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Oil change question for 2024

4702 Views 113 Replies 33 Participants Last post by  ProfMonkey
planning on ordering a '24 Limited soon, but wanted to do some homework as i plan ahead. can any of the first owners of the '24 Crosstrek answer the following?

  • what oil weight is used (rumor suggests 0w16?)?
  • is the drain plug accessible without removing any bottom/skid plate?
  • what is the oil capacity?
  • what model/partnumber subaru oil filter does the car use?
  • crush washer part number? (hoping it's the same as all other subarus)

i'm wanting to confirm that many of the things will carry over from my 2012 Impreza. i'm hoping i don't have to remove a skid plate to change the oil. not the end of the world if i do, but it's extra time that i dislike when i do it on my wife's CR-V. i can change the oil on 2012 quite quickly due to the easy oil filter location and drain plug being readily accessible.
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Three years so 200K/yr. He is, or was, a medical courier. I don't know if he was delivering body parts or supplies. From his posts it seems it was mostly highway.
As I assumed, his engine didn't die because of too much highway driving with thin oil.
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And changes at 10K. He posted some Blackstone results, too.
Yes, but Wolverine put on 10,000 miles in a month, or thereabouts.
Yes, but Wolverine put on 10,000 miles in a month, or thereabouts.
Certainly the most extreme I've ever read about. He wouldn't have to worry about fuel contamination.

It's funny how oil threads blowup. The warranty manual has the manufacturer's recommendations.
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Yes, but Wolverine put on 10,000 miles in a month, or thereabouts.
Even more evidence that it's cold starts that ultimately kill an engine.
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Here we drive a 2016 Crosstrek with really few miles, just over 18k miles over six almost seven years of use. Always Mobil 1 5w30 every year, around 3k miles per change of oil and filter each time. This Xv lives at 8200 feet over sea level and climate around 68f rarely reach 32f. No oil usage so far, oil never loses an ounce. Owner麓s manual recommends 0w20 oil. We are planing change to Mobil 1 0w20 oil, next oil change. This is my son麓s vehicle.

On the other side, and at sea level and much warmer, around 60-95f all year long, my wife and I drive two 2019 Toyotas, a Camry and a Rav4 both 2.5 liters 4cyl engines. This two vehicles used 5W30 dino oil from Toyota dealer since brand new until last year that I change it my self and used what owner麓s manual recommends: 0w16 oil, from Mobil 1. When I switch oils, I measure oil temperature development from first start in the morning to reach normal engine temprarature, my results were: 0w16 oil stay 2 to 3 f cooler than same use with 5w30 oil. Miles per gallon are about the same with both oils on both vehicles even on hot summer. No use of oil so far, at 5k miles oil changes.

All three vehicles are city driving, except the Camry that I have reach 120 mph in a nice hwy to local airport, it drives beautifully and very silent with 0w16 Mobil 1 oil.

One thing that is very important in this engines (Subaru FB20 and Toyota A25A) is the variable valve time system that both engines use, and IMOO one of the main reason car manufacturers recommend thin oils now a days.

This is my own experience that I gladly share with this marvelous forum, best wishes from M茅xico my friends.
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Here we drive a 2016 Crosstrek with really few miles, just over 18k miles over six almost seven years of use. Always Mobil 1 5w30 every year, around 3k miles per change of oil and filter each time. This Xv lives at 8200 feet over sea level and climate around 68f rarely reach 32f. No oil usage so far, oil never loses an ounce. Owner麓s manual recommends 0w20 oil. We are planing change to Mobil 1 0w20 oil, next oil change. This is my son麓s vehicle.

On the other side, and at sea level and much warmer, around 60-95f all year long, my wife and I drive two 2019 Toyotas, a Camry and a Rav4 both 2.5 liters 4cyl engines. This two vehicles used 5W30 dino oil from Toyota dealer since brand new until last year that I change it my self and used what owner麓s manual recommends: 0w16 oil, from Mobil 1. When I switch oils, I measure oil temperature development from first start in the morning to reach normal engine temprarature, my results were: 0w16 oil stay 2 to 3 f cooler than same use with 5w30 oil. Miles per gallon are about the same with both oils on both vehicles even on hot summer. No use of oil so far, at 5k miles oil changes.

