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Discussion Starter #1
Tell me your secrets. What are the common speed limits you drive? is your area hilly, or flat? Do you accelerate slow up to the cruise speed, or quick? Do you keep under a certain RPM level? Special fuel? Low wind? mild temperatures?


I want to try an experiment where I drive like you drive, and see if I can replicate your mileage.
 

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my crosstrek should be here around december 10th, but i have managed to get much higher than others have in other vehicles. the biggest gains in most vehicles can be had by keeping highway speeds down as much as safely possible (60 to 65 mph range maybe), accelerating smoothly and slowly, avoid headwinds as much as possible by drafting other vehicles safely (you dont have to be super close to them), watch way up the road for red lights (coast up to them), and one of the very best gains to be had is by not idling anymore than you have to. every second spent with the engine running and not moving is ZERO mpg's.
 

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i find that the fuel consumption on mine goes up pretty rapidly above 65-70 mph. i commute ~100 miles a day, approximately 1/4 country roads and 3/4 interstate. if there isn't traffic congestion i average about 38.5 by keeping the speed under control. also - i'm pretty careful about keeping my tire pressures up where they belong and i don't carry around any more crap than i just have to. other than that i just drive it as steady as i can - try to stay on the + side of the MPG gauge, as someone said above.
 

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Simple: Drive to keep the MPG needle on the plus side of that gauge whenever possible. Whenever it's on the negative side your MPG average is declining.
I do this and stay near the posted speed. Usually drive 3-5 over the highway limits and consistently get 34+ mpgs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Simple: Drive to keep the MPG needle on the plus side of that gauge whenever possible. Whenever it's on the negative side your MPG average is declining.
Okay, I've tried that, but here's a question: when you have to go up a hill or get up to speed, do you drag it out and take it really easy, do it as quickly as possible without overshooting, or something modest/in between?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i find that the fuel consumption on mine goes up pretty rapidly above 65-70 mph. i commute ~100 miles a day, approximately 1/4 country roads and 3/4 interstate. if there isn't traffic congestion i average about 38.5 by keeping the speed under control. also - i'm pretty careful about keeping my tire pressures up where they belong and i don't carry around any more crap than i just have to. other than that i just drive it as steady as i can - try to stay on the + side of the MPG gauge, as someone said above.
So you keep it to what, about 60?

I can do 70+ and have the MPG gauge be on the plus side sometimes.
 

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This is what I do. First I make sure my tires are properly inflated. I run 35 lbs all around and rotate every 5,000 miles. Alignment is good. Regular fuel (87 octane) only. I have no external mods such as mud flaps or roof baskets etc. When starting the XV first thing in the morning, it idles for maybe 30 seconds at most before I'm driving down the road. I garage mine so I don't have to worry about melting any frost or ice in the winter. My commute (which starts at 3 am) has me driving down a four lane highway at the speed limit of 45 mph. By the time I turn onto the freeway which about 8 miles, the engine is completely warmed up and I up to 60 mph (on a 55 mph limit). I use cruise control whenever I can even when driving 45 mph. There are times where I won't use it due to traffic or slick conditions. On the return home commute, it's early afternoon so I run into much more traffic then at 3 am. I usually don't drive over 60-65 mph in the Portland area (or you're just asking for a ticket).

During my 4,000 mile road-trip to the South Dakota Badlands and Yellowstone NP this previous May, I didn't drive over 70 mph on the freeway as I wanted a relaxed trip to see the countryside. I was still passing plenty of people even when the posted speed limit was 80 mph.
 

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Okay, I've tried that, but here's a question: when you have to go up a hill or get up to speed, do you drag it out and take it really easy, do it as quickly as possible without overshooting, or something modest/in between?
On my return home commute, there is a hill with a 6% grade that goes for 3 miles. I'm usually going up the hill at 55-60 mph along with the rest of the traffic.
 

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Okay, I've tried that, but here's a question: when you have to go up a hill or get up to speed, do you drag it out and take it really easy, do it as quickly as possible without overshooting, or something modest/in between?
For getting up to speed, slow and easy acceleration saves gas, getting up to speed quickly buries the mpg needle in the negative zone and wastes it. Before you get to the hill increase your speed a little while it's easy to do that (without going into ticket territory). Then only use as much throttle as is necessary to maintain your usual cruising speed. Even better, let your speed fall to 1-3 mph below your usual cruising speed on an uphill.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have stock mudflaps, I can't imagine they're what's costing me so many mpg. I have aero bars but I only put them on if I have something up on the roof.
 

