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Not sure yet with that. I've done the remote climate control a few times from my phone and I know a few times at least the engine never came on (just ate away battery power). What's nice about it is that it runs the system and doesn't run anything else, like headlights, to let others know that your car is running. Pretty sneaky!
Just the way it should be! Though at least on the Ford, there was a bit of a whine when that electric AC compressor would really get spinning.

I'd guess if you just did a remote climate control it would fire up the ICE if it's too cold out. But you should have settings somewhere so that you can say you want to have the car charged and warm at like 7AM, right? That's the one that I wouldn't normally think would fire up the ICE but I'm not sure. And/or maybe if you did the remote climate control while plugged in...
 

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Just the way it should be! Though at least on the Ford, there was a bit of a whine when that electric AC compressor would really get spinning.

I'd guess if you just did a remote climate control it would fire up the ICE if it's too cold out. But you should have settings somewhere so that you can say you want to have the car charged and warm at like 7AM, right? That's the one that I wouldn't normally think would fire up the ICE but I'm not sure. And/or maybe if you did the remote climate control while plugged in...
Yeah, it does something like that, but you can barely hear it running even when standing in front of the car! The settings in the MySubaru app allow you to set the cabin temp and run defrost, but I don't think you can tell it ahead of time that you want it prepped by 7AM. I garage my car so I never really looked at that one closely, but I do set my charge time to finish by 5:45am so I can go to the gym in the mornings.
 

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Yeah, it does something like that, but you can barely hear it running even when standing in front of the car! The settings in the MySubaru app allow you to set the cabin temp and run defrost, but I don't think you can tell it ahead of time that you want it prepped by 7AM. I garage my car so I never really looked at that one closely, but I do set my charge time to finish by 5:45am so I can go to the gym in the mornings.
Hmm, the manual is slightly vague, but looking here:

On page 58 with some other notes it says:
<<! Air conditioning-linked setting SHSAE100103 When the charging mode is set to “Departure time”, the climate control system can be set to automatically operate according to the set time. Operation starts approximately 10 minutes before the set departure time. >>
 

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Back to the main topic at hand, I stand by the comment that 6-20 is probably more than enough for these purposes.

I'm planning on a 6-20 or at most a 14-30 myself if I end up buying an EV when my lease is up. Granted, my commute is only 20 miles round trip, and I'm usually around 1000 miles total per month, but over a 12 hour charge, a 6-20 would provide me with around 130 miles of range in winter/colder months where some charge is diverted to keep/warm the battery pack, or about 180 miles in more temperate seasons (non-winter)... That's plenty for someone like me...

Regarding being more future-proof:

Teslas, for example, consume around 250-300 watts per mile. Even if you double this, you're still looking at around 500-750 watts per mile assuming Subaru (or whoever) makes a terribly inefficient EV in the future. If you're expending 1 kW per 2 miles, and you drive 50 miles per day, you're still looking at around 25 kW that needs to be replaced at the end of the day. With a 6-20 outlet (240 V * 16 A) over 12 hours, you're replenishing 46 kW - almost double.

So, if you have the option to charge it for at least 6 hours, you'll fill up what you've used in your 50 miles a day.

Again, this is a terribly inefficient example that is dramatized to show you that my intentions are to show you that manufacturers will make vehicles more efficient or as efficient as the Tesla "standard" of today...

With a 250 watts per mile example, that would consume 1 kW every 4 miles, making my 20 mile commute consume a total of 5 kW. That is replenished in under 2 hours with 6-20...

Don't make this a bigger deal than it has to be. Look, if you want to spend the money and go overkill, go for it. It's your money. I'm just saying you don't have to. Maybe, eventually, down the road they'll figure out a way to dual-charger stuff like they do with the Model S & X, but I just don't see this being necessary unless you had a full EV and it was in use constantly, like a Taxi service or company car.

