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My opinion: I was issued a new Outback loaner that had the Auto S/S feature... absolutely hated it. I will henceforth refer to it as the *** system. The whole car shuddered when it kicked on, at seemingly different time rates. Not seamless, consistent, nor especially... desired.

Listen friends.. I’ve been around cars for 35 years+ ... and my instincts tell me that cranking your engine over several times extra a day is a BAD idea. Wear and tear, unnecessarily. At a minimum you’re putting additional stress on the cranking system. And while the system works “ok” while the car is new, who’s to say what the system will be like after the car several years old???

The amount of fuel saved was minuscule, in my opinion not worth the extra wear and tear. Over two days I think the fuel we saved was .012 of a gallon. While you are able to bypass the feature, it is defaulted to “on”... so you have to remember to turn it off every time you start the car.

I mention this because I’m a huge fan of the Crosstrek... we own two 2016s... and I think this is a horribly unfortunate feature.

I have my eye on the 2021 Sport which looks amazing with MOAR POWER, but I’m hoping against hope that the *** feature is defaulted to either off or that you can simply pull a fuse for it.

Thoughts?


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The fuel savings are very dependent on your type of driving, in stop and go like in busy cities it saves quite a bit of fuel for the user.

The more important part is that as it becomes a standard (or required epa feature in the future) at scale when the entire fleet of world vehicles has it it saves a tremendous amount of fuel over the course of its lifetime.

Systems will get better with time and they are built with the added wear and tear in mind. Not sure how Subaru does it but some manufacturers have the car remember or have a sensor to bite where the cylinders are and just fires the correct cylinder to turn the motor over rather than using the starter.

Get used to it cause it isn’t going away.
 

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There have been lots of threads about this already. Here's one related to disabling it:

 

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the producers have to get down the CO2 emissions because of the climate (sorry here but my meaning) bullshit. S/S is one of them. Maybe if you are worried, whatever, maybe the hybrid is a solution? Here in Norway (i think all Europe) is the non chargeble hybrid available. smaller batteri, weaker electric engine… but this one let the electromotor work a lot in city with low speed…
 

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the producers have to get down the CO2 emissions because of the climate (sorry here but my meaning) bullshit. S/S is one of them. Maybe if you are worried, whatever, maybe the hybrid is a solution? Here in Norway (i think all Europe) is the non chargeble hybrid available. smaller batteri, weaker electric engine… but this one let the electromotor work a lot in city with low speed…
The climate issue isn't BS but, in my opinion, the stop/start thing to shave off a fraction of a percentage point is BS. I wish they would put that research and development time, effort and funds into finding better ways to wean us off fossil fuels. I'd like to see more hydrogen-powered vehicles on the market (which would be an incentive for more filling stations to provide hydrogen).
 

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Electric will happen before hydrogen. Electricity is available everywhere unlike hydrogen and hydrogen is very dangerous for a few reasons. I thought the same thing but electricity will be the future of cars not hydrogen.

While I agree with you they should start focusing on alternative fuels start stop is a super easy way to save fuel.
 

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Electric will happen before hydrogen. Electricity is available everywhere unlike hydrogen and hydrogen is very dangerous for a few reasons. I thought the same thing but electricity will be the future of cars not hydrogen.

While I agree with you they should start focusing on alternative fuels start stop is a super easy way to save fuel.
I agree with you as well. From what I've read, and talking to techie friends, one of the reasons they're not adopting BEVs (other than a second, fun car) is the thought of having to wait an hour or so for a charge on a trip, versus five minutes getting gas. Or, perhaps, not being able to find a charging station or, if you do, that it's occupied for the next two hours. That would be my concern, say, on a trip to the wine country, or the Sierras.

It took a while for gas stations to be ubiquitous...

I'd like to see hydrogen as a competitor. It's not going to be the Hindenburg all over again. Is it as dangerous to pump hydrogen as it is to pump such a highly volatile and flammable liquid as gasoline? I don't know.
 

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I remember back in the early 90's my brother had a little Honda 4-cylinder which got almost 45 mpg. A similar car today doesn't get too close to that number with all the emission controls. So hypothetically the MPG has been cut nearly in half due to all the emission control systems saving pollution, but you need twice as much fuel to go the same distance. My logic may be flawed, but it looks to me like a net zero. But then again we are talking about a little Honda and not the huge land yachts.
 

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I remember back in the early 90's my brother had a little Honda 4-cylinder which got almost 45 mpg. A similar car today doesn't get too close to that number with all the emission controls. So hypothetically the MPG has been cut nearly in half due to all the emission control systems saving pollution, but you need twice as much fuel to go the same distance. My logic may be flawed, but it looks to me like a net zero. But then again we are talking about a little Honda and not the huge land yachts.
You don't need a Hummer or a Range Rover to run to the local store to get a quart of milk but that's what happens here. Not sure what the solution is but if those giant SUVs were all electric (or hydrogen or whatever)...
 
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I remember back in the early 90's my brother had a little Honda 4-cylinder which got almost 45 mpg. A similar car today doesn't get too close to that number with all the emission controls. So hypothetically the MPG has been cut nearly in half due to all the emission control systems saving pollution, but you need twice as much fuel to go the same distance. My logic may be flawed, but it looks to me like a net zero. But then again we are talking about a little Honda and not the huge land yachts.
It's not just emissions controls. We now have many more safety features, creature comforts, less efficient HVAC, makes more power... and do it all on that sham that is ethanol blended fuel, which sucks a few points off your MPGs.
 

