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No worries, I fell into the habit of shortening things a long time ago. I don’t think I’ve ever written Crosstrek here (except for now and my sig block and, it’s bothersome), I stick with XV.

I sincerely doubt Germany (or anybody) has a different engine (provided we’re still talking the FB20D). One, the model number gives it away and, two it doesn’t sound very cost effective. Basically when Subaru Deutschland orders their manuals, they use country specific details such as the minimally required octane readily available and printing language(lol).

I bet you guys wouldn’t care, I wouldn’t, it would just be confusing if manufactures starting printing it
 

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I just detected, that the octane numbers aren't that different between the USA and Europe as the numbers seem to show.

The values are measured in a different way.

In the USA, the octane number is the arithmetic mean of RON (Research Octane Number) and MON (Motor Octane Number), (ROZ+MOZ)/2

In the EU, the octane number is only the RON.

A corresponding comparison:

EU Normal octane number 91 (still available in some EU countries but not in Germany and its neighboring countries) corresponds US octane number 86.8, rounded up 87 - (RON 91 + MON 82.5)/2

EU Super octane number 95 corresponds US octane number 90 - (RON 95 + MON 85)/2

EU Super Plus octane number 98 corresponds US octane number 93 - (RON 98 + MON 88)/2

About the EU fuels Shell V-Power octane 100 and Aral Ultimate octane 102 I couldn't find a comparison.

Edited:
Following the rule (RON + MON)/2 , how the octane number is measured in the USA, the corresponding values must be:

EU Shell V-Power 100 octane corresponds US octane number 95 (RON 100 + MON 90)/2

EU Aral Ultimate 102 octane corresponds US octane Number 97 (RON 102 + MON 92)/2
 

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These cars will burn anything you put in the tank this side of #2...and with respect to injector cleaner....any solvent strong enough to clean the varnish off an injector will also eat the plastic bottle its sold in, or eat theu the plastic seal in the metal bottle its sold in.

The best injector cleaning is a heavy load for a long run down the highway
 

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These cars will burn anything you put in the tank this side of #2...and with respect to injector cleaner....any solvent strong enough to clean the varnish off an injector will also eat the plastic bottle its sold in, or eat theu the plastic seal in the metal bottle its sold in.The best injector cleaning is a heavy load for a long run down the highway

Yeah, they'll burn anything combustible that's been mixed at the proper ratio of fuel and air, in relation to the ignition source. So.. liquid combustible between 0 and 800 °C but the question is how efficient it is and what damage will it cause to a system designed for a certain octane of gasoline.

An Italian tune-up may have helped blow out some "carbon" from rich running and dirty carbureted engines but it doesn't do anything for fuel injected engines because everything is calibrated. We also have cleaner gas (please, no one start a new Top Tier thread) and oil, compared to the 1960’s, being fed into the engine which reduces deposits. If we have buildup issue, its because something is wrong with our system.

Blowing out a carbureted engine does/did nothing unless done all the time. If you Google it, you'll see many saying it works and they "have do it every X miles". They have to keep doing it because it works as well using a Band-Aid when you need stitches; it removes some deposits from the system but just stuff that's already loose so where does that all that loose "carbon" come from?

It's not the engine, as made evident by the blow-out procedure, itself. The increase in volume or rate of air moving through a car's system will not remove gummy/solid build up because the air just flows around it (causing poor performance) and the pressure at which the air flows into the engine does not increase, ever. It's like blowing on a brick to move it; it's not going to work unless you get more pressure. Running high and sudden burst RPM increases the rate and volume of material put into the system and out through the exhaust system but only the exhaust system experiences this type of building pressure, under normal conditions.

The controlled volume of material put into the engine creates a controlled volume output but once it leaves the engine, the exhaust meets external atmospheric pressure within a confined, yet open-ended system. Increasing the flow of exhaust into the system increases the volume of gasses (and their deposits within), creating pressure as it bangs though the confined area to exit the tailpipe. I.e. More RPM means more exhaust to the system and more internal pressure, just like a 1000 gal water tank will have more internal pressure but drain at the same rate as a 100 gal water tank, if they use the same discharge pipe.

While some contaminants just drop to the internal surface, some adhere to the exhaust system during travel and pressure and heat pushes contaminants into existing buildups. Stepping on the gas increases the pressure within the confined system and forces the exhaust through at a faster speed, unlike the gravity fed water tanks. This forces out loose contaminants that are light enough to be affected by the airflow. When you shut off your car, the exhaust within the system is no longer being pushed out thusly, the remaining fumes inside, remain inside leaving behind all the contaminants within and creating deposits. Flooring the gas blows out the deposits from the exhaust system because of the increasing exhaust pressure created by high RPM and that's what an Italian tune-up does. Also, note that the famed Ferrari mechanic blow-out procedure was only done after a proper tune-up... which has nothing to do with the exhaust... but included cleaning the carburator.

Our main build up, in fuel injected cars, is in the throttle body. It gets covered in dirt, varnish and carbon from fuel vapours which can gum up the works causing poor idle, poor acceleration and hesitation; all symptoms tied to the outdated blow-out procedure.





Clearly, injector cleaner does not eat its own packaging. Neither does bleach, throttle body cleaner, pesticides, drain cleaners.... and any other corrosive liquid that gets stocked on a shelf. While it may have happened in the time before science, we have these very cool things called polyethylene, polymethylpentene and polytetrafluoroethylene.

Polyethylene was first created in 1938 by a German named Perchmann. Its extremely versatile, in it's three types and is the most widely produced plastic in the world.
1. Low density polyethylene (LDPE): used to make light weight stuff like shopping bags.
2. High density polyethylene (HDPE): with a higher crystalline structure, it makes corrosion resistant containers that can withstand fluctuating temperatures without significant degradation.
3. Utltrahigh molecular weight density polyethylene (UMWPE): extremely tough and actually used in bulletproof vests.


Polymethylpentene is a thermoplastic polymer with high chemical resistance. It's what they use to make containers for things various acids and bases. You may have seen it a school laboratory as a beaker (because careless/hormone crazed students kept dropping them, I guess). It's more brittle than PE but can be made shatterproof.

Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon), created by accident in 1938, is the fluoropolymer behind Teflon. A fluoropolymer is a carbon and fluorine based polymer with multiple bonds, characterized by a high resistance to solvents, acids, and bases. The Teflon coated bottles cannot absorb the chemicals it comes into contact with and the bonds make it non-reactive to a vast majority of acids and bases.
 

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Yikes, Doca! Slow day at work, eh? :D
Lol, no. I had appointments to get to so I couldn’t bother starting anything and the statement really touched a nerve. But you know me; when something bites, I over do it just so I think everyone will fully understand what I’m saying. When I do that, I hope it generates feedback/discussion and points out any errors in my own process, so I can learn as well.
 

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Dang, ya nuked the hell out of that.

Ya made this mech-e's eyes glaze over.

Sorry, buddy, I get like that sometimes but can you imagine the stuff I don’t write? Lol.

@Robob - Thanks. 89 probably won’t hurt anything over time but the potential is still there. Higher octane burns hotter which may damage your engine. I suggest dropping back to the 87 which the engine is designed for. You’ll save money over time and, if you have one of the slightly out of spec engines and you develop a knock or ping, then go back to 89.
 
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