All three vehicles are city driving, except the Camry that I have reach 120 mph in a nice hwy to local airport, it drives beautifully and very silent with 0w16 Mobil 1 oil.

One thing that is very important in this engines (Subaru FB20 and Toyota A25A) is the variable valve time system that both engines use, and IMOO one of the main reason car manufacturers recommend thin oils now a days.

This is my own experience that I gladly share with this marvelous forum, best wishes from M茅xico my friends.
Good to know! You could also have the oil tested when you change it to see if you could go longer next time.
What puzzles me is this page from the 2024 manual. It says the "following table"... so where is this table or am I misunderstanding something?
I'm in Phoenix, so we have "hot" weather. 0W-16 seems way too thin in 115 degree weather. The manual states "in hot weather, oil of higher viscosity is required to properly lubricate the engine.
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What puzzles me is this page from the 2024 manual. It says the "following table"... so where is this table or am I misunderstanding something?
I'm in Phoenix, so we have "hot" weather. 0W-16 seems way too thin in 115 degree weather. The manual states "in hot weather, oil of higher viscosity is required to properly lubricate the engine.
View attachment 316729
They may have reorganized the manuals and forgotten to update the wording. The warranty manual has a table that includes oil changes.

The thinner oils may have more to do with meeting CAFE standards. Much debate about THAT here...
I'm in Phoenix, so we have "hot" weather. 0W-16 seems way too thin in 115 degree weather. The manual states "in hot weather, oil of higher viscosity is required to properly lubricate the engine.
I'm in the Tucson area with two Subarus spec'd for 0W20. FWIW I run 0W30 in the summer.
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I'm in the Tucson area with two Subarus spec'd for 0W20. FWIW I run 0W30 in the summer.
The number after the W is the viscosity at operating temperature, so it shouldn't matter if you're in Anchorage or Phoenix.
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The number after the W is the viscosity at operating temperature, so it shouldn't matter if you're in Anchorage or Phoenix.
Then why would Subaru say "Oils of lower viscosity provide better fuel economy. However, in hot weather, oil of higher viscosity is required to properly lubricate the engine."
Can you enlighten me as maybe I'm missing something?
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Then why would Subaru say "Oils of lower viscosity provide better fuel economy. However, in hot weather, oil of higher viscosity is required to properly lubricate the engine."
Can you enlighten me as maybe I'm missing something?
Lower viscosity oils will impede the engine less but not protect it as well. It's one way automakers are struggling to meet CAFE standards.
Lower viscosity oils will impede the engine less but not protect it as well. It's one way automakers are struggling to meet CAFE standards.
So for my Phoenix summer (hell) application it would be a good choice to run a 0W-20 or 0W-30 as SubaruBill does in Tucson.
So for my Phoenix summer (hell) application it would be a good choice to run a 0W-20 or 0W-30 as SubaruBill does in Tucson.
A lot of engine wear occurs at startup before the oil begins circulating. Lower weight oils will have drained off more. The number before the W is the weight when cold so they should be the same. The number after the W is the viscosity at operating temps which should be the same if you're in Phoenix in the summer or Anchorage in the winter.

5W-something may be good for Phoenix.
So you are saying that for us in a hell-hot climate, a 5W is more beneficial than a W30? (not arguing)
So you are saying that for us in a hell-hot climate, a 5W is more beneficial than a W30? (not arguing)
More of a question. Operating temps should be similar if you're in Alaska in the winter or Phoenix in the summer but the starting temp will be very different.
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More of a question. Operating temps should be similar if you're in Alaska in the winter or Phoenix in the summer but the starting temp will be very different.
This is what I was thinking. The cooling system keeps the engine at a consistent temperature regardless of outside temp.

The argument that higher viscosity oils make a thicker layer between engine parts and therefore protect better is a valid one in theory.

