Subaru Crosstrek and XV Forums banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Prefers non-orange cars
'18 and '19 Crosstrek Limiteds
Joined
·
10,158 Posts
Yeah, this experience made me realize I need 6-point 1/2" sockets. Ordered a Tekton set.
I've always wondered why they even have the 12 points. They're marginally easier to get on but that's the risk you take for the convenience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
They aren't common, but there are 12pt nuts and bolts that would require 12pt sockets.

The primary reason is probably that it's easier to index the socket to fit on the fastener. Also, sometimes the ratchet 'click' point increments aren't always spaced right for turning fasteners in limited spaces. Rotating the socket position on the fastener could provide a slightly different range of motion for the ratchet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I tried an electric pump with a hose down the dipstick tube. No joy on the 2018, it leaves about a quart of oil behind. The hose doesn't go all the way to the bottom of the oil pan due to geometry. I do use the electric pump successfully on my other car with zero oil left behind. On the Subi I use the Fumoto. Also use a Fumoto on my motorcycle. A well made product that works perfectly so that oil draining is clean and easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
....n the Subi I use the Fumoto. Also use a Fumoto on my motorcycle. A well made product that works perfectly so that oil draining is clean and easy.
I work with engineers from good schools in our area, all very young, engaged and questioning everything. When I discussed the "Fumoto," they need flow per minute and also when luke warm vs cold [not biblical: LUKE]. I told these peeps, it'll drain in seconds. Drive up on Rino Ramps [TM] and so enjoy in twelve minutes drain to replacing the filtre.
 

·
Registered
2016 Crosstrek
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
To each his own. I don't like the valve hanging below the pan. Also you don't get that good a flush. I do extended drain intervals so I don't change often. To each his own
My feelings as well. Also, I had one on my '03, and the threads extend beyond the nut inside the pan, meaning there will be extra oil left in the pan.
 

·
Prefers non-orange cars
'18 and '19 Crosstrek Limiteds
Joined
·
10,158 Posts
My feelings as well. Also, I had one on my '03, and the threads extend beyond the nut inside the pan, meaning there will be extra oil left in the pan.
That's a good point, hadn't thought of that. And also exactly where the sludge will accumulate.

I've never used one but from the posts I've read it seemed like a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
If sludge accumulates, it will be there whether there is 1mm or 2mm of oil left behind after draining. I seriously doubt sludge has a gradient by depth that would matter. FWIW, my refill quantity after draining with the Fumoto is the same as the refill with the regular drain plug.

Were I seriously worried about it, I would flush with a few quarts of fresh oil and drain a second time before doing the final refill. Or, I'd do a refill, run the engine, then drain it all, then refill and install a new filter. Or jack the car up on an angle so the drain plug is lower than the rest of the pan.

What I do, though, is frequent oil changes so that there isn't a whole lot of crap in the oil to worry about leaving a bit behind due to imperfect draining.
 

·
Registered
2020 Crosstrek Premium
Joined
·
638 Posts
To each his own. I don't like the valve hanging below the pan. Also you don't get that good a flush. I do extended drain intervals so I don't change often. To each his own
It doesn't really hang low on this car FYI. Looking at mine when I first installed it, a rock would have to significantly dent the headers before hitting the valve. And that's assuming it got past my skid plate. The snip below is stolen from the LPAventure skid plate install pdf.

Gteaser modified his drain valve to fit more flush on his EJ: Subaru Legacy Forums - View Single Post - 5th Gen LGT - Performance Mods
You could do something similar if your worried.

I gotta say, the convenience factor is significant. Cars should come with a valve like this.

303395
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
There must be a reason why they don't
cost plain & simple

probably the same reason it’s a 14mm plug now instead of a 17mm

some corporate bean counter figured out if they save .0X cents per engine plug @ X amount of engines per year = XX,XXX per year saved.

