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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone - I don't know squat about cars. :)

I own a 2018 Subaru Crosstrek with less than 10,000 miles on it. Yes, that mileage is correct. I work from home and only put a few thousand miles a year on my vehicles. Historically I've only driven the car a couple hundred miles (at most!) in any given week. The car is garaged when not driven, serviced as recommended, and has never had any sort of mechanical issue at all. I love this car.

The current market is strong for used cars, and I can get almost what I paid for that car in 2018 if I sell it right now. I've looked into ordering a 2023 Crosstrek, and I can get a brand new car for just a few thousand out of pocket. It sort-of seems like a no brainer....except I really like my current car and don't want to spend a couple thousand on a new car right now if I don't have to.

I'm considering doing it anyway, because I occasionally have to drive a few hundred miles away on my own, and that trip takes me through some sketchy areas. I never want to break down along the way.

So my question, for people who know more about this than me and yet have no vested interest in selling me a new car - do you have any thoughts about the reliability of a 2018 Crosstrek with 10,000 miles on it, vs. a brand new 2023? If the sole deciding factor are the chances of a mechanical failure, what would you recommend?

Really appreciate any thoughts, and thank you!
 

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2021 Crosstrek Limited, Crystal Black Silica, Black Interior, 2016 VW Touareg Luxury
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A 2018 with only 10K is practically a brand new car. Unless you just absolutely want a new car (and it doesn't sound like you do) then keep the 2018. You also stated that it's serviced as recommended, which even further reduces the chances of having a break down. Just make sure you keep an eye on the tires as they will degrade regardless of the miles.

My recommendation . . . keep the 2018 and the extra few thousand of your money.

Oh, and I appreciate the fact that you think I'm smarter than you. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is incredibly helpful, thank you so much!! And trust me, I can virtually guarantee you know more about cars then I do. :ROFLMAO: I know where the gas goes, I can refill the window washer fluid, and I can indeed check my own oil. Beyond that I'm clueless!! LOL.

This has been a solid car, zero issues. It seems to have high reliability ratings, but I am out of my element trying to make this decision (keep the current car vs buy a new one....)
 

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The only real advantage would be you get a fresh new warranty. Whether that's worth the cost difference to you or not.

By your post I'm assuming you don't care for upgrading to the larger engine size.
 

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2021 Crosstrek Premium 2.0 CVT
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Hi everyone - I don't know squat about cars. :)

I own a 2018 Subaru Crosstrek with less than 10,000 miles on it. Yes, that mileage is correct. I work from home and only put a few thousand miles a year on my vehicles. Historically I've only driven the car a couple hundred miles in any given week. The car is garaged when not driven, serviced as recommended, and has never had any sort of mechanical issue at all. I love this car.

The current market is strong for used cars, and I can get almost what I paid for that car in 2018 if I sell it right now. I've looked into ordering a 2023 Crosstrek, and I can get a brand new car for just a few thousand out of pocket. It sort-of seems like a no brainer....except I really like my current car and don't want to spend a couple thousand on a new car right now if I don't have to.

I'm considering doing it anyway, because I occasionally have to drive a few hundred miles away on my own, and that trip takes me through some sketchy areas. I never want to break down along the way.

So my question, for people who know more about this than me and yet have no vested interest in selling me a new car - do you have any thoughts about the reliability of a 2018 Crosstrek with 10,000 miles on it, vs. a brand new 2023? If the sole deciding factor are the chances of a mechanical failure, what would you recommend?

Really appreciate any thoughts, and thank you!
My personal choice if I were in your shoes? Keep the 2018 with 10k miles. It’s essential still brand new. And still under some warranties for another year,

The 2023 may have some minor changes that cause electrical or accessory problems - which yours clearly does not have yet. Any issues with the 2018 have been found and recalled or TSBd. If you do run into a issue with your current car, it probably has happened before and it will be reasonably quickly fixed.

the 2023 may have new issues of its own, although not quite as much a concern as a whole model refresh year where drivetrain and more prominent components such as suspension and such are completely changed. The 2023 is a minor refresh, but still, the probability of a minor issue popping up due to the changes that have been made seems higher than sticking with a 2018 that has four years of users reporting issues and getting them fixed. That was an excellent model year for the Crosstrek as well.

for Reliability - keep 2018
For financial - keep 2018
for the new warranty - get 2023 (not worth)
For a couple new features - get 2023

I think you’ve got a gem here… yes the used market is high, but if your mileage continues to stay that low, the car will still be worth a lot in upcoming years - Crosstrek holds highest resale value for more than a couple years now I believe. They’re a highly sought after vehicle, and especially with low miles like yours will have in a few years if you decide to upgrade eventually, it will sell for a good price. No need to feel rushed to do it now based on market volatility. You’ve got a great little car that’s basically still new, no need to incur debt / spend cash when you’ve got a tank of a car that’s serving you well and will continue to for years to come!
 

