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Hi,
I've been thinking about modifying my air intake system on my 2016 crosstrek. I have steered away from the cold air intake and towards an after market air filter. I was curious if these experience the same kind of problems with hydrolocking the engine? Is there a air bypass valve in the stock intake system?
 

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2020 Crosstrek Premium; 2010 LGT stage 2+
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If you're talking about a drop in panel air filter, I wouldn't worry about hydrolock any more than stock... Or performance gains... or better sound. But you might gain some placebo effects.

I not not know of an air bypass valve in the stock intake, but it's pretty high up so if you manage to hydrolock it, I'm guessing your car is floating away.

If you're talking about bolting a cone filter onto your intake, I'm not sure how you'd achieve that since the MAF is mounted on the oem air box.

Subaru stock intakes are cold air intakes. They're well designed and perform well even on turbo engines. On the WRX and LGT, it is not needed to upgrade the intake until you up size your turbo, and not necessarily even then.
 

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FWIW I switched my engine air filters out with an AEM dry flow air filter, for two reasons...well, one, really. It's a lifetime purchase. I don't need to buy new air filters every 15-30k, I just pop out the filter, stick it in a bucket of a Simple Green mixture to clean it for 20-30 minutes, wash it off, let it try out, and then reinstall. A LOT of crud comes off of it. Simple Green gets all the accumulated road tar, bugs, and other gunk out really well.

Is it cost-effective? If you go by the factory engine air filter replacement interval, it won't be cost effective until after 120k miles...$16/OEM filter, it takes a bit to add up to the cost of the AEM aftermarket filter. But..being able to yank it out and clean it whenever, and stick it back in a day later after it's dried out, does have some advantages especially if you live in a dusty climate and need to do some more air filter maintenance than someone in a dry, non-dusty climate would need to do.

I didn't notice any performance gains. MAYBE a slight uptick in happy fun engine noise, but that's probably more mental than an actual physical occurrence.

I wouldn't feel bad if I left the factory one in place and just replaced them every 20k (10k earlier than the factory recommended interval, but I live in a rural area, lots of dusty farm roads). They're not expensive and they're easy to swap out at home. It's really not any more restrictive than most of the good aftermarket filters, and it does a good job of filtering out the air as well IMO.
 

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Evil: If you do a used oil a used oil analysis you will see the error of your ways. Saving 60$ over the lifetime of the car FTL
 

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A quick google of AEM dryflow air filter reviews, comparing them to OEM and K&N oiled filters would correct your assumption, adc.
 

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2019 Outback 3.6R ..... 98 Forester S - Atl, GA
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With a stock motor there is nothing to be gained by an aftermarket filter other than possible very long term cost savings. Keep in mind K&N and like allow in more dirt in. Compare the two behind a bright light and then tell me what you think.
Take that money saved and spend it on tires and brakes.
 

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Precisely, thank you for making my point for me...

 
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