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I think its not designed to run for 15 seconds at that rpm.
Pretty sure all the early CVTs held a constant RPM at max throttle since its most efficient, and consumer backlash was huge. People hated the feeling/noise, and so I think the marketing department won and said "hey, engineers, our job is to sell cars and people don't like how it feels so make it feel... normal", and I'm sure many engineers facepalmed but the consumer is always right.

I mean even a small child if you ask them "make race car sounds!" they'll go vroom, vroooom, vrooooooom through the gears, they don't just screech "WWEEEEE" making a redline noise for 16 seconds. :D

Even though I know better, the constant RPM acceleration almost sounds broken in the sound example of different transmissions:
 

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It does go smoothly up to 6K rpm. But then what? It would need to stay at 6000. I doubt the engine would hold up at 6000 rpm for 15 seconds or so.
I actually don't see any reason why a modern engine couldn't stay at 6k rpm for several minutes at a stretch. That would be increased wear, sure, but the ecu should be able to use its heuristics and sensors to monitor and take appropriate action to avoid damage. And I'm not even convinced that the increased wear would be statistically significant if it wasn't a common occurrence. Especially if you change the oil often enough.

My '01 Echo used to redline constantly for minutes at a time on steep hills on the interstates. The 4at just wasn't geared for that. Never had a problem.
My '02 Celica had to sometimes too, though it was a 5mt (later a 6mt), and also never an engine issue. I did explode 3rd gear in the 5mt and swapped in a 6mt at ~180k miles. It's now over 225k miles and still no issues.
Those are of course completely different engines by a different manufacturer.

EDIT:
Actually, now that I think about it, if the torque curve is shaped right and you program the "shifts" right, you should be able to simulate "shifts" for the drivers that like them without significantly effecting performance. And to be clear: I really like my CVT. Not such a fan of the artificial shift points, but they're fine.
 

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I actually don't see any reason why a modern engine couldn't stay at 6k rpm for several minutes at a stretch. That would be increased wear, sure, but the ecu should be able to use its heuristics and sensors to monitor and take appropriate action to avoid damage. And I'm not even convinced that the increased wear would be statistically significant if it wasn't a common occurrence. Especially if you change the oil often enough.

My '01 Echo used to redline constantly for minutes at a time on steep hills on the interstates. The 4at just wasn't geared for that. Never had a problem.
My '02 Celica had to sometimes too, though it was a 5mt (later a 6mt), and also never an engine issue. I did explode 3rd gear in the 5mt and swapped in a 6mt at ~180k miles. It's now over 225k miles and still no issues.
Those are of course completely different engines by a different manufacturer.

EDIT:
Actually, now that I think about it, if the torque curve is shaped right and you program the "shifts" right, you should be able to simulate "shifts" for the drivers that like them without significantly effecting performance. And to be clear: I really like my CVT. Not such a fan of the artificial shift points, but they're fine.
I hope we don't start seeing electric cars with piped noise and artificial shift points to appease the petrol heads, LOL. Or at least that there's an option to turn it off in the vehicle settings... 😸
 

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It was annoying enough to have noise piped into my '16 GTI - fortunately I could disable it and make a custom profile to remember it. It was a 6MT, though, so definitely no artificial shift points there....
 

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I hope we don't start seeing electric cars with piped noise and artificial shift points to appease the petrol heads, LOL. Or at least that there's an option to turn it off in the vehicle settings... 😸
Never seen shift points suggested, but that issue was actually brought up on Tesla's strategy on popularizing electrics back in the day. One of the reasons he made his vehicles massively overpowered by contemporary standards was to combat the perception of electrics not just being slow but feeling extra slow.

Because the electric motors are so quiet, and due to energy capacity reasons need to pay extra consideration to aerodynamics and are thus have little wind noise, combined with a very smooth power delivery would mean that an electric going 0-60 in 10 seconds would feel far more sluggish than it really is, and perception is people's realities.

So Tesla could have gone with very skinny low-rolling resistance tires and used a single smaller lighter more efficient motor and got away with less batteries for example, but were clever and decided to go the opposite extreme putting on Michelin high performance tires and powering it with breakneck sub 3-second 60mph speeds so the g-forces alone would be more than enough to make them exciting (along with making them look really sporty).

So that way they didn't suffer the fate of say the Mitsubishi i-MiEV that was pretty much universally crapped on for being lethargic and soulless.

Regarding fake sounds for electric vehicles? Its coming to ALL of them.

