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I've used Rain-x for years. After reading some of the above responses, I believe this simple question has been blown out of proportion. If you apply Rain-x treatment, you have to buff it after it has dried. Just like wax. As far as affecting the Eyesight function, a dirty windshield would probably cause more problems than Rain-x.
If you read my original post in this thread, I'm not actually making a judgment on Rain-X. You may or may not be right. What I'm questioning is the logic employed here and in lots of other threads when folks have stuck cameras or GPS units on the dash, or bug deflectors or lights on the hood and say that because Eyesight hasn't shut off or complained that it must be working perfectly. I don't believe that's case. Even if Eyesight has only been degraded by a small amount, it could make the difference between hitting something (or someone) or not. As has also been pointed out, there's probably an aspect of Subaru covering all the bases to avoid liability. I just don't think it's accurate to tell someone asking for advice that because active cruise control still works, everything is fine.

I wasn't able to read the article that @Chuckster posted, as I don't subscribe to the WSJ, but I've seen similar ones.
 

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Sahuarita, Arizona USA 2019 Crosstrek Limited
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I wasn't able to read the article that @Chuckster posted, as I don't subscribe to the WSJ, but I've seen similar ones.
Google the article's title and then open the search result from the WSJ website. Then close the subscription offer pop up. I don't know why that works to get around pay walls but it usually does.
Google this: New Cars’ Pedestrian-Safety Features Fail in Deadliest Situations, Study Finds
 

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Google the article's title and then open the search result from the WSJ website. Then close the subscription offer pop up. I don't know why that works to get around pay walls but it usually does.
Google this: New Cars’ Pedestrian-Safety Features Fail in Deadliest Situations, Study Finds
Ha! I'd forgotten that trick. I now remember reading about it ages ago. It's a Google requirement for sites with paywalls for them to be included in Google searches...
 

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The irony (ad placement):

297712
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Ya gotta work on your cut-and-paste skills. Also: I don't think speed due to "more horsepower than a typical sedan" will be an issue for us Crosstrek drivers!
 

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My take is that if you felt a wonder when you first saw RainX in action - rain drops not behaving like rain on the wind screen but doing strange things like beading up and running around and even up - then imagine the Subaru Eysesight artificial intelligence getting confused because this scenario was never in its machine learning training.
I think that's what the warning is about.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
So you think Eyesight would think the car was upside-down?:D I don't know, Eyesight has to deal with the windshield wipers and the way they push water around. I'm going with what the dealership told me--no problem as long as there's no haze.
 

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My take is that if you felt a wonder when you first saw RainX in action - rain drops not behaving like rain on the wind screen but doing strange things like beading up and running around and even up - then imagine the Subaru Eysesight artificial intelligence getting confused because this scenario was never in its machine learning training.
I think that's what the warning is about.
And glare at night - that comes up a lot when you Google Rain-X. It probably changes the optical properties of the windshield to some extent.
 

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Yes, glare at night is why I stopped using RainX decades ago when I first tried it.

I have always done a lot of night driving and still do which is a reason why I never tint my front windows.
 

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We just came back yesterday from a lengthy soft road trip near soda lakes on the China Lake Naval Weapons Station (we had a single day security clearance to see the Coso Mountain petroglyphs there) and within a mile the entire car had a visible, dusty, salty covering. I had the cruise control on for the paved sections. When we got to the dirt road (graded...not so bad but with about 3-4" of salt and dust on it) the car was covered with a thick layer of dirt. At one point we were moving along fairly quickly in the dirt and I noticed that EyeSight was tracking the "Escort" car in front of me as I had probably hit "resume" without thinking. It was hard to believe that EyeSight was tracking though thick blooms of dust and maintaining spacing with the cruise control. Coming back on the interstate we ran into a lot of bugs. I thought of the Subaru Forum as the windshield became covered with them's that were bugs. Eyesight/Cruise Control didn't detect the donkey we later found on a long road (the windshield was again covered with salty dust) to a ghost town but it was hard to miss and I just stopped. The donkey thought that was a good idea and continued to stand in the way so I went around it. It's probably still there, giggling, what a jack ***.
 

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.... Is that really true or is that a Subaru "we won't be held liable if you do that and there's a problem" kind of thing? Discuss.
I feel it's kind of a moot question. It's a car company, they won't be held liable for anything regardless - you can almost guarantee that you agreed to this by virtue of buying the car. As for should you not use RainX? Well, they did design the car, they know what they're doing (if anyone); so if they advise you not to; I would play it safe and not.
 