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My wife has a 2016 Impreza Limited Sedan, current mileage 16.5k... I thought she was leading the pack. You have her beat .... Well played.
She works from home extensively and is very happy with its needs... i.e. gas/oil/etc.

If no mechanical issues with the 2018, keep it. Plus lower insurance rates as that can be a (minimal) deciding factor.

My $.02
 

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2021 Crosstrek Premium 2.0 CVT
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a few thousand dollars for a car that's five years newer is a no-brainer for me
For those with a raccoon attraction to newer and shiny, sure. For the rest who are happy with things that work and want to save a few thousand dollars (especially in economic turmoil with inflation and a recession on the horizon) it makes more sense to keep calm and hold on to the car they’ve got.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is so very helpful everyone, you have no idea how much I appreciate everyone weighing in.

You are correct that a larger engine holds no appeal for me - as long as the car goes when I push the gas pedal I'm happy. Having a new warranty would be nice, but my primary concern is more with reliability (i.e.,, I just don't want to break down on the highway in a skeevy place) than the potential costs of repairs.

As far as a shiny new car - my current car is still pretty darned shiny and new. :ROFLMAO: I keep it super-clean, I've waxed it a few times every year, there are no exterior dings and only a few very tiny scratches. I also don't have kids and the dog only rides in the car once a year to the vets, so the inside is also pristine. I have a 2018 that literally looks showroom new. I love that car.

The sole reason I would buy a new car right now is if it substantially decreases the chances of a mechanical failure while I'm on one of my road trips. What I am hearing is that a 2018 with 10,000 miles which is well-maintained and never treated roughly is not much different in terms of risk than a new 2023.

If that's true, then I'm keeping my couple thousand in my bank account and will continue to love my current car for awhile longer.

Again, truly appreciate everyone weighing in. Thank you!
 

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2021 Crosstrek, 2.5 Liter, Pure Red, Limited
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So my question, for people who know more about this than me and yet have no vested interest in selling me a new car - do you have any thoughts about the reliability of a 2018 Crosstrek with 10,000 miles on it, vs. a brand new 2023? If the sole deciding factor are the chances of a mechanical failure, what would you recommend?
Several thoughts.

First: Your 2018 is getting up to the point where you should consider replacing the battery. At least have it tested to see what condition it is in. (Car battery's don't last long.)

Second: You might want to have the spare tire air pressure checked. One would think that the dealership would check that, but I wouldn't count on it!

Third. You might want to check this site and see how much a windshield replacement for a 2023 cost verses what it costs for your 2018.

Personally, I would keep the 2018 and drive at least 100k before getting something new. My bet is that before you get 30k on the 2018, EV's will be the preferred choice!

Hope this helps!

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Skyfix, that actually helps a ton.

I do have a new battery. The car sat for a few weeks over this past winter without me starting it, and when I tried to start it....nada. I had a new battery put in then.

As far as the spare tire - THANK YOU! It never even occurred me to check that. Oops. Great advice.

You're probably right about EVs. Considering it took me 4 years to get to 10k, it'll be another ~8 before I hit 30k. We may have flying cars by then....ha.
 

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My 2018 recently topped 13,000 miles. There are no long road trips to be done on the island even though it is The Big Island.

I agree with those who urge sticking with the known car that has been reliable, is maintained and garaged, and that you "really like." A replacement might be even better, but some, perhaps a small, percentage of any product coming off an assembly line will have problems. The only reason I could see for myself to replace a car that is in good condition and low mileage like yours would be to get important features not on your car (and the newest Crosstreks do not offer such major changes). The money you save now by not replacing will pay for a good amount of maintenance to keep the '18 dependable.
 

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2021 Crosstrek Premium 2.0 CVT
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This is so very helpful everyone, you have no idea how much I appreciate everyone weighing in.