For my scenario again, I leave for work around 5 AM, I'm home by 2 PM, and I can plug it in if I needed to. I bring the kids to sports in the evening or whatever activity and I can plug it in for the night after 8, and then get at least 8 hours of charging if I had to.

Smaller gauge wiring, circuit breakers, sizes of conduit, outlets, and other equipment associated with a 6-20 is less expensive than a 14-30, and a 14-30 is less expensive than a 14-50 as so on. And labor is usually cheaper too since it's easier to work with the thinner material and therefore the installation is faster.

Just my two cents.
 

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Back to the main topic at hand, I stand by the comment that 6-20 is probably more than enough for these purposes.

I'm planning on a 6-20 or at most a 14-30 myself if I end up buying an EV when my lease is up. Granted, my commute is only 20 miles round trip, and I'm usually around 1000 miles total per month, but over a 12 hour charge, a 6-20 would provide me with around 130 miles of range in winter/colder months where some charge is diverted to keep/warm the battery pack, or about 180 miles in more temperate seasons (non-winter)... That's plenty for someone like me...

Regarding being more future-proof:

Teslas, for example, consume around 250-300 watts per mile. Even if you double this, you're still looking at around 500-750 watts per mile assuming Subaru (or whoever) makes a terribly inefficient EV in the future. If you're expending 1 kW per 2 miles, and you drive 50 miles per day, you're still looking at around 25 kW that needs to be replaced at the end of the day. With a 6-20 outlet (240 V * 16 A) over 12 hours, you're replenishing 46 kW - almost double.

So, if you have the option to charge it for at least 6 hours, you'll fill up what you've used in your 50 miles a day.

Again, this is a terribly inefficient example that is dramatized to show you that my intentions are to show you that manufacturers will make vehicles more efficient or as efficient as the Tesla "standard" of today...

With a 250 watts per mile example, that would consume 1 kW every 4 miles, making my 20 mile commute consume a total of 5 kW. That is replenished in under 2 hours with 6-20...

Don't make this a bigger deal than it has to be. Look, if you want to spend the money and go overkill, go for it. It's your money. I'm just saying you don't have to. Maybe, eventually, down the road they'll figure out a way to dual-charger stuff like they do with the Model S & X, but I just don't see this being necessary unless you had a full EV and it was in use constantly, like a Taxi service or company car.

For my scenario again, I leave for work around 5 AM, I'm home by 2 PM, and I can plug it in if I needed to. I bring the kids to sports in the evening or whatever activity and I can plug it in for the night after 8, and then get at least 8 hours of charging if I had to.

Smaller gauge wiring, circuit breakers, sizes of conduit, outlets, and other equipment associated with a 6-20 is less expensive than a 14-30, and a 14-30 is less expensive than a 14-50 as so on. And labor is usually cheaper too since it's easier to work with the thinner material and therefore the installation is faster.

Just my two cents.
I think it comes down to your individual circumstances. I tend to agree with going with more than you need right now so as not to have to redo it again. I got my evse when there was a tax credit but used a 120v extension cord and another 120v outlet on the other phase to make a 240v outlet for maybe a year before we were doing work on the house anyway and had to do major rework on our electrical since we had 200 amp service but electric heat so on a cold Winter day we could max out that without charging. Let alone that the box was already full and no 240v out to the garage. So we stepped up to 320/400 amp service, a few more boxes, buried cable, etc. So we now have 100 amps to the garage. It would be a bit silly from my stand point to do all that and then put in something that only gets me 20 amps out there.

I wanted to make it capable for 2 cars at Max but if I ever got Tesla's that gets pretty crazy.

The other factor is the likelihood of moving to a new house, etc.

Realistically when the Crosstrek's heat pump I don't really think I'd bother upgrading. It would basically just enable a few more 2 charge per day options which is about one a week for me. But if it's just an air cooled battery there's a good chance multiple charges per day are going to lower it's capacity faster. Especially in hot climates.
 

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Only if you have an electric dryer. All my appliances are gas except for my air conditioning and refrigerator ;)

I make do with 100A service but you should probably do a load test.
 

