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How has/is everyone doing with the "break in period" with your new vehicles when you got it? I'm going by what the manual says and doing my best to keep it below 4k rpm's until I hit at least 1k miles. I'm babying the heck out of my car lol and I'm curious on what your guy's thoughts are on this. I'm sure it can make a difference, but every car can be made ever so slightly different and every car will go to whatever mileage it can before it dies. Wether this can make a difference and add an extra 5-10k miles onto the life of the motor or not, I think it can help so I'm doing it. I'm also trying to keep the rpm's fluctuating regularly and trying not to use cruise control a whole lot.
 

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How has/is everyone doing with the "break in period" with your new vehicles when you got it? I'm going by what the manual says and doing my best to keep it below 4k rpm's until I hit at least 1k miles. I'm babying the heck out of my car lol and I'm curious on what your guy's thoughts are on this. I'm sure it can make a difference, but every car can be made ever so slightly different and every car will go to whatever mileage it can before it dies. Wether this can make a difference and add an extra 5-10k miles onto the life of the motor or not, I think it can help so I'm doing it. I'm also trying to keep the rpm's fluctuating regularly and trying not to use cruise control a whole lot.
We've had a lot of threads on this - there's one camp that follows the manual and another that thinks it's not necessary and you should drive it like you stole it from day one.
 
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We've had a lot of threads on this - there's one camp that follows the manual and another that thinks it's not necessary and you should drive it like you stole it from day one.
I know right. It is a very interesting topic and it is hard to prove wether it really works or not considering not all vehicles are made the same. I guess you cant go wrong either way as long as you're not red lining it every time.
 

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I know right. It is a very interesting topic and it is hard to prove wether it really works or not considering not all vehicles are made the same. I guess you cant go wrong either way as long as you're not red lining it every time.
Yep, if you don't break it in and the engine blows up at 150K, could it have gone to 300K? Who knows? I'm in the follow the manual camp...
 

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New engines make metal. The oil will have lots of little bits of shiny metal in it as proof. The metal is from parts which fit together imperfectly, and thus with a little bit of use (breaking in), the offending extra is removed.

My theory is that the more gently a new motor is broken in, the more perfectly the parts wear-in to each other. High power and high rpm will impart more energy to these imperfections and tend to tear them off more vigorously, thus wearing more than necessary to get the parts perfectly worn-in together.

Another part of breaking in a motor is getting the piston rings to seal and seat properly in the cylinders and pistons. High pressures help, and that happens at high throttle settings but lower rpms.

So, my theory is that a motor is best broken in with lower rpms but don't be afraid to step on the gas as needed, as long as you aren't lugging the engine. Avoid rpms above about half of max to the extent safety allows it. Pushing it a bit to merge on the highway is fine as long as it is rare during break-in. There is rarely a need to push the engine beyond 4000 rpms in normal driving anyway. Basically, be kind and gentle to the greatest extent possible consistent with safety.

I change the oil and filter between 500-1000 miles, and then again in another 1000 miles. This is to keep the tiny bits of metal from recirculating into the engine and causing more wear.

The drive it like you stole it break-in method is aimed solely at proper piston ring seating, and ignores all the wear aspects in the rest of the engine. It also ignores true longevity for the typical driver, in favor of race condition performance. In this day and age of automobile engines, piston ring seating does not seem to ever be an issue. Materials and tolerances are so good it just isn't a problem.
 

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Agreed, except that there's no recommendation to change the oil before 6mo/6K
 
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Agreed, except that there's no recommendation to change the oil before 6mo/6K
That's true. Then again, if your worried about too many miles before that first oil change just keep it below the 6,000 mile mark. No shaming in taking it in without 6,000 miles at the end of the first 6 months.

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That's true. Then again, if your worried about too many miles before that first oil change just keep it below the 6,000 mile mark. No shaming in taking it in without 6,000 miles at the end of the first 6 months.

