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Hello every one. I was brought a 2020 crosstrek and I have already drive for 6000 miles. I know this is a break in period so I did not let engine passing 4000 rmp but I was keeping it in a constant rpm almost all the time. Now I was concern HOW many damage have I did for my car? Is ther any thing I can do now?
 

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The break in period is just to set the rings, seals, etc and it's not for 6000 miles. My manual says 500 (Maybe it's 1000...I'll have to look). Yes, you should vary the RPM's, but if you don't....no big deal. Your car is not damaged, etc. and if it was Subaru would STILL be required to repair it under warranty.
 

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I wonder sometimes with the state of materials science and modern lubricants if run in periods really matter much any more. Most vehicles get treated pretty reasonably duing the first couple thousand klms/miles anyway. I guess you have rental cars and cars owned by immensely stupid people that get flogged from day one.
 

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Break in is a myth (except maybe easy on the brakes). You need to put your foot all the way on the gas pedal and let it shift at 6K periodically. Don't slam your foot on the pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Tnaks for all you guys kindly reply. But actually I feel frenquitenly switch the RPM of my engine is not a easy thing to do since mine is a CVT version. The rpm does was staying between 1500-2000 even I was fully step down the paddle unless I do it sharply. For now the only way I can frenquntly change my RPM is useing the manual mod and I was useing it for these days and hope it will help...........
 

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There are differing opinions on break in periods, and if they are even required on modern equipment.

For example (from LeighAuto):

To Break-In Or Not to Break-In

From a conventional standpoint, the break-in period for your new car is very important, but from our modern standpoint, it is unnecessary. Our modern cars have superior manufacturing standards as compared to their ancestors, and trained engineers give them the break-in treatment before they reach the showroom floor. Unless it is going to cause you major anxiety to refrain from breaking in your new car, we say don’t bother.


Still, manufactures do suggest that you refrain from putting the car under a great deal of stress early, so don’t Tokyo drift your new vehicle out of the dealership. Just drive the new one off the lot the same way you drove the old one onto it, and it’ll all be fine. New cars are ready to drive; it’s what they were built for.
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My personal opinion is to do what you feel comfortable doing. If you bought a used car, you have no idea if the original owner did any kind of break in, and there are hundreds of thousands of used cars on the road. Think about that. It's not like the car blows up, and like it or not.....I bet a good 60+% of new car owners do NOT follow any kind of break in period. Probably higher than that.

If the manufactuer sets a procedure in the owners manual, follow it. Otherwise most of them are just putting some general guidelines in for the first 500-1000 miles. Low RPMs, variable speed, etc.
 

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There are differing opinions on break in periods, and if they are even required on modern equipment.

For example (from LeighAuto):

To Break-In Or Not to Break-In

From a conventional standpoint, the break-in period for your new car is very important, but from our modern standpoint, it is unnecessary. Our modern cars have superior manufacturing standards as compared to their ancestors, and trained engineers give them the break-in treatment before they reach the showroom floor. Unless it is going to cause you major anxiety to refrain from breaking in your new car, we say don’t bother.


Still, manufactures do suggest that you refrain from putting the car under a great deal of stress early, so don’t Tokyo drift your new vehicle out of the dealership. Just drive the new one off the lot the same way you drove the old one onto it, and it’ll all be fine. New cars are ready to drive; it’s what they were built for.
-----------------------------------

My personal opinion is to do what you feel comfortable doing. If you bought a used car, you have no idea if the original owner did any kind of break in, and there are hundreds of thousands of used cars on the road. Think about that. It's not like the car blows up, and like it or not.....I bet a good 60+% of new car owners do NOT follow any kind of break in period. Probably higher than that.

If the manufactuer sets a procedure in the owners manual, follow it. Otherwise most of them are just putting some general guidelines in for the first 500-1000 miles. Low RPMs, variable speed, etc.
Well that's just obviously untrue. Not all modern engine manufacturers have "trained engineers give them the break-in treatment before they reach the showroom floor." In fact, Subaru does not. Acura does, at least for some engines. The trouble with always and never statements is that they're very easy to disprove.
What is LeighAuto? It's not coming up on Google. Are they a local non OEM mechanic shop?
Subaru's only real motivation from a $$$ standpoint is to not have to fix their cars in the warranty period. There's also a concern about a reputation for reliability. If they are telling you to drive a specific way for a specific break in period, I'm inclined to take them at their word. I can't think of any reason they would tell you to break it in if it's not necessary. Is LeighAuto claiming to somehow know more/better that the engineers who designed and tested the vehicle?
But it's your car, so you do what you think is best. That's just my line of reasoning.
But do what you want on your car.
 

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Well that's just obviously untrue. Not all modern engine manufacturers have "trained engineers give them the break-in treatment before they reach the showroom floor." In fact, Subaru does not. Acura does, at least for some engines. The trouble with always and never statements is that they're very easy to disprove.
What is LeighAuto? It's not coming up on Google. Are they a local non OEM mechanic shop?
Subaru's only real motivation from a $$$ standpoint is to not have to fix their cars in the warranty period. There's also a concern about a reputation for reliability. If they are telling you to drive a specific way for a specific break in period, I'm inclined to take them at their word. I can't think of any reason they would tell you to break it in if it's not necessary. Is LeighAuto claiming to somehow know more/better that the engineers who designed and tested the vehicle?
But it's your car, so you do what you think is best. That's just my line of reasoning.
But do what you want on your car.
I posted an article, nothing more. Calm down.

Note where I SPECIFICALLY stated : "If the manufactuer sets a procedure in the owners manual, follow it."

Geez.
 

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I posted an article, nothing more. Calm down.

Note where I SPECIFICALLY stated : "If the manufactuer sets a procedure in the owners manual, follow it."

Geez.
I'm not heated. The information you posted is incorrect and conflicting. I didn't want that to stand unchallenged in case another user or lurker came across it and got the wrong idea.

I was addressing the quality of the information, not attacking you personally.
 

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Ah, the old MotoMan break-in! I've seen it on motorcycle forums but now it makes it here.

Keep in mind that his idea is related to racing, and specifically to getting piston rings to seat as tightly as possible for maximum power. His method is not designed for engine longevity. His method does not address all the other parts of the engine such as bearings, camshafts, valves, etc.

New engines make metal. Parts rub against each other, knocking off little bits of metal that are manufacturing imperfections. Valves may need to wear in the seats.

I, for one, am not convinced the Moto Man method actually improves piston ring seating in our modern automobile engines. Manufacturing tolerances and materials are so good these days. In the old days, one of the arguments for not using synthetic oil during break-in was to improve piston ring seating by not lubricating so well.

Being kind to the metals during break-in should result in less metal in the oil and perhaps more even polishing of the surfaces. High rpms impart drastically higher forces internal to the engine. I can't see any reason to do a high rpm high power break in on an engine you intend to keep for the long haul.

I do change the oil frequently on a new engine. First at 500 miles, then again at about 1500 miles. This is to remove any metal that may be circulating.
 

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While the manual says to vary your engine rpm, I would say that avoiding wide open throttle operation and not going over 4000 rpms is more important, and you did that.

Above all else, CHANGE YOUR OIL now.
 

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While the manual says to vary your engine rpm, I would say that avoiding wide open throttle operation and not going over 4000 rpms is more important, and you did that.

Above all else, CHANGE YOUR OIL now.
This ^

The break in period is only 1,000 miles but you are due for an oil change!
 
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