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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are there any downsides to using an E-load tire? I realize ride stiffness may be one. Weight possibly as well, but the tire I’m looking at weighs similarly to the KO2 that seems to be commonly used.

My reasons for considering it are durability, performance and the possibility of airing down substantially for off road use.

Toyo Celsius Cargo 205/75R16C

I realize that there are versions off this tire made for crossovers and that it doesn’t have a tread design geared toward off road use. I’m mostly curious about the disadvantages of using an E-load tire on a Crosstrek, but any other comments or advice are welcome as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
there's a video with a dyno test, you lose about 15hp because of the weight of the k02, so i'm guessing it would probably be the same.
Thanks. I hadn’t seen that video, but had seen a similar one posted somewhere here. I’m not too concerned about horsepower, but I am concerned about efficiency and realize that in this context they are related.

If I were to use this tire though, I would pair it with a wheel that would yield a weight close to that of the stock combination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks. I hadn’t seen that video, but had seen a similar one posted somewhere here. I’m not too concerned about horsepower, but I am concerned about efficiency and realize that in this context they are related.

If I were to use this tire though, I would pair it with a wheel that would yield a weight close to that of the stock combination.
I’ll add to this in that HP may also be a concern in off road performance for an AWD vehicle compared to a 4WD vehicle with solid axle(s) and low range gears. I don’t know enough about the Crosstrek’s AWD system to know if that’s a valid concern though. Hopefully it’s a moot point if the combined wheel/tire weight isn’t changing.
 

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curious about why? there are several trail tires these days that have tough sidewalls, with the addition of having offroad tread patterns and compounds. That cargo tire may be weather/snow rated, but I doubt it is offroad capable. The working inflated pressure and load rating would likely also make for a rough ride.
 

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Don't do it. The ride will be horrible, you will lose acceleration, braking, and cornering ability. When I had a Wrangler I knew some guys with E rated tires, they were the ones who had to come to almost a complete stop for speed bumps or potholes because the tires felt like rocks , even when underinflated. When using E rated tires you will overload the stock suspension since the ties will not absorb bumps like the car was designed to do. If your off roading is soo rough you really need E rated tires to survive, trade in the Subaru for a Bronco or Wrangler as they are much better for extreme and rough off roading. You can get off road tires with a proper load rating that are very durable and won't negatively effect everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
curious about why? there are several trail tires these days that have tough sidewalls, with the addition of having offroad tread patterns and compounds. That cargo tire may be weather/snow rated, but I doubt it is offroad capable. The working inflated pressure and load rating would likely also make for a rough ride.
curious about why? there are several trail tires these days that have tough sidewalls, with the addition of having offroad tread patterns and compounds. That cargo tire may be weather/snow rated, but I doubt it is offroad capable. The working inflated pressure and load rating would likely also make for a rough ride.
My main considerations in choosing a tire are performance on a wide range of surfaces in varying weather, durability and fuel economy (probably in that order) without great sacrifice in any one - a well balanced tire.

I’ve seen Crosstreks do impressively well (by my standards) off road on all seasons. Certainly more so on all terrains (often KO2s or similar), but they usually have other off road oriented mods as well. At most (aside from wheels/tires), I may consider skid plates somewhere down the road. It seems all seasons are capable of going most places an unmodified Crosstrek is capable of going and these Toyo Celsius seem to be better performing in various weather conditions.

That said, I’m definitely still considering all terrains (AT III, G015, KO2). Do you know of any that are more durable than others, what load range is necessary for that durability and possibly what makes them more durable. I’m definitely open to well informed suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't do it. The ride will be horrible, you will lose acceleration, braking, and cornering ability. When I had a Wrangler I knew some guys with E rated tires, they were the ones who had to come to almost a complete stop for speed bumps or potholes because the tires felt like rocks , even when underinflated. When using E rated tires you will overload the stock suspension since the ties will not absorb bumps like the car was designed to do. If your off roading is soo rough you really need E rated tires to survive, trade in the Subaru for a Bronco or Wrangler as they are much better for extreme and rough off roading. You can get off road tires with a proper load rating that are very durable and won't negatively effect everything else.
I just can’t rationalize this idea. Air pressure is the primary load bearing component of a tire by a very wide margin. How can two different tires of relatively slight different constructions distribute that load so dramatically different (when inflated to the same pressure)?
 

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I just can’t rationalize this idea. Air pressure is the primary load bearing component of a tire by a very wide margin. How can two different tires of relatively slight different constructions distribute that load so dramatically different (when inflated to the same pressure)?
The sidewalls are thicker and stiffer on an E load tire, they don't flex as much as a standard load range tire at any pressure. When you add this lack of flex to the additional unsprung weight it becomes very noticeable. The difference is construction isn't slight, it's significant. I tried 2 different E load tires on my Wrangler which was 600 -800 pounds heavier than a Crosstrek and it was the worst downgrade mod I've ever done. They felt worse off road as well IMO since they didn't flex over logs, rocks etc. and required more effort to maintain grip. Fortunately I was able to try the E load tires for free from a fellow Wrangler owner who suggested I try his before buying my own. That guy saved me a lot of money.
 