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They told me 3k. I did my first change at 500, and I am about to do another at 1500, then 3k, then every 3k after that. I am an "engine oil is the blood of your engine" kind of guy. And I agree with Utahraptor entirely. Take it easy, but don't be shy. Basically, drive "normally". I think I've stepped on it three times total, and of course, had to see what sport mode was all about. Aside from that, I just want to keep the metal shavings to a minimum. My first Blackstone engine oil test will be at 3k, and with every oil change after that. This is my first new car, so it will be interesting to monitor an engine from the beginning. It does bother me a bit that the CVT is a closed tranny... meaning I can't check the fluid, but even more that my model displays ZERO information as far as temps and pressures go. That is really, really odd. So I'll be mounting a monitor of some sort. For now I use the BlueDriver, but I'd like to have a static monitor other than my phone. Sorry, getting off topic. But like I said, I did my own first two break in changes and will provide "proof" with the receipts. That should be enough, I hope. I am not paying someone else to change my oil, ever. As for the CVT, every 30k. I don't care what a manual says. The more often you change fluids, the better. Tranny fluid does not last 120k, at MOST 60k first time then 30k every time after. But 30k can definitely aide in that push to 200k... or not? Who knows really. Like AstroKats said, you can do it all by the manual and still have an issue. I'd rather be on the side that at least tries to prevent it. Fluid is not "expensive", and it's the cheapest preventative measure you have. So every 30k for me is an overhaul on fluids.
 

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They told me 3k. I did my first change at 500, and I am about to do another at 1500, then 3k, then every 3k after that. I am an "engine oil is the blood of your engine" kind of guy. And I agree with Utahraptor entirely. Take it easy, but don't be shy. Basically, drive "normally". I think I've stepped on it three times total, and of course, had to see what sport mode was all about. Aside from that, I just want to keep the metal shavings to a minimum. My first Blackstone engine oil test will be at 3k, and with every oil change after that. This is my first new car, so it will be interesting to monitor an engine from the beginning. It does bother me a bit that the CVT is a closed tranny... meaning I can't check the fluid, but even more that my model displays ZERO information as far as temps and pressures go. That is really, really odd. So I'll be mounting a monitor of some sort. For now I use the BlueDriver, but I'd like to have a static monitor other than my phone. Sorry, getting off topic. But like I said, I did my own first two break in changes and will provide "proof" with the receipts. That should be enough, I hope. I am not paying someone else to change my oil, ever. As for the CVT, every 30k. I don't care what a manual says. The more often you change fluids, the better. Tranny fluid does not last 120k, at MOST 60k first time then 30k every time after. But 30k can definitely aide in that push to 200k... or not? Who knows really. Like AstroKats said, you can do it all by the manual and still have an issue. I'd rather be on the side that at least tries to prevent it. Fluid is not "expensive", and it's the cheapest preventative measure you have. So every 30k for me is an overhaul on fluids.
Who are "they"?

Our Warranty and Maintenance manual says the first should be at 6mo/6K and then every 6mo/6K. What does yours say?

Changing the oil more frequently shouldn't hurt anything (except your wallet) although some have speculated that the factory oil is formulated differently for the break-in period (back on topic) and that draining it too early could be detrimental. Metal flakes that are circulating would be caught by the filter. I don't know who's right, I just trust the Subaru design engineers and what it says in the manual more...
 

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Who are "they"?

Our Warranty and Maintenance manual says the first should be at 6mo/6K and then every 6mo/6K. What does yours say?

Changing the oil more frequently shouldn't hurt anything (except your wallet) although some have speculated that the factory oil is formulated differently for the break-in period (back on topic) and that draining it too early could be detrimental. Metal flakes that are circulating would be caught by the filter. I don't know who's right, I just trust the Subaru design engineers and what it says in the manual more...
The dealer.

The factory oil would not be any different. If they used anything different, it would be higher viscosity. Like 5w-30. And it's VERY unlikely. More likely are the additives and detergents, like moly. It has a molecular structure similar to lithium grease. They use essentially the same stuff in Difs, which is why the first change may seem milky or like it has moisture in it. But I used Amsoil 0w-20, so it's all good. It would be hard to believe the same engineers who spec the tolerances to specific levels would use thicker oil in the beginning, because that just means more metal on metal. I used to frequent the FORDF-150 forums, and the 5.4l was notorious for having top end issues. Just an overall nightmare. So many know it alls said "I use 5w-40, I use 5w-30", etc etc... and even fleet "mechanics" would come on saying they used 15w-40, but none of them reported their engines lasting longer or could prove anything they said. When it comes to the engine oil, trust the label on the fill cap that was specified by the engineers for more reasons than are in any manual. Definitely agree with you. I even saw a thread here that mentioned going to 5w-30 when they have a 0w-20 engine. Just don't do it! Watch some oil flow videos, watch some ProjectFarm, watch some videos that actually show thicker oil through pumps meant for lower viscosity, and you will see that doing so will without a doubt ruin something.