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My bad, you are correct R P. The 14-30 is dryer and 14-50 is oven. One advantage of installing a 14-50 in your garage is the circuit amperage of 50 amps with a max output of 40 amps. For example: the max charge rate of a Tesla Model 3 is 32 amps.
 

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My bad, you are correct R P. The 14-30 is dryer and 14-50 is oven. One advantage of installing a 14-50 in your garage is the circuit amperage of 50 amps with a max output of 40 amps. For example: the max charge rate of a Tesla Model 3 is 32 amps.
I installed a 14-50R receptacle in my garage. Total cost of parts, incl wiring was about 40 bucks. I installed mine close to the panel, so wiring runs were short. I used #6 wire, so can go up to a 50A breaker. But because my L2 EVSE is only 32A, I just have a 40A breaker for now. But I am future proofed to go higher if I want.

EVSEs are getting cheaper and cheaper now. I paid $450 for mine last year, (now can get it for $350). It can be also be used with 120V which is useful for RV sites (need an adapter). Also, what many people don't realize is that your 120V EVSE that comes with your car can be used with 240V (again with proper adapter). Because EU and other places use 240, they manufactured them for both, and just use different plug ends for different countries (standar 120V for US/Canada).

Here is a good site for making your own adapters if you want to save money. I made my own RV adapter, and can now charge at 30A at a 120V RV TT-30 site.
 

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RP, sounds like you have a nice set up. That is exactly what I did, I contacted Rob43 at PriusForum. There are multiple Prius Prime members have purchased a 120v to 240v adaptor cable from him for around $50.

I’ve previously owned a 2018 Prius Prime and the Crosstrek hybrid 8.8kw battery is exactly the same as Prius. Standard charging time of 5-6 hours will be reduced down to around 2 and a half hours (you will need to have an existing 240v outlet)

Most aftermarket chargers (JuiceBox or Clipper Creek) cost $400-800. Rob43 adaptor is a cheaper alternative while using oem cable for 240v charging. I’m not a Electrical Engineer so buy at your own risk.

I know finall assembly of Crosstrek is at the Yajima plant, Ota Japan. R P what model year Crosstrek Hybrid do you have? is the Canadian market Crosstrek PHEV any different than US market?
 

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RP, sounds like you have a nice set up. That is exactly what I did, I contacted Rob43 at PriusForum. There are multiple Prius Prime members have purchased a 120v to 240v adaptor cable from him for around $50.

I’ve previously owned a 2018 Prius Prime and the Crosstrek hybrid 8.8kw battery is exactly the same as Prius. Standard charging time of 5-6 hours will be reduced down to around 2 and a half hours (you will need to have an existing 240v outlet)

Most aftermarket chargers (JuiceBox or Clipper Creek) cost $400-800. Rob43 adaptor is a cheaper alternative while using oem cable for 240v charging. I’m not a Electrical Engineer so buy at your own risk.

I know finall assembly of Crosstrek is at the Yajima plant, Ota Japan. R P what model year Crosstrek Hybrid do you have? is the Canadian market Crosstrek PHEV any different than US market?
I have a 2018 Crosstrek, but not PHEV. I have a Kona EV (64 kWh battery) which is why I am so familiar with charging options. The PHEV was not available when I got my Crosstrek (fall 2017), otherwise I might have considered it. The Kona EV replaced a Prius. It is a nice long range EV, but no comparison to a Crosstrek as an SUV.

I am looking forward to see what Subaru comes out with in 2022 with a pure EV, esp if it is and SUV.
 

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Respectfully, the maximum charge rate of a Model 3 Long Range is the full 48A when used with a Tesla Wall Connector (home charger from Tesla) on a 60A breaker.

The mobile connector that is included with every Tesla will max out at 32A.

However you are talking about splitting hairs here:

even if you run into your garage on literally a 0% charge, you would be able to fully charge either way over night.
 
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