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I agree with you as well. From what I've read, and talking to techie friends, one of the reasons they're not adopting BEVs (other than a second, fun car) is the thought of having to wait an hour or so for a charge on a trip, versus five minutes getting gas. Or, perhaps, not being able to find a charging station or, if you do, that it's occupied for the next two hours. That would be my concern, say, on a trip to the wine country, or the Sierras.

It took a while for gas stations to be ubiquitous...

I'd like to see hydrogen as a competitor. It's not going to be the Hindenburg all over again. Is it as dangerous to pump hydrogen as it is to pump such a highly volatile and flammable liquid as gasoline? I don't know.
I remember years ago it was suggested that filling stations could replace universal battery packs, already fully charged. Of course that would take serious manufacturer cooperation.
Also, I'd rather have an accident, be it traffic accident or refueling mishap, with gasoline than highly compressed hydrogen.
 

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I remember years ago it was suggested that filling stations could replace universal battery packs, already fully charged. Of course that would take serious manufacturer cooperation.
Also, I'd rather have an accident, be it traffic accident or refueling mishap, with gasoline than highly compressed hydrogen.
Yep, let's take, say, a Ford Pinto and... you know where I'm going with this... 😸
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Turbo Diesel would be alternative power train. They have little turbo diesel everywhere in Europe... might even be a TD Crosstrek out there somewhere at this moment.


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Diesel was being promoted when I lived there. Not the cleanest of the fossil fuels...
 

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I think the danger with hydrogen is it has to be super pressurized so can be very dangerous in crashes.

Electric has already made huge improvements on charge times and as others have stated they could have fully charged batteries that you swap out at gas stations, could be faster than filling gas even.

Either way we are pretty far off fell short refill times for electric, it will get there though.

Or even more forward thinking with electricity lines running everywhere who’s to say there won’t be roads that can charge your car as you drive on them think of a electric trolly car in the city. Have a charging lane every couple hundred miles on the expressways. Who knows.
 

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I think the danger with hydrogen is it has to be super pressurized so can be very dangerous in crashes.

Electric has already made huge improvements on charge times and as others have stated they could have fully charged batteries that you swap out at gas stations, could be faster than filling gas even.

Either way we are pretty far off fell short refill times for electric, it will get there though.

Or even more forward thinking with electricity lines running everywhere who’s to say there won’t be roads that can charge your car as you drive on them think of a electric trolly car in the city. Have a charging lane every couple hundred miles on the expressways. Who knows.
Love it! Instead of filling up, you swap out the battery!

Charging while driving is much more of a challenge, engineering, politics, etc.
 

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Love it! Instead of filling up, you swap out the battery!

Charging while driving is much more of a challenge, engineering, politics, etc.
Sounds good in theory. But not sure how practical this could be with all the different car manufacturers. The Kona battery weighs 1000 lbs, and has a sophisticated coolant thermal management system. Every car is different with their TMS. Each car needs a different shape battery, too, to fit their uni-frame. They are not just flat packs. And of course diff cars need diff sizes for their weights and spec'd ranges.

I think this concept would be more practical with large transport trucks and trains, where you could standardize and store such batteries. But will be interesting to see how this evolves over time.
 

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Sounds good in theory. But not sure how practical this could be with all the different car manufacturers. The Kona battery weighs 1000 lbs, and has a sophisticated coolant thermal management system. Every car is different with their TMS. Each car needs a different shape battery, too, to fit their uni-frame. They are not just flat packs. And of course diff cars need diff sizes for their weights and spec'd ranges.

I think this concept would be more practical with large transport trucks and trains, where you could standardize and store such batteries. But will be interesting to see how this evolves over time.
It's an interesting thought experiment. Today you don't need to worry about power for your ICE or Hybrid vehicle, you just fill up at the nearest gas station. What if car batteries were standardized and you could swap a battery, anywhere?

The development of supercapacitors/ultracapacitors is also interesting...
 

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It's an interesting thought experiment. Today you don't need to worry about power for your ICE or Hybrid vehicle, you just fill up at the nearest gas station. What if car batteries were standardized and you could swap a battery, anywhere?

The development of supercapacitors/ultracapacitors is also interesting...
Yes, that mat be possible. However, they are also now moving to higher voltage traction batteries (800V) that can be charged much, much faster on the road. That might be the best ultimate solution. Even now, with 300 - 400V batteries, fast chargers are pretty good and I don't mind a 1/2 hour stop today after a 3 hour drive period.
 

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Hi, in my opinion is there a solution for the batteriproblem, but then had all producers to agree to 1 standardbatteri. This standardbatteri have a defined size, lets take a Ioniq/Kona and say: 32kwh capacity. It have a standardconnector and all cooling/heatingsystems are integreted. The carproducer decide if his car shall be able to fit 1, 2 or 3 batteries. But at least, every car works with just 1 batteri. The batteriproducer owns the batteri and the customer just rent/lease it. The batteriproducer is fully responsible for charging and replacing when the batteri reach his defined "lifetime". The batteri sits at easy acessible places under the car that a robot can replace them.

There is a electric car producer in China who exactly do it on this way. The batteri is under the car, removable. in the area there and later in the rest of the country is the producer building charging/changingstastions. So you just drive in, the robot replace the batteri, you pay for charging and maybe som servicefees and continue after 5-10 minutes with a fully loaded batteri...
 
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