I have heard of Honda doing this "special formula" and refusing to release their definition of special. They simply make their own blend. It probably saves them money, and gives them a hand in the oil game. If anything, it's heavy on additives like moly. I have searched for this info on Subaru and found nothing. The owner of Blackstone basically said "meh", and what you said about the filter. So I am the paranoid one who wants to one up and change the oil more often, but it definitely won't hurt at all. All these articles about "it's a myth" are missing the major point... while it might last, the viscosity decreases on a molecular level and that causes wear. If you can afford to change it more often, do it. For me, it's a hobby ;)

Same with me using Amsoil products. It's over the top, but proven and costly. Also personal preference. I also use a magnetic drain plug to help catch those particles, and see it every oil change (especially on my old ford - lol).
 

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I get it. I wasn't referring to a different viscosity, just a different formulation (i.e. additives as you mention) that will be gone if you replace the oil during the break-in period, especially at 500 miles.

As for 5W-30, if I understand some of the complex oil threads here, that's the recommended oil in other markets for the exact same car and engine. The thinking being that the lower viscosity oil here is due to fuel efficiency requirements.

Anyway, your car, your money. I'll still follow the instructions in the manual... 😸
 
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I get it. I wasn't referring to a different viscosity, just a different formulation (i.e. additives as you mention) that will be gone if you replace the oil during the break-in period, especially at 500 miles.

As for 5W-30, if I understand some of the complex oil threads here, that's the recommended oil in other markets for the exact same car and engine. The thinking being that the lower viscosity oil here is due to fuel efficiency requirements.

Anyway, your car, your money. I'll still follow the instructions in the manual... 😸
Yes, same with some FORD discussions too, where it was 5w-20 over here and 5w-30 over there. Good point that I overlooked. I did try it before I rebuilt my 5.4L, and it was sluggish with a decrease in MPG. It was in the sub 1% range, but I noticed it. Since I am in Montana, and cold starts are something that exist even in summer, I'll stick with 0w. Just that much more help getting cold flow going. I think any good oil like Pennzoil Ultra Platinum or Amsoil have very good amounts of additives as well, and if you are skeptical you can add some Lucas additives. I don't use them for duration because they also change the viscosity but as far as detergents go for a flush before a change - or even seafoam, they are great. A little bit of additives go a LONG way. My first couple Blackstone tests showed massive amounts of detergents on previous vehicles. Then I scaled back from there. I see no reason to add that stuff unless it's to clean before a change. Anyways, take care, and I agree... when in doubt, follow the manual. When in doubt again, contact the dealer especially if it's under warranty, and I hope it is ;)
 

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.......I did my first change at 500, and I am about to do another at 1500, then 3k, then every 3k after that.........
Like changing my oil/filter early also. Don't drive that much anyway and did it myself. Other OC's are well under 3k. As to the OP: do the best you can to stick with what the manual says regarding the break-in and you will be fine.
 

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Like changing my oil/filter early also. Don't drive that much anyway and did it myself. Other OC's are well under 3k. As to the OP: do the best you can to stick with what the manual says regarding the break-in and you will be fine.
The first thing I do with a new car is evaluate it... verifying all its fluids, setting tire pressures, tightening clamps, testing braking and controls, with even engine sounds focused on. It's new, it's my responsibility and I don't want any surprises. Once that's done, which doesn't take long, I drive it... without restriction. On performance models I broke it in hard... lots of WOT then engine decels, braking designed to seat the pads, etc. No mercy, no care.

In earlier years, changing oil after a short time of owning it made sense, as often the drained oil had a lot of metal particles in it. I made a strong magnet on a long wire that I dragged the drain pan with and the results were often alarming. But about 10 or 11 years ago my new Subarus stopped evidencing metal in their OEM oil. I never stopped checking it but never found any metals again.

