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Discussion Starter #21
Well, one thing about these Odysseys, is they accept a charge fast, and will utilize the amps available to charge up very quickly. This is especially important with my floatplane, as many flights are often quite short (when alpine lake hopping). This could be very good with the Crosstrek, too, so that when it is able to charge hard (not in Eco mode) it should charge the Odyssey up faster.
Interesting, I guess it depends how the eco charging algorithm works. It may decide that the battery is doing such a good job that it needs to be charged for even less time while driving, LOL...
 

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Discussion Starter #22
In this case his drain is coming from an additional outflow on the battery. Having additional capacity on the battery buys extra time for the accessories (dash came in this case) assuming the car has time to charge to equivalent voltage. Hopefully the other workaround fixes it, but more capacity is more capacity when charged to an equivalent voltage. I get that it does not address the undercharging issue. Real issue here is running out of charge to power dash cam. Can be solved by fixing under charing. Can be solved by additional capacity. That said, I get and agree with your point of undercharging eventually catching up to the battery.
Good points but I think I'll try disconnecting one wire from the fusebox before spending ~$300 on a new battery... :D
 

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More about the Crosstrek Odyssey battery.
https://www.batterymart.com/p-ody-35-pc1400.html
Also press the Description tab.

Costs more, but I have seen deals on them from time to time. If you have a local high volume battery shop, they probably can sell for less. Also need to consider this battery will probably outlast the lifetime of your car ownership. I am only on my 2nd Odyssey battery in my plane. First one was still going strong after 10 years, but decided for good measure to replace it anyways (found a good deal that I couldn't pass up).

Having said all that, I don't have a need for such a high quality battery in my car, with my good monitoring and maintenance practices. But others may.
 

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Well, one thing about these Odysseys, is they accept a charge fast, and will utilize the amps available to charge up very quickly. This is especially important with my floatplane, as many flights are often quite short (when alpine lake hopping). This could be very good with the Crosstrek, too, so that when it is able to charge hard (not in Eco mode) it should charge the Odyssey up faster.
It really depends on how the smart/eco charging system is built... remember that an AGM battery typicially requires a bit more voltage to get to full when charging (ie 14.6V vs 14.4V) so if the default configuration on the Crosstrek is for regular lead acid batteries, an AGM battery might be further behind the 8 ball than a regular lead acid battery as the charging voltages reported seem to be well below 14.4V let alone the ideal 14.6V for an AGM.

Now if you defeat the smart/eco charging system, then definitely, the addition of a faster charge acceptance may pay dividends (more than the stock market right now :)). One thing to note is that some people have reported that they can modify the charging system to output 14.6V which may be an option.
 

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As 13ST14XV wrote, it may not (i.e. probably won't) solve our problem as OAK's commute is only 5 miles, in traffic. Interestingly, the parking mode held up last night but she went to her book club across town so drove a lot more in the evening, and probably at speed on the freeway as she came home late, after the bad traffic. It's definitely a combination of driving habits and the eco charging, and there's only one of those I have any influence over... :D

My only concern is that the constant charging may have some other undesirable effects on the battery but I can't imagine it's any worse than it being constantly left at 50% charge.
Batteries have been charged constantly prior to smart/eco charging so I don't believe that any undesirable effects will be big.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Batteries have been charged constantly prior to smart/eco charging so I don't believe that any undesirable effects will be big.
Good to know. Just one more question... will I need to use a different weight oil because of the extra load the alternator will place on the engine?
 

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It really depends on how the smart/eco charging system is built... remember that an AGM battery typicially requires a bit more voltage to get to full when charging (ie 14.6V vs 14.4V) so if the default configuration on the Crosstrek is for regular lead acid batteries, an AGM battery might be further behind the 8 ball than a regular lead acid battery as the charging voltages reported seem to be well below 14.4V let alone the ideal 14.6V for an AGM.

Now if you defeat the smart/eco charging system, then definitely, the addition of a faster charge acceptance may pay dividends (more than the stock market right now :)). One thing to note is that some people have reported that they can modify the charging system to output 14.6V which may be an option.
Yes, AGMs generally can handle more charging amps. But the Odyssey doesn't need it. My plane just has a regular 35 (small) Denso alternator, same as what some of the old small cars (like Suzuki) used to have. Only puts out 14.4V and the Odyssey sucks the charge up really fast.

BTW, the Odyssey battery I have in the plane is the PC625 (very small) and only weighs just 13 pounds (don't want extra weight in a plane). Yet it turns a 360 cu inch high compression 4 cyl aircraft engine really quick. Amazing how much power it has in such a little package. The Crosstrek battery is much larger though (weight is not an issue), so has much higher reserve capacity.
 

