Subaru XV Crosstrek Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2015 XV Crosstrek with 78000 miles, and thinking that the plugs are overdue, I've built up enough courage to change them out today, with referencing all the helpful guides and videos posted on this site as well as on Youtube. All the plugs came out looking to be in decent condition with no oil, blackening etc.

1) OEM NGK iridium plugs were purchased online through a dealer parts store. Tried checking the Gap with the silver coin looking gap tool, but all of them seemed to be less than .044. More like .035 ish as I've seen on some posts, and left them as is, as I did not want to damage the tip.
2) The driver side most dreaded and difficult to get to plug and the one in front of it, I've tightened them as much as I could without over tightening it. Thought I felt the 'wall' and stopped. However, I may have not tightened them enough actually.. as I installed the passenger's side plugs.
3) Passenger side front I've realized I had to tighten them a bit more than the driver's side.
4) The last plug passenger side rear was tightened like the front but almost at or close to the 'wall', I felt/heard a very brief "squeak" so I stopped.

Engine idled fine after the replacement, but slight stutter like a slight hiccup happened a couple of times, which I disregarded it, as it idled fine after that. When I put the car in reverse stutters were more pronounced, but not to a degree where the engine was going to stall. I felt a slight stutter here and there as I drove the car around the block and took it up to 45 MPH, and more stutter when I come to a stop. No code thrown through 10 mins of driving, and I've heard unless the issue is significant, no codes will appear, so I've decided to return home.

I've seen a similar post, but he had much worse stutter and later discovered he had two plugs cracked. I wonder if that "squeak" noise was ceramic/porcelain cracking? If indeed it is cracked, would I be able to get it out as I was able to remove the other plugs?

Any and all guidance/advice would be tremendously appreciated.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Vancouver, BC, Canada CGK 2018 Ltd EyeSight
Joined
·
1,821 Posts
Yup, if you don't have the right equipment/wrenches, very easy to damage them, esp when you near the max torque.

I used to change plugs on all my past vehicles myself,.. but not on this one. Thankfully, they won't need changing very often. And my other car (Kona EV) doesn't have plugs,... haha. There really isn't much of anything to maintain on that one. Brakes will last forever, because of regen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Update: My suspicion was correct, as when I've worked up the nerve to get out to the garage to undue everything I've done, starting with that suspicious "squeak" noise plug... that squeak was the noise of the plug cracking... hairline crack down the middle of the plug (vertically) made enough fault to let the car hiccup now and then as I drove it around for 10 minutes..

Once I changed that plug with one of my old plugs, it idled and drove without any issues nor hiccups, as I drove around for about 20 minutes.

Lesson learned: When you tighten the spark plug, if you hear what sounds like a milli-second of rusty squeak.. that's your plug's ceramic body cracking. Keep in mind that I didn't reach the "wall" nor did I ever forcefully over torqued the plug.

Other than this little unfortunate but a fortunate mishap, make sure to buy a 3" wobble extender to make the job a whole lot easier.

I appreciate XVFORUM and various Youtubers for their guidance/how to's and helpful advice with my first Subaru.

Thank yoU!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Yup, if you don't have the right equipment/wrenches, very easy to damage them, esp when you near the max torque.

I used to change plugs on all my past vehicles myself,.. but not on this one. Thankfully, they won't need changing very often. And my other car (Kona EV) doesn't have plugs,... haha. There really isn't much of anything to maintain on that one. Brakes will last forever, because of regen.
I appreciate your empathy, as I I soooo much contemplated on taking the job to the dealership and pay apprx $300 to get it done, for what costed me $60 in plugs... but after doing the entire brake job myself (newbie; rotors turned and front, rear pads swapped) and with the help from various SME from XVFORUM and Youtube, I was able to work up enough courage to attempt the job myself.

Yes, I did run into a "squeak" issue and panicked! Lol! However, after a breather, I was able to trouble shoot it and bring peace to my universe once again.... as my wife is semi-happy that we can take our scheduled long distance travel in a couple of days... and I am at peace...
 

·
Super Moderator
2013 XV Crosstrek, Tangerine Orange
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
Thanks for the update, and I'm glad it got sorted! Changing the plugs in these things is definitely a pain in the butt.

BTW, I've deleted the duplicate posts about this in other threads, since the forum doesn't allow duplicate postings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the update, and I'm glad it got sorted! Changing the plugs in these things is definitely a pain in the butt.

BTW, I've deleted the duplicate posts about this in other threads, since the forum doesn't allow duplicate postings.
yes, I was posting questions as I was panicking at the time... Lol!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
I hope you used a 9/16" spark plug tool with a rubber liner. The rubber liner protects the porcelain (ceramic).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I hope you used a 9/16" spark plug tool with a rubber liner. The rubber liner protects the porcelain (ceramic).
I guess that the ceramic protection is a useful bonus. I always thought that the rubber insert was just to grip the plug to the socket so it would all retrieve or install together in a deep recess application. Is there a Check Engine code that will strongly suggest that the plugs need changed ? Seems that many are finding that the plugs are still in good shape after removing them when they'd assumed that they'd be worn out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I hope you used a 9/16" spark plug tool with a rubber liner. The rubber liner protects the porcelain (ceramic).
Unfortunately not, I’ve used a magnetic insert socket as that’s all the store had. Maybe the rubber insert one could’ve prevented the crack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Unfortunately not, I’ve used a magnetic insert socket as that’s all the store had. Maybe the rubber insert one could’ve prevented the crack.
The neoprene (?) foam rubber spark plug socket insert can probably be gotten (free?) from Snap-On, MAC, Cornwell or similar tool seller.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top