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2020 Crosstrek Touring (Canada)

I am not the most mechanically inclined person so please forgive me! I recently went to my local tire shop to get my stock wheels and tires switched over to my winter tires and steelies. This is the second year in a row that when I've come back for the retorque, they've asked me to come back a second time because one of the wheels was loose enough that it needed more tightening than normal.

Just seems to be an issue with my steel wheels, never an issue with the stock aluminum ones that I use in the summer. Anything I should be worried about or is it sometimes normal to need a 2nd retorque after a changeover?
 

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2021 Crosstrek Premium 2.0 CVT
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That’s really strange. Normally the secondary torquing is necessary for the alloy or aluminum wheels, not so much if at all on steel rims.
I wouldn’t be concerned, that wheel probably just wasn’t tightened right the first time.
 

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If these are aftermarket steel wheels, you might consider switching them over to a pair of 2nd hand factory alloys(if in budget) down the line. I've never had very good luck with them(aftermarket steels), fitment or quality wise. Having said that, rechecking the torque on any wheel is not a bad idea.
 

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2018 Crosstrek Limited with Eyesight
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2020 Crosstrek Touring (Canada)

I am not the most mechanically inclined person so please forgive me! I recently went to my local tire shop to get my stock wheels and tires switched over to my winter tires and steelies. This is the second year in a row that when I've come back for the retorque, they've asked me to come back a second time because one of the wheels was loose enough that it needed more tightening than normal.

Just seems to be an issue with my steel wheels, never an issue with the stock aluminum ones that I use in the summer. Anything I should be worried about or is it sometimes normal to need a 2nd retorque after a changeover?
It's coincidental that you should raise this.

On my MY18 Limited, I do my own tire change-overs using steel wheels, with pre-mounted winter tires. I bought both at Costco when my Crosstrek was new, back in 2018.

The guideline that most follow here is to re-torque after 100 kilometres of driving, which I did yesterday. Whenever I've done this previously, my torque wrench immediately clicked when I tried each lug. However, yesterday I did notice that for the front wheels only, I did have to add some noticeable extra tightening before the torque wrench clicked.

The back wheels were solid tight as they always have been in the past, and no extra tightening was needed.

I'll follow your advice and recheck the front wheels in another 100 kilometres of driving.

My Crosstrek is Quartz Blue, so I went with Costco's silver coloured steel winter wheels. This will be their fifth winter season coming up, and they do have multiple spots where the paint has blistered and rust is showing underneath. Our winter roads here are ideal for corrosion, with slushy snow, lots of salt, and temperature swings between -10C and +10C.

Will keep you posted on my re-torque.

Cheers,

JayTee
 

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2015 XV Crosstrek Premium CVT, 2019 Impreza Sport MT, 2001 Forester S 4EAT, 2013 Outback Premium CVT
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I have two sets of wheels for a few of my cars. Some are alloy some steel wheels. I always retorqued them after a few drives. As far as I'm concerned that's just common practice.

If I ever get my wheels worked on at a shop, I keep my torque wrench in the car and double check before I drive away. I don't trust shops to do it correctly.

From the tire rack FAQ page

Rectangle Font Parallel Circle Writing
 

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Crosstrek Outdoor, JDM Legacy 2.0 GT spec.B
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To help everyone relax - a friend that worked at Jaguar Land Rover R&D said that they actually tested wheels with different numbers of lug nuts - they found that vehicles with only 2 lug nuts drove perfectly safely ;) - but agreed - they do need to be tight 😂
 

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I was at an auto x and someone put their track tires on their WRX but left off the locking lugs because they were a PITA to put on and off. They figured 4 were plenty and they did properly torque there wheels. On a sharp turn both outer wheels snapped the lugs off and the wheels when flying. That made an interesting sound as it came to a stop. The wheels are hub centric so for the most part the weight of the car is on the center of the wheel not the lug nuts. The lug nuts are there to hold the wheel to the hub. It's the lateral forces where the studs come into play more. For whatever reason, Subaru's wheel studs aren't that robust. Adding stuff like never seize exasperates the issue. The torque spec if for dry threads. It could be they are getting over torqued but I've had more than two or three used Subarus snap wheel studs just torqueing them down properly. I lost two on one wheel with a used Outback while showing my kid how to rotate tires on the 2002 OB we got him used. I took it to get all the studs replaced after a third one snapped when I just touched it with my hand. Obviously someone had overdone it with that particular vehicle. Over the years I've heard of this happening to others. It's probably why I'm so OCD about torqueing my wheels. I think if you take care of the maintenance yourself you are less likely to have an issue.
 

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It could be they are getting over torqued but I've had more than two or three used Subarus snap wheel studs just torqueing them down properly.

Don't be surprised if a previous owner had them overtorqued and this stressed the bolts to the point they could no longer be used properly. The only crossthreaded stud I ever had was when I was busy and let the dealer rotate my wifes tires, I discovered this over a year later when I did the rotation myself. The dealer also didn't do the crossrotation, just the easy Back to front kind.
 

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Aluminum is a more malleable material than steel so while the initial torque appears sufficient, the working of the wheel from driving will sometimes loosen things up. As for the stud snapping, someone obviously cranked it beyond its yield point. After that's done, it will never have its original tensile strength. Always torque properly and re torque aluminum wheels.
 

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Aluminum is a more malleable material than steel so while the initial torque appears sufficient, the working of the wheel from driving will sometimes loosen things up. As for the stud snapping, someone obviously cranked it beyond its yield point. After that's done, it will never have its original tensile strength. Always torque properly and re torque aluminum wheels.
I'm pretty sure all alloy wheels have steel inserts for the lugnut openings. At least the ones I have do. Regardless, I agree 100% that wheels need to be torqued properly. I've seen too many that have been torqued beyond their yield strength.

The danger of too much, too little torque
 
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