GM put a RPO code sticker in every truck glove box for 50ish years mid year 2018 they stopped (when they ran out of sticker stock) so now you (or the tech @ the stealership) has to scan the barcode on the door jam sticker to pull the codes up. saves GM .25 cents per truck between the sticker, ink & labor of the assembly line worker. somebody did the math it ended up being in the hundreds of thousands per year. never mind it now takes the tech 3x longer to pull the RPO so he can tell the parts guy which part he needs...
 

·
Registered
2020 Crosstrek Premium
Joined
·
638 Posts
cost plain & simple

probably the same reason it’s a 14mm plug now instead of a 17mm

some corporate bean counter figured out if they save .0X cents per engine plug @ X amount of engines per year = XX,XXX per year saved.

GM put a RPO code sticker in every truck glove box for 50ish years mid year 2018 they stopped (when they ran out of sticker stock) so now you (or the tech @ the stealership) has to scan the barcode on the door jam sticker to pull the codes up. saves GM .25 cents per truck between the sticker, ink & labor of the assembly line worker. somebody did the math it ended up being in the hundreds of thousands per year. never mind it now takes the tech 3x longer to pull the RPO so he can tell the parts guy which part he needs...
I would also add that the amount of drivers who change their own oil is probably not statistically significant enough to make cars easy to work on. I'm glad that my car is easy to change the oil on, but my friend has a '15 outback with the same filter location as us and she won't even consider changing her own.
 

·
Prefers non-orange cars
'18 and '19 Crosstrek Limiteds
Joined
·
10,158 Posts
I would also add that the amount of drivers who change their own oil is probably not statistically significant enough to make cars easy to work on. I'm glad that my car is easy to change the oil on, but my friend has a '15 outback with the same filter location as us and she won't even consider changing her own.
Long ago when I was first dating OAK she was having problems with the battery in her car at the time. I went to the local parts store (don't recall the name, now it's O'Reilly) and picked up a new battery and installed it. A trivial job for those of us who have rebuilt cars from the chassis up. The rest is history, LOL!

It's the same in my industry - a computer (i.e. a PC, Mac, iPhone or Android, etc.) is a black box and only the magicians know how to fix it.
 

·
Registered
2021 Subaru Crosstrek Limited
Joined
·
241 Posts
Long ago when I was first dating OAK she was having problems with the battery in her car at the time. I went to the local parts store (don't recall the name, now it's O'Reilly) and picked up a new battery and installed it. A trivial job for those of us who have rebuilt cars from the chassis up. The rest is history, LOL!

It's the same in my industry - a computer (i.e. a PC, Mac, iPhone or Android, etc.) is a black box and only the magicians know how to fix it.
O'reillly has bought out various chains....Hi/Lo, CSK, and four or five others.
 

·
Prefers non-orange cars
'18 and '19 Crosstrek Limiteds
Joined
·
10,158 Posts
Yeah, it was a was a local one with a few locations. Still can't remember what it was called. O'Reilly's seems OK but for a few things Autozone has been better, just means I have to drive farther, in L.A. traffic...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
...They have some sort of device that heats a fastener without heating the surrounding area, and they had to use that to break it loose...
For the record, and to help others-
When you heat a fastener, it expands and gets larger in all directions. If it's inside a nut or or other object, the more you heat it, the tighter it gets.

When you heat the nut or the area surrounding the fastener, the HOLE actually gets larger (counter-intuitive, right?) thus loosening the grip on the fastener. I've seen mechanics (briefly) heat a casting with a welding torch to help loosen a fastener, but I wouldn't recommend an open flame anywhere near an engine compartment. A high power heat gun would be a better option. The trick is to heat the surrounding area quickly, before significant heat can transfer to the fastener.

Other than the occasional stuck fastener, this technique is often used when installing bearings on a shaft. Heat the bearing ID to expand the hole, slide it on the shaft and let it cool for a tight grip. (Or - you could freeze the shaft.)
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top