But somehow Wolverine's Crosstrek engine went 600K miles on the Subaru recommended 0W-20 oil with his 10K mile oil changes.

At the other end of the spectrum, a thinner oil will protect better during cold starts in sub freezing weather. The other thing I see is that an oil that makes your car more fuel efficient will mean that engine is doing less work in a given time which means better longevity.
This is what I was thinking. The cooling system keeps the engine at a consistent temperature regardless of outside temp.

The argument that higher viscosity oils make a thicker layer between engine parts and therefore protect better is a valid one in theory.

But somehow Wolverine's Crosstrek engine went 600K miles on the Subaru recommended 0W-20 oil with his 10K mile oil changes.

At the other end of the spectrum, a thinner oil will protect better during cold starts in sub freezing weather. The other thing I see is that an oil that makes your car more fuel efficient will mean that engine is doing less work in a given time which means better longevity.
Too many variables for us mere mortals, LOL!

CAFE probably has the manufacturers sacrificing engine longevity. Short-sighted in my opinion.
With regards to 20 vs 30....

From a research paper shared by someone on the Outback forum:

Engine wear at normal operating temperature, and with recommended oil, is minimal unless there's a manufacturing defect.

An older field study of NYC taxi cabs found that if wear occurs due to an oil being too thin it's almost always significant and will greatly reduce the life of the engine. The researchers concluded that there is a critical line between sufficient thickness and too thin - some engines with the thinnest oil in the test were completely fine while others detonated prematurely. The oil parameter that primarily determines this critical point is the High Temp - High Shear value.

IF the engine is able to keep the oil close to operating temperature (100C/212F) then the recommended oil (0W-20) will provide the necessary protection if it isn't too old and broken down from use. ie it maintains close to the viscosity that it's rated for when new.

IF the oil temperature goes above the operating temperature it will become thinner. When too hot/thin becomes a problem will depend on the engine components (tolerances, materials, forces, etc), the formulation of the oil and how degraded it has become from use.

Being in hot climates, towing, driving at high speed or altitude, are all conditions that CAN overwhelm the engine's cooling system and may necessitate a grade higher (30) oil.

If you live in a hot climate but your oil is maintaining the correct temperature then all you need to worry about is doing oil changes before the oil is spent/degraded.

If you're driving such that the oil is going much beyond those temperatures, then a 0W-30 or 5W-30 will protect against wear due to oil thinning at high temperature. A 5W-30 at 230F will have the same viscosity as a 0w-20 at 212F.

With regards to 0W vs 5W, the 0W will provide slightly better wear protection and fuel economy while the oil is below operating temperature, but unless it's SEVERE cold (Alaska in February) it's going to be a minimal difference in wear.

0W-30 oil will probably have higher quality base oils than 5w-30, but may have more viscosity modifiers that could wear out sooner.

The difference between 0W-20 and 5w-30 sounds like a lot, but it's actually quite small.

A xW-40 oil would only be necessary if you're doing something truly extremely like towing in the desert up a grade at high speed, at which point you should be more worried about the transmission.

Someone shared their UOA from a Toyota Tundra that towed a 14000lb trailer through summer heat and mountains for over 5k miles on the recommended 0W-20 and it showed as close to zero wear as possible - literally a few ppm of wear metals. Yes, the engine was designed with a cooling system to handle towing, but the point is that 0W-20 will provide sufficient (excellent) protection if kept at normal operating temperature.


I share people's frustration with Subaru over not providing guidance with regards to what should be used if you're experiencing high operating temperatures. When towing in summer heat with my Outback I've had the oil temperature approach 110C/230F. It was briefly and I don't expect it caused excess wear, but I will now be using 5W-30 if I know I'll be towing on hot days.

Keep in mind that 5W-30 is still in the Japanese manual as an acceptable oil so if you have any concerns about 0W-20 being able to handle the heat you can rest assured that there are lots of happy Crosstreks running 5W-30.
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CAFE probably has the manufacturers sacrificing engine longevity.
This has yet to be proven.
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