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Everyone is entitled to their opinion but I don’t think that not having drls make me any more likely to have an accident than say I forget to turn my headlights on at dusk bc I think my lights are already on and not have any tail lights on.
I'm generally supportive of what you're trying to accomplish, but I'm going to have to part company with you on this explanation. Forgetting to turn your lights on at dusk does definitely increase your chances of a collision. If you're equating that with disabling your DRLs, then you're essentially saying that disabling them does create a diminished safety condition equivalent to never turning your lights on at dusk.

Personally, I would like LED headlights, but I'll wait to do the upgrade until there's a solution that doesn't involve compromise. Right now the compromise is either have the DRLs at full high-beam brightness or turn them off completely. Many people reason that DRLs were never a requirement until recently, so your safety is no worse than if you were driving a pre-DRL car. But I think drivers are growing more and more accustomed to seeing DRLs, and thus becoming more likely to overlook a car without them, making cars without DRLs progressively less safe over time.

I base this on my own experience with center brake lights. I learned to drive before center brake lights were required, so you'd think it wouldn't matter to me whether the car in front of me has one or not. But in practice I find that if the car in front of me has a burned out brake light, I'm slower to notice he's on the brakes if it's the center light that's out. At some point between 1985 and now, they've become what I notice first, and I think DRLs are gradually changing driver attention habits in a similar way. So I don't want my car to eventually become the kind of car that's not noticed until it's too late.
 

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Everyone is entitled to their opinion but I don’t think that not having drls make me any more likely to have an accident than say I forget to turn my headlights on at dusk bc I think my lights are already on and not have any tail lights on.
I totally agree with you.

I will try the cruise control out while pulling up a tiny bit on the parking brake. If it kicks the cruise off then I am for sure not moving forward with it. Thanks for all the constructive comments.
Read my post again...that's what I was trying to say. It will "kick the cruise off". Sorry for the confusing explanation!
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Read my post again...that's what I was trying to say. It will "kick the cruise off". Sorry for the confusing explanation!
I got you. I read it quickly and didn’t fully understand. I have used my parking brake before to dip out on some blue lights back in my crazy teenage days. Why did they have to put in a switch to do this. Does the parking brake make the brake lights come on. Sorry for the confusion. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
I would like to see if I can find some data on the percentages of accidents that occur during the day vs at night. Everyone has their lights on at night which should mean that they will always be seen but that isn’t the case. I’m not going to argue the merits of having your lights on during the day anymore. I didn’t start the thread for opinions on whether I should do this. I started it to see if I could do it. I guess my little white Crosstrek will just have to be the scourge of the roads if we can figure out how.
 

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I'm pretty sure it doesn't...just turns off the DRL's and lights the dash warning light. Another unusual idea from the engineers at Subaru.
Not unusual at all. The brake lights, on the back of the car not the dash, only come on when the brake pedal is depressed activating the switch by the brake pedal. The parking brake has nothing to do with the tail brake lights, it is not connected to the switch in any way in any car. It is a hand brake for parking or emergency use and is not connected to the brake lights. If it were, your brake lights would be lit whenever the car was parked and the hand brake engaged. Note that with the engine OFF, step on the brake pedal and the brake lights come ON.
 

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Someone has this video on youtube:
where he disconnects the resistor located in the wheel well. Not sure if this applies to the 2019, but FYI in case it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
So it just passed the cruise control test. I set the cruise, lifted the brake handle ever so slightly and nothing happened except the light on the dash. No crashes and the world didn’t end. I’m not sure why my cruise still works but it does. No abs lights or anything. I tried an emergency stop and everything worked as it should. I am going to do some longer term testing for a week or so. I’m going to roll a beanie up and put it under the handle to make it stay that way. If everything continues to work properly I will look more into taking the cluster out and removing the bulb for the brake warning light and I’ll be ready for the led high beams. I’m not sure if I’ll put a stop in for the ebrake handle or try to short the switch. Depends on how it looks when I get in there. I’m pretty stoked that this might be a viable solution.
 

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I doubt you're going to find bulbs in sockets that you can remove behind the cluster. It's more likely to be LEDs surface-mounted on a circuit board.
 