You are correct that a larger engine holds no appeal for me - as long as the car goes when I push the gas pedal I'm happy. Having a new warranty would be nice, but my primary concern is more with reliability (i.e.,, I just don't want to break down on the highway in a skeevy place) than the potential costs of repairs.

As far as a shiny new car - my current car is still pretty darned shiny and new. :ROFLMAO: I keep it super-clean, I've waxed it a few times every year, there are no exterior dings and only a few very tiny scratches. I also don't have kids and the dog only rides in the car once a year to the vets, so the inside is also pristine. I have a 2018 that literally looks showroom new. I love that car.

The sole reason I would buy a new car right now is if it substantially decreases the chances of a mechanical failure while I'm on one of my road trips. What I am hearing is that a 2018 with 10,000 miles which is well-maintained and never treated roughly is not much different in terms of risk than a new 2023.

If that's true, then I'm keeping my couple thousand in my bank account and will continue to love my current car for awhile longer.

Again, truly appreciate everyone weighing in. Thank you!
Oh, you’re most likely going to get another 50 thousand miles without any drama. I can’t imagine you being stranded or broken down until well into the 1xx,000 mile range. Especially since you maintain it properly and check fluids etc, in all likelihood it will go past 100k without any issues let alone a break down level issue. I wouldn’t worry about it at all, in fact, less than a brand new one as I said.

most often a new car will have issues in the first couple thousand miles, (and) or later on in life. If you’ve had none so far and it’s at 10k, it almost certainly has more life to go problem free. Enjoy your basically new car and the extra jingle in your pocket you’re not wasting on keeping up with the joneses 😜
 

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Just curious, did you have all the recalls completed on your 2018? There have been several updates since that model came out.

Personally, I'd get the new car. 5 model years newer could possibly pay off if and when the market gets back to normal. Something to think about. That 2018 may not be worth anything near what the 2023 would be in a few years if prices normalize when you go to trade. As long as they are not raping you on price of the 2023, to me it's a no brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have had all the recalls completed. I think there were maybe 4 or so (right...?), and I started to get nervous because I got like 2 or 3 in quick succession a few years ago. There was a brief period when I thought maybe I had a lemon, LOL...

All the recall work was done. Zero issues, either before or after. Car has never had any sort of hiccup, weird issue, funky sound, vibration, hesitation...nothing. Literally the only problem was the dead battery this winter, which was probably more my fault that I didn't start it for a few weeks when it was eleven million degrees below zero here in NY.
 

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I have had all the recalls completed. I think there were maybe 4 or so (right...?), and I started to get nervous because I got like 2 or 3 in quick succession a few years ago. There was a brief period when I thought maybe I had a lemon, LOL...

All the recall work was done. Zero issues, either before or after. Car has never had any sort of hiccup, weird issue, funky sound, vibration, hesitation...nothing. Literally the only problem was the dead battery this winter, which was probably more my fault that I didn't start it for a few weeks when it was eleven million degrees below zero here in NY.
I’m in lake placid NY area. I know the weather can be a jerk on our vehicles lol.
If you’re happy with your car and you like not spending money you don’t need to, just keep your basic at new car that’s zero issue and non problematic - which you self admittedly love.
Be confident your car is a good one, since it clearly is, and that your money saved by not chasing the latest and greatest will more than cover repairs for a long time at the mileage rate you put on!
 

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For those with a raccoon attraction to newer and shiny, sure. For the rest who are happy with things that work and want to save a few thousand dollars (especially in economic turmoil with inflation and a recession on the horizon) it makes more sense to keep calm and hold on to the car they’ve got.
everyone has a different financial situation, and to be able to get almost all your money back on a 5-year-old car is a once in a lifetime opportunity that i'd take in a heartbeat
 

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everyone has a different financial situation, and to be able to get almost all your money back on a 5-year-old car is a once in a lifetime opportunity that i'd take in a heartbeat
I did it myself, I sold my perfectly good Tacoma for 23k when it was previously worth 16k. The market got crazy and I capitalized on the profit to be made off my truck that I’d never have a chance to do again. The difference is a lot smaller when it’s Crosstrek to Crosstrek, and a matter of a couple features and 10k miles. I’m fairly certain the $3-$4k cost of upgrading despite a good trade in is not worth the depreciation that will come as the economy tanks further. Better to hold onto equities we have than accrue more that will depreciate. Especially items that depreciate faster than rain can fall, like cars.
 
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