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My take is that if you felt a wonder when you first saw RainX in action - rain drops not behaving like rain on the wind screen but doing strange things like beading up and running around and even up - then imagine the Subaru Eysesight artificial intelligence getting confused because this scenario was never in its machine learning training.
I think that's what the warning is about.
I worked on an autonomous vehicle project in college. The computers in our cars and most cars use ground plane detection to determine a normal vector orientation (what way is up). Nothing on the windshield itself is seen as valid data to the cameras or computer, just noise. I think everyone is overthinking how complicated our eyesight system is (not a bad thing to be simple). Our system most certainly does not have a machine learning program itself, the computational requirements would be more than what our computer could handle and the massive amount of data needed to be stored would be overwhelming. The original testing and calibration that Subaru did may have been done with a machine learning protocol, but I’m really not sure. I’m certain that our calibration parameters for object detection are relatively static and aren’t constantly changing to develop a better and better model.

The cameras are looking for two lines with high contrast to the asphalt for lane detection and ground plane extraction. The radar detectors mounted around the vehicle are for automatic braking in close quarters and send a brake command if anything triggers them when applicable. Long distance detection is done by the cameras (and probably also radar to an extent) and it does so by simply checking if there is something above the ground plane in the projected path of the vehicle. The cameras and computer do not see the glass and should not see the glass or anything on it (after the system has been calibrated for your windshield). I am thinking that in order to determine if eyesight should be turned off, the computer looks at the number of data points it gets from really a really close distance (what would be directly on the glass) and says if that number gets too high then I turn off eyesight. There’s no reason for it to be more complicated than that.

Rain, smudges, glare, and condensation all will produce junk data points that will appear an inch from the camera. You have to determine what a safe number of junk data points is and shut off the system before you reach that limit. What I think astrocats is getting at is that every one of those junk data points is not telling you anything about what happens outside the car. If you go further into the optics of the cameras and the resolution, a single object the size of a stop sign might only take up a handful of pixels of a cameras resolution at 60ft. This is because you have a wide angle lens and the distance between the pixels gets wider as you get further from the lens. In college, getting our car to recognize objects at more than 50ft with our desired field of view was difficult. Dropping even a few pixels of data means a lot when you’re moving fast.

All of that being said, will Rainx cause a problem because of the glare? If it does cause glare, then it will cause you to lose SOME data. I think Subaru calibrated the eyesight systems well enough to know the limitations of their cameras, and programmed the eyesight system to shut off appropriately. More importantly I think that they were programmed to shut off appropriately with a safety factor in place that would compensate for a worst case scenario in data collection. As long as the rainx isn’t causing the system to turn of it should at least be working within safe parameters even if there is slightly degraded performance.


Also, I thought of posting this earlier but never did: My Subaru dealer advertises a hydrophobic coating (over the entire vehicle) that’s is applied by a third party. I immediately thought that was something that would void the eyesight warranty and just laughed out loud when I saw it at the dealer.




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Just curious, I know that the 2019 Crosstrek Limited has radar in the side mirrors and back bumper, but does it have radar facing forward? You implied this when you said "The radar detectors mounted around the vehicle are for automatic braking in close quarters and send a brake command if anything triggers them when applicable. "
 

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Just curious, I know that the 2019 Crosstrek Limited has radar in the side mirrors and back bumper, but does it have radar facing forward? You implied this when you said "The radar detectors mounted around the vehicle are for automatic braking in close quarters and send a brake command if anything triggers them when applicable. "
I looked up what I could find on sensor locations for the 18+ systems. There aren’t any forward facing radar components in the online parts guides. Radar has been used in adaptive cruise systems fairly effectively for a while. It looks like the eyesight system relies solely on the cameras to see obstacles and gauge distances. Radar will be much better at giving up-to-date distance information than cameras but is limited in its uses. Radar also would have been helpful in the front for slower speeds (there are narrow field radars that can see further than the ones in our bumper and mirrors) and in parking maneuvers (just like it is used in the rear braking).
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Follow-up: I washed the car today, clay-bar'd the windows to get off water spots (somewhat successful), then...applied Rain-X. I'll post again if it causes me to crash...
 

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I've used rain-x and other like brands and used them almost exclusively in my washer reservoir. The only time I have trouble, is when it is foggy, or when there's a huge temperature differential between the inside of the car and the outside of the windshield. In these cases, I notice the fog likes to gather around the edges and especially near eyesight cameras. Even with defrost on full, mind you that was extreme -38c outside. I also notice when driving in areas with no street lights at all, sometimes eyesight will act wonky, but I expect the result would be the same no matter what you put on your windshield.
 
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