the snow while the Land Rover LR2 was!
2. Recovery points are just that... recovery points for the car that it's connected to... not for the car that weighs 50% more.
 

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After reading this, a few points I can think of:

1. The XV wasn't stuck in the snow while the Land Rover LR2 was!
2. Recovery points are just that... recovery points for the car that it's connected to... not for the car that weighs 50% more.
Subaru builds a Great vehicle, but the last time I checked I failed to see anywhere that it said you are now the proud owner of a Tow Recovery Vehicle

Drive and enjoy your ride.... Let the Towing companies do the Heavy work their Trucks were designed for, leaving you you to have Fun :icon_lol:

Troutbum
 

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Another good point to mention to others. The factory screw-in hook is NOT a snatch point. It's a slow motion tow point. That "mega-strong billet machined threaded bolt" is a visible decorative tow hook. Not a snatch hook.
 

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Given that these front and back locations are what they are, it strikes me that someone dolling one of these vehicles up to look more like an off-road vehicle could drill the appropriate size hole in the cover and have a custom bolt holding a D-ring permanently installed there as an added touch of "bad to the bone".

The clear understanding on my part at least is that this modification would of course be what...like 87-94 percent aesthetic, but done properly it would look pretty darn cool.
 

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and if your going off road anywhere it wouldnt be a bad idea to screw one in before you go it can be fairly tricky to get to it if your up to the back bumper with mud and water all from experience
I read from somewhere that leaving in the eye bolt may afftect the airbag, but probably ok before you approach a traction incident.
 
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