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Out of curiosity I looked in the Subaru online parts catalog for the LED headlight assemblies from the Limited trim models, to see if it can be retrofitted. I have some good news, and I have some bad news.

First the good news:

Selection_089.jpg

So according to Subaru, you can swap it in.

Now the bad news:

Selection_090.jpg

So I guess one would want to keep an eye on wrecking yards.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Out of curiosity I looked in the Subaru online parts catalog for the LED headlight assemblies from the Limited trim models, to see if it can be retrofitted. I have some good news, and I have some bad news.

First the good news:

View attachment 288212

So according to Subaru, you can swap it in.

Now the bad news:

View attachment 288214

So I guess one would want to keep an eye on wrecking yards.

Wow! I don’t think I’ll be paying that much for those. I can replace every bulb in the car and have spares for that. The first commute went well. I can tell zero difference except the indicator.
 

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Well of course they'll fit, it's the same car. Now it won't connect to your existing harness. LED is Bi-LED, DRL is the "C light". Someone on the impreza5 forums showed how to wire it though. You can find them used for around 200-300 or so each.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Day two down and everything is fine. I talked to the guy who does my tint about it and he’s going to help me out with pulling the console and the cluster.
 

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It’s usually much simpler to disable DRLs. There is a relay that switches the brights between two different circuits. One circuit has a resistor to drop the voltage to the high beams. On my 2014, that resistor is tucked up near the passenger headlight and keyless beeper. You unplug it and it’s taken care of.

I did this and run my parking lights. Turns out there is a little bulb way in the corner of the headlight housing. Looks pretty cool when you swap in some LEDs and no longer have the dated looking halogen high beam at half brightness.

You need a service manual, subscribe for 1 day to Subaru’s TIS or whatever it’s called and look at the wiring diagram. Then look for where the resistor is located.

Edit: Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but I don’t see why people feel the need to share it when someone is asking a question. Sure, if you are able to give a helpful answer on the car configuration that helps the OP, by all means, follow it up with your opinion. But simply responding about how it isn’t a good idea and/or saying it’s impossible isn’t helpful.

Cars don’t disappear when the DRL’s are off. In my opinion, DRLs happened because too many people would forget to turn their headlights on in dusk and heavy rain and fog. If the OP knows enough to change their bulbs for LED, they won’t be forgetting to turn their headlights on.

Sure is your car “more visible”..? yes I’d say for your average person though, visibility on a clear day goes from 99.5 percent to 99.9 percent. For anyone on the road where the car in questions visibility goes from 50 percent to 70 percent, they, like drivers who are still driving at 95 years old, need to take the bus.

There are two categories of people in the world. Those who wait at a don’t walk sign when no cars are visible in any direction until the sign says go. And those that look around, see no cars, and make a judgement call that there is no need to stand and wait just because the sign told them to.
 

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It’s usually much simpler to disable DRLs. There is a relay that switches the brights between two different circuits. One circuit has a resistor to drop the voltage to the high beams. On my 2014, that resistor is tucked up near the passenger headlight and keyless beeper. You unplug it and it’s taken care of.

I did this and run my parking lights. Turns out there is a little bulb way in the corner of the headlight housing. Looks pretty cool when you swap in some LEDs and no longer have the dated looking halogen high beam at half brightness.

You need a service manual, subscribe for 1 day to Subaru’s TIS or whatever it’s called and look at the wiring diagram. Then look for where the resistor is located.
Someone has already responded with a video of how to do this in first generation models like yours, but the responses to that video establish that this technique will not work on the second generation cars.

Cars don’t disappear when the DRL’s are off. In my opinion, DRLs happened because too many people would forget to turn their headlights on in dusk and heavy rain and fog. If the OP knows enough to change their bulbs for LED, they won’t be forgetting to turn their headlights on.

Sure is your car “more visible”..? yes I’d say for your average person though, visibility on a clear day goes from 99.5 percent to 99.9 percent. For anyone on the road where the car in questions visibility goes from 50 percent to 70 percent, they, like drivers who are still driving at 95 years old, need to take the bus.
That's a lot of guessing with numbers. I'd be very surprised if there was actual research showing the visibility difference was only 0.4%. But the main problem with this argument is just dismissing the existence of problematic drivers with "they should take the bus." The fact is that those people will not all start taking the bus when you disable your DRLs. They will still be on the road, and in traffic that increasingly consists of cars with DRLs, your car will be less visible to them, and more vulnerable.