Similarly, I once also changed the OEM oil very early because I didn't trust it. But as BITOG's data grew it was apparent the OEM oil was actually a different and special concoction unavailable in "normal" recommended oils, actually meant to protect and condition the engine during the factory recommended OCI. So I learned to leave it alone and went 3K/6 mo. before changing the oil.

Either way, I've never had an engine problem with any of my many Subarus in thirty years of owning them. Not a one used oil inappropriately. Some were significantly modified and tuned. Most have been "made mine." None have been babied for any amount of time.

YMMV :)
 

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Manuifacturign process for engines in 202
The first thing I do with a new car is evaluate it... verifying all its fluids, setting tire pressures, tightening clamps, testing braking and controls, with even engine sounds focused on. It's new, it's my responsibility and I don't want any surprises. Once that's done, which doesn't take long, I drive it... without restriction. On performance models I broke it in hard... lots of WOT then engine decels, braking designed to seat the pads, etc. No mercy, no care.

In earlier years, changing oil after a short time of owning it made sense, as often the drained oil had a lot of metal particles in it. I made a strong magnet on a long wire that I dragged the drain pan with and the results were often alarming. But about 10 or 11 years ago my new Subarus stopped evidencing metal in their OEM oil. I never stopped checking it but never found any metals again.

Similarly, I once also changed the OEM oil very early because I didn't trust it. But as BITOG's data grew it was apparent the OEM oil was actually a different and special concoction unavailable in "normal" recommended oils, actually meant to protect and condition the engine during the factory recommended OCI. So I learned to leave it alone and went 3K/6 mo. before changing the oil.

Either way, I've never had an engine problem with any of my many Subarus in thirty years of owning them. Not a one used oil inappropriately. Some were significantly modified and tuned. Most have been "made mine." None have been babied for any amount of time.

YMMV :)
[/QUOTE
Do you have any real evidence that oil put in at the factory is a "special" oil? Everything I read recently indicates that car manufactures stopped that several years You mentioned that you can't find metal partials anymore in a new engine. That's why they don't use break-in oil anymore - much better manufacturing processes.
 
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Similarly, I once also changed the OEM oil very early because I didn't trust it. But as BITOG's data grew it was apparent the OEM oil was actually a different and special concoction unavailable in "normal" recommended oils, actually meant to protect and condition the engine during the factory recommended OCI. So I learned to leave it alone and went 3K/6 mo. before changing the oil.
Thanks! I guess this confirms the theory that the break-in oil is special and not only is it not necessary to change it before the recommended interval, you shouldn't... 😸
 
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Ok so this is Subi number three with a couple of other cars in there as well. I have maybe 3k on a 21 Crosstrek Limited. I changed the oil at 1.5 k and I was surprised it did not have much in the way of metal in the pan. Not scientific, I just poured of the oil till there was a 1/2" of oil and hit with a flash light. Almost nothing. An Audi A4, Subaru outback, 2 Toyota Prii all had noticeable metal shavings. You would think the filter would take out any shavings. 3 out of 4 of those cars went over 200k before I traded them in. I'm of the belief that the oil may last for a long time but it is probably very difficult to remove all the foreign matter initially. Change once or twice early then settle into factory specs. I would be shocked if they put a special oil in at the factory. They probably put out a bid for 300,000 gallons of SJ 5-20w oil and they get what they get. If they could figure how to ship them dry that would be huge savings in freight, but they have to drive them off and on the ships. I did notice the Subaru oil was much darker coming out of the car than the Toyota. Probably how Subaru handles the Exhaust Gas Recirculation.
 

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Manuifacturign process for engines in 202


Do you have any real evidence that oil put in at the factory is a "special" oil? Everything I read recently indicates that car manufactures stopped that several years You mentioned that you can't find metal partials anymore in a new engine. That's why they don't use break-in oil anymore - much better manufacturing processes.
I guess he could post his oil report...
 

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If they could figure how to ship them dry that would be huge savings in freight, but they have to drive them off and on the ships.
(Edited to correct values)

The crosstrek takes 4.6 quarts of oil at 2 lbs/quart = 9.2 pounds of motor oil per 3200 pound Crosstrek. It is a 0.2% savings in weight, thought not of volume. I'm not sure how much savings that will get over having someone at port or the dealer add oil to the engine.
 
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