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Very interesting website on speed vs consumption. My last [3] fill-ups were with 93 Octane. Same exact commute each day and evening for the last 5 fill-ups. Same traffic. I ran Ethanol Free last tank @ $2.669 gallon US. Achieved 31.63 mpg. Tank previous was 93 Octane w/Ethanol @ $2.399 US and achieved 31.39 mpg. I'm on the fence for the moment and will buy BJ's Premium 93 Octane at considerable discount [almost at the regular 87 octane local prices]. See how that works. Sooner or later I'll throw in an 87 Octane batch for a bit and see if my mileage drops as it did on the 10/23/15 fill up @ 27.87 mpg. For the moment the engine is breaking in and I like the results of 93 octane, especially for the price at the Club discount rates [almost matching street RUG]. If I drive below the speed limits around here there's little chance of survival. My speeds are as posted and as said previously by other members here, drive like you have a full cup of water sitting on the dash. Easy on, easy off the Go-Pedal. Judge your traffic lights and distances, anytime your foot is off the gas it's good. Anytime you're hard braking - you're wasting fuel.

Mpg For Speed - Fuel Efficiency Vs. Speed
 

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Very interesting website on speed vs consumption. My last [3] fill-ups were with 93 Octane. Same exact commute each day and evening for the last 5 fill-ups. Same traffic. I ran Ethanol Free last tank @ $2.669 gallon US. Achieved 31.63 mpg. Tank previous was 93 Octane w/Ethanol @ $2.399 US and achieved 31.39 mpg. I'm on the fence for the moment and will buy BJ's Premium 93 Octane at considerable discount [almost at the regular 87 octane local prices]. See how that works. Sooner or later I'll throw in an 87 Octane batch for a bit and see if my mileage drops as it did on the 10/23/15 fill up @ 27.87 mpg. For the moment the engine is breaking in and I like the results of 93 octane, especially for the price at the Club discount rates [almost matching street RUG]. If I drive below the speed limits around here there's little chance of survival. My speeds are as posted and as said previously by other members here, drive like you have a full cup of water sitting on the dash. Easy on, easy off the Go-Pedal. Judge your traffic lights and distances, anytime your foot is off the gas it's good. Anytime you're hard braking - you're wasting fuel.

Mpg For Speed - Fuel Efficiency Vs. Speed
Interesting read. I think it's more than just that. If you look at the average MPH over a tank of fuel, you'll note that generally, the higher your average MPH, the higher your MPG. That's generally speaking of course. My average MPH was usually in the mid to high 30's which accounts for the stop-n-go traffic that everyone runs into. So generally speaking, if you can adjust your route to where you have fewer stops, you should experience higher MPG. By tracking the number off your digital display, you'll be able to see the correlation between the two. Your other points are very good. I'm always coasting whenever possible in the city; I don't feel the need to race up to a traffic signal before stopping. Idling while sitting still is probably one the biggest killers of MPG especially when the engine is cold.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I add my avg speed to every fill up on fuelly, but since we can't trust the mpg readout on our display, I wonder how useful or accurate the average speed numbers are.
 

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Okay, I've tried that, but here's a question: when you have to go up a hill or get up to speed, do you drag it out and take it really easy, do it as quickly as possible without overshooting, or something modest/in between?
Truthfully, I dont do anything special. I drive normally up the hill. If I have to step on it, i will step on it. I do not hypermile.
 

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I've noticed that the initial warm-up period after the car hasn't been driven for a few hours takes a heavy toll on the fuel economy numbers on any given trip - ie on a trip of 10 miles (16 km) or less in city driving, the fuel economy numbers are about 25% to 30% if you include in first 3 minutes of your drive (ie if you drive for 3 minutes so that the engine gets to operating temperature, turn off the ignition to reset the trip fuel economy and then start up again, then the average fuel economy for the trip is 25% or so better).

I wonder how many people (especially in the Winter time) who get better fuel economy numbers keep their car in a heated garage versus those who don't. I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are in that heated garage.
 

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Simple: Drive to keep the MPG needle on the plus side of that gauge whenever possible. Whenever it's on the negative side your MPG average is declining.
Thank you captain obvious :D
 

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I add my avg speed to every fill up on fuelly, but since we can't trust the mpg readout on our display, I wonder how useful or accurate the average speed numbers are.
I checked the speedo against my GPS and it was spot on so I assume it was more accurate than the avg mpg readout. Fewer variables involved I think.
 

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I've noticed that the initial warm-up period after the car hasn't been driven for a few hours takes a heavy toll on the fuel economy numbers on any given trip - ie on a trip of 10 miles (16 km) or less in city driving, the fuel economy numbers are about 25% to 30% if you include in first 3 minutes of your drive (ie if you drive for 3 minutes so that the engine gets to operating temperature, turn off the ignition to reset the trip fuel economy and then start up again, then the average fuel economy for the trip is 25% or so better).

I wonder how many people (especially in the Winter time) who get better fuel economy numbers keep their car in a heated garage versus those who don't. I wouldn't be surprised if many of them are in that heated garage.
Mine is (or was) kept in a separate unheated garage so I wouldn't have to deal with defrosting it in the morning. But it makes me wonder how much a block heater would help.....
 
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