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Ultimate reason to do it... The Subaru OEM batteries are junk and there is a good chance it will need replacement way sooner than it should :smileyvault-stirthe. New battery gets that out of the way now and could solve your problem.
FWIW: The OEM battery in my 05 Subaru lasted me 9 yrs+. The only reason I replaced it was because I realized it was that old. It was still working fine with only 41,000 miles on it, but I didn't want to risk being stranded some cold snowy night.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
FWIW: The OEM battery in my 05 Subaru lasted me 9 yrs+. The only reason I replaced it was because I realized it was that old. It was still working fine with only 41,000 miles on it, but I didn't want to risk being stranded some cold snowy night.
After getting "stranded" half way up a mountain in the snow a while ago, we now have Stanley Powerstations in our cars. They do so much more than jump start a battery, and we've been able to help a lot other stranded drivers, too!
 

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FWIW: The OEM battery in my 05 Subaru lasted me 9 yrs+. The only reason I replaced it was because I realized it was that old. It was still working fine with only 41,000 miles on it, but I didn't want to risk being stranded some cold snowy night.
That's one of the reasons why I got a battery tester as I'm not interested in how OLD a battery is but in what condition the battery is in now compared to what it should be. I also have one of those small Lith-ion booster packs in the car as well (which I never used on my car yet but I did help a neighbour twice).
 

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FWIW: The OEM battery in my 05 Subaru lasted me 9 yrs+. The only reason I replaced it was because I realized it was that old. It was still working fine with only 41,000 miles on it, but I didn't want to risk being stranded some cold snowy night.


Yeah, but one on my 16 Crosstrek lasted 2 years. So I wouldn't be too complacent.
 

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"You can't" means as much to me as "that's normal".

artosa
 

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If the issue is charging battery more fully, would this be a solution? https://no.co/blsolar5

My commute is very short and I used this while parked at work for my diesel Golf. If 12v power source is not on while car is off, there is a adapter that plugs into the OBDII connector.

Screen Shot 2018-12-23 at 5.50.19 PM.jpg
 

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If the issue is charging battery more fully, would this be a solution? https://no.co/blsolar5

My commute is very short and I used this while parked at work for my diesel Golf. If 12v power source is not on while car is off, there is a adapter that plugs into the OBDII connector.

View attachment 285820
In theory, yes. But that would be dependent on where the car is parked and the output of the panel. Many of these panel solutions will output enough to maintain the battery in ideal lighting conditions but may not output enough power to actually increase the state of charge on the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
If the issue is charging battery more fully, would this be a solution? https://no.co/blsolar5

My commute is very short and I used this while parked at work for my diesel Golf. If 12v power source is not on while car is off, there is a adapter that plugs into the OBDII connector.

View attachment 285820
Thanks Dezlboy, I've been wondering about that too. It may work for us as it's almost always sunny here. I'll try the free option of disabling the Eco charging first...

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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For me, with my 2013 Crosstrek I found that keeping the headlights on while driving would always keep the alternator charging the battery. Or, having the blower fan on a higher setting would work too. I verified this while watching a voltmeter plugged into the 12 V outlet. I am pretty sure after turning the car off and waiting a few minutes the battery would settle down to around 12.6 Volts.
 

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Since all this eco charge talk lately, I have been paying close attention to my charging status. I have a USB adapter with a voltage display in my front outlet. So I can always monitor my battery and charging status at any time. Lately I have not driven my Crosstrek much and only on very short trips. But did a couple longer trips this past week, and here is what I observed.

Before I started, my battery was down to 12.2V (60%), and then while driving the voltage stayed at 14.3 or 14.4V (max alternator charge rate) the whole time. Didn't matter if if I was accelerating hard, going uphill, lights on (night), or whatever, it did not budge from that charge rate. It was not until the battery was fully charged again (12.7V) that the charging voltage would vary again while driving (eco mode?). I will say that it actually took about 2 hours driving before it reached that state (seemed a little long to me).

So if there is indeed an eco mode, looks like it is smart enough to wait until your battery is fully charged or near so, before engaging. Seems to me that is what we would want.

The slower charge time says more about the battery than the charging system. I do know that some batteries will not accept a charge as quickly, especially if it has been damaged (sulfation and stratification) due to not being kept at full or near full charge.

I should mention, too, that if a discharged battery seems to charge up too quickly, that also indicates damage. And the fast charge is only a surface charge, which bleeds off quickly when powered.

Best batteries for accepting a fast charge (and many other qualities) are the Odysseys. This is the Crosstrek one.
https://www.batterymart.com/p-ody-35-pc1400.html

 
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