There are two categories of people in the world. Those who wait at a don’t walk sign when no cars are visible in any direction until the sign says go. And those that look around, see no cars, and make a judgement call that there is no need to stand and wait just because the sign told them to.
Do you also blow red lights when driving if there's no other traffic around? :D Same principle.
 

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It’s usually much simpler to disable DRLs. There is a relay that switches the brights between two different circuits. One circuit has a resistor to drop the voltage to the high beams. On my 2014, that resistor is tucked up near the passenger headlight and keyless beeper. You unplug it and it’s taken care of.

I did this and run my parking lights. Turns out there is a little bulb way in the corner of the headlight housing. Looks pretty cool when you swap in some LEDs and no longer have the dated looking halogen high beam at half brightness.

You need a service manual, subscribe for 1 day to Subaru’s TIS or whatever it’s called and look at the wiring diagram. Then look for where the resistor is located.
Someone has already responded with a video of how to do this in first generation models like yours, but the responses to that video establish that this technique will not work on the second generation cars.

Cars don’t disappear when the DRL’s are off. In my opinion, DRLs happened because too many people would forget to turn their headlights on in dusk and heavy rain and fog. If the OP knows enough to change their bulbs for LED, they won’t be forgetting to turn their headlights on.

Sure is your car “more visible”..? yes I’d say for your average person though, visibility on a clear day goes from 99.5 percent to 99.9 percent. For anyone on the road where the car in questions visibility goes from 50 percent to 70 percent, they, like drivers who are still driving at 95 years old, need to take the bus.
That's a lot of guessing with numbers. I'd be very surprised if there was actual research showing the visibility difference was only 0.4%. But the main problem with this argument is just dismissing the existence of problematic drivers with "they should take the bus." The fact is that those people will not all start taking the bus when you disable your DRLs. They will still be on the road, and in traffic that increasingly consists of cars with DRLs, your car will be less visible to them, and more vulnerable.

There are two categories of people in the world. Those who wait at a don’t walk sign when no cars are visible in any direction until the sign says go. And those that look around, see no cars, and make a judgement call that there is no need to stand and wait just because the sign told them to.
Do you also blow red lights when driving if there's no other traffic around? <img src="http://www.subaruxvforum.com/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.png" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" /> Same principle.
Thanks I see that now. I think this is the first and last day I will use my phone to browse the forum. For some reason things aren’t displaying properly or I’m missing something. Well if someone wants to screenshot me the page of the wiring diagram that shows headlights I can think it over. I’ll see if I happen to have a copy for the newer body style.

Obviously, I don’t have numbers, they’re estimates.

DRLs don’t solve the problem of problematic drivers. They improve cases of problematic drivers, moreso the problematic drivers that forget to turn their lights on when they are necessary and visibility is reduced.. my bet is the OP doesn’t fall in that category.

That’s a cute smiley. I do not always sit at red arrows and wait for them to change depends on the situation. I stop, look, and proceed (in almost no case do I “blow” them). I don’t agree with that being a very good comparison however... the police are more likely to take issue with that then a car that doesn’t have working DRLs (when a huge percentage of cars on the road don’t and never had them)... it isn’t common for people to move through red lights (except on right turns of course).

Oh and I didn’t disagree about the more vulnerable. But people concerned about vulnerability should consider buying a larger vehicle.
 

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That's unexpected. My understanding was that cars that use the high-beams for DRL have them at reduced voltage, but your readings would indicate otherwise. Maybe take an AC reading and see if the car is sending AC to the bulb in DRL usage. I've heard some cars do it that way.

I wouldn't expect a 1V change to make much difference in light output for an incandescent bulb. It would be interesting to take lumen readings of the bulb in DRL mode and in high beam mode and see how far apart they actually are.
I'll do some more testing this weekend...and actually write the numbers down. The fuse box in the engine bay also showed similar numbers. I'll try in AC and note the numbers.
 
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