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The sidewalls are thicker and stiffer on an E load tire, they don't flex as much as a standard load range tire at any pressure. When you add this lack of flex to the additional unsprung weight it becomes very noticeable. The difference is construction isn't slight, it's significant. I tried 2 different E load tires on my Wrangler which was 600 -800 pounds heavier than a Crosstrek and it was the worst downgrade mod I've ever done. They felt worse off road as well IMO since they didn't flex over logs, rocks etc. and required more effort to maintain grip. Fortunately I was able to try the E load tires for free from a fellow Wrangler owner who suggested I try his before buying my own. That guy saved me a lot of money.
If you properly air down an E load tire, you will find on smaller/lighter vehicles that it actually IS better. The tire doesn't flex out as much aired down, so you don't lose grkund clearance, and yet it wraps nicely arojnd logs and rocks. And when aired down, if you like driving over wrenching, it's nice to know your tire sidewall will take some beating and slashing.
It's a compromise. I prefer to be set up to not have issues off road. So I compromise a little on road. Well worth the trade off.
I only have ever run E loads on my Wranglers. Fiftwen years and counting. No issues on road. Least off road capable was the Toyo ATIII IMO. Great on road comfort, great mud traction. 2 ply sidewalls, so the were spongy compared to my 3 ply sidewall ko2's. And that sidewall always left me wondering how long until I cut it down.
My wife's Crosstrek, she is not going to get in the rocks etc, so she has the Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail. Another awesome on road/soft road all weather tire, and perfect for her car.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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Tire weight will not just slow you down, eat into MPG but will also wear out axle and drive train components much faster. Jeep world see this all the time from people running big heavy tires.
My friend who ran E Load oversized tires had to replace rear brakes about every 20,000 miles after he installed them, he got over 50k on his original brakes with the stock tires. Don't let a Wrangler with oversized tires drive behind you on the highway, they have the worst braking I've ever experienced. Few people upgrade the brakes which should be done, especially on a Jeep which has weak brakes from the factory.
 

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I'm also of the no E-load rating persuasion when it comes to selecting an appropriate multi-terrain, all-weather tire for a Crosstrek. Unless you regularly hit rock-strewn, technical trails or often find yourself in thorns or arrowhead shale chips, you will be "over-tired" with E-load rated tires. As for airing down, with a relatively lightweight vehicle like the Crosstrek, you would need to drop to 10-12 psi in order to get the heavy, stiff carcass of an E-load tire to conform to/wrap around logs or big rocks. That's into the realm of needing beadlock wheels in order to prevent rolling the tires right off of the wheels.

For 5 years, I wheeled a 5600lb M-B G550 on 65-series, P-rated, Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015's year 'round here in the foothills and eastern approaches to the Rockies (Alberta). Easy, quiet, 70-80mph drive to the trailhead, then often down to a walking pace on the trail. When the terrain warranted airing down, I'd drop tire pressures from 33F/38R down to 18F/23R. Never a puncture or sidewall tear. You just pick your line carefully and go slow ("tread lightly"). Having a spotter definitely helps.

From a previous reply to a new forum member looking for Crosstrek tires ...

Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail, Nitto Nomad Grappler, Nokian Outpost APT, Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 and BFG Trail-Terrain T/A are tires intended specifically for crossover vehicles like the Crosstrek. All are available in the stock tire size (225/60R17) or you could go up in size to 225/65R17 which is roughly 1-inch larger in overall diameter. Here on this forum, the Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail tire appears to be the most popular choice.

Tires which are heavier than the OEM Yokohama Geolandar G91 tires will have detrimental effect on your Crosstrek's acceleration, braking, handling and suspension component life. In this context, a lighter wheel/tire combination is always preferable.

Some people who choose a smaller wheel and a tire with more sidewall height do so for a legitimate reason (e.g. airing down to increase comfort, grip and puncture resistance when traversing rough terrain). Other people just prefer the look of smaller diameter wheels with beefier tires. Those 15" and 16" wheels suitable for Crosstreks also usually have less positive offset which pushes the mounted wheel/tire further out towards the fender lip (more "poke").

When selecting tires, also take into consideration your local road conditions through all 12 months of the year. Tirerack's website is very helpful with their posted tire comparisons in each tire type category.

Also of note in these uncertain times, some of the popular tires are either in short supply or continuously on back-order. My own set of 5 Nokian tires had to be rounded-up from 3 different locations across Canada.

Happy tire shopping!
 
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