By law all electrics going forward will have to make some kind of fake electric motor noise at lower speeds to combat the problem of unaware pedestrians being run over, and Porsche released their artificial electric motor noise they plan to leave on recently which was very Tron-like and I dig it:
 

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Even Scotty likes it, but of course it's Toyota:
 

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Even Scotty likes it, but of course it's Toyota:
Except that a year ago he advised to avoid the same transmission and definitely did not like it:

I wonder why he suddenly reversed himself, unless he just didn't realize its the same one his customers were giving complaints about?
 

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What rpm could it actually hold other than 6000 rpm as you accelerated up to say 80 mph?
My argument is that I don't think it'd be a problem, and in the video linked you can see the CVT example is holding 6,200rpm by design. I'm sure they would just build the components, rings, cooler, etc so that it could handle it fine, just like say a Yamaha R6 has no problem hitting 17K rpm.

I think the only reason they don't is purely a consumer satisfaction thing.
 

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Even Scotty likes it, but of course it's Toyota:
LOL, and the way this thread is heading, it should be moved to the Non-Subaru Car Talk forum... 😸
 

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It is what it is as they say.
We do get a say, that's why our CVTs are "geared"! Feedback just like yours. :)

So whether its concerns about holding redline breaking the engine, bad NVH, feeling slower, etc. en masse the public have voted and so its likely that most CVTs will remain faux geared. It probably makes only a very small impact in performance, and makes a lot of people happier with the way it drives which is all that matters.

And manufacturers would still prefer them with faux gears over traditional automatics, and especially expensive DCTs, with real gears for lower power applications as they are lighter and much cheaper to manufacture while having the same efficiency as high-geared automatics.
 

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Well there is a solution. I personally would prefer a totally shiftless option. If you want a shift use the paddles. A good compromise would just allow a max rpm like maybe 5700 rpm and let it continuously raise the gear ratio (no shifting) from that point and thar rpm... That would probably make the vehicle a bit quicker as you lose time and HP when it shifts down to like 4900 rpm.

No big deal for the XV but for my XT it would be great.
 

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Well there is a solution. I personally would prefer a totally shiftless option. If you want a shift use the paddles. A good compromise would just allow a max rpm like maybe 5700 rpm and let it continuously raise the gear ratio (no shifting) from that point and thar rpm... That would probably make the vehicle a bit quicker as you lose time and HP when it shifts down to like 4900 rpm.

No big deal for the XV but for my XT it would be great.
Yep, and since everything is electronic these days it wouldn't be hard to have a shift mode versus continuous mode switch somewhere, like some cars have a sport mode switch.
 

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A good compromise would just allow a max rpm like maybe 5700 rpm and let it continuously raise the gear ratio (no shifting) from that point and thar rpm...
I watch the industry as a hobby and don't think I've ever seen a CVT that lets you switch, so there must be some reason as I'm sure the engineers thought about that.

I know on the Vette people thought it stupid that on even a manual transmission 2nd and 3rd gear are locked out below a certain throttle, forcing you to shift from 1st to 4th gear. Car guys are familiar with volumetric efficiency being best at high load low RPM, but the EPA and emissions guys likely only allow that operation of the vehicle for the test if its forced so GM had to lock out gears rather than just say "drive it for economy for the test". Government sucks and so we all pay the price, so maybe its an emissions/fuel economy ratings thing?

Or perhaps they were just worried about the shared vehicle problem, where say you set a button that toggles between the shift modes and remembers its setting, but Billy takes it out for a quick grocery run and switches to his preference, brings it back, and now mom and dad think the car is broken because its "stuck in gear" when really they just have to push a button. Hardly anybody reads their car's user manual anymore. Just spitballin.
 

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Yep, and since everything is electronic these days it wouldn't be hard to have a shift mode versus continuous mode switch somewhere, like some cars have a sport mode switch.
Certainly agree with ya!

Or perhaps they were just worried about the shared vehicle problem, where say you set a button that toggles between the shift modes and remembers its setting, but Billy takes it out for a quick grocery run and switches to his preference, brings it back, and now mom and dad think the car is broken because its "stuck in gear" when really they just have to push a button. Hardly anybody reads their car's user manual anymore. Just spitballin.
Just let it default like "S/S#" defaults to "I". Just isn't a priority to do it.
 

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Just showing what oil and coolant temps looklike on a 75 degree day with ac on a leisurely drive. Coolant left oil right. My XT oil temp runs much higher.
 
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