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I sometimes watch him if I have a need for some light comedy. You can't say he isn't enthusiastic.
I think people are just swooped with his eccentric style, sometimes if you listen carefully there are parts that he is seriously sharing his knowledge and experience and teach people to be reasonable and do not expect miracle :p
 

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I think people are just swooped with his eccentric style, sometimes if you listen carefully there are parts that he is seriously sharing his knowledge and experience and teach people to be reasonable and do not expect miracle :p
opinionated blowhards have their audience
 

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If you think catch cans are "snake oil", watch it his video. Enough said!😎
Wait a minute buddy, the study quoted on valve deposits was conducted on a 800 000km turbo engine from a 2008 Pontiac Solstice, and the second test was done on a 2015 VW Tiguan, another turbocharged engine.

Sadly, our engines only push up to 1 PSI of air in the piston chambers and that makes a big difference on blowby. You can't just apply the conclusions of this video on our vehicle.

I have a 2014 port injection engine, a year known for heavy oil consumption. After 135 000km, air intake tube was spotless clean and throttle body plates too even though I add at least a quart of oil in between each oil change. I have installed a catch can anyway a year and a half ago, and it catches homeopathic amounts of oil. Absolutely useless in my car.

I highly doubt the newer engines would do worst than that.
 

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Wait a minute buddy, the study quoted on valve deposits was conducted on a 800 000km turbo engine from a 2008 Pontiac Solstice, and the second test was done on a 2015 VW Tiguan, another turbocharged engine.

Sadly, our engines only push up to 1 PSI of air in the piston chambers and that makes a big difference on blowby. You can't just apply the conclusions of this video on our vehicle.

I have a 2014 port injection engine, a year known for heavy oil consumption. After 135 000km, air intake tube was spotless clean and throttle body plates too even though I add at least a quart of oil in between each oil change. I have installed a catch can anyway a year and a half ago, and it catches homeopathic amounts of oil. Absolutely useless in my car.

I highly doubt the newer engines would do worst than that.
That's ok bud. We can agree to disagree.😎 I'll be happy to post a pic of the 1/2" of nasty smelling oily, fuelly, watery crap it caught after only 1000 miles of use/total miles on the engine if you like. The same crap that would have gone in the intake. The pvc valve hose was wet with this crap when I removed it and installed the catch can at about 300 total miles on the engine. 2022 Crosstrek. Basically a brand new engine. How am I doing any harm by preventing this stuff from entering the engine?🤷‍♂️
 

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That's ok bud. We can agree to disagree.😎 I'll be happy to post a pic of the 1/2" of nasty smelling oily, fuelly, watery crap it caught after only 1000 miles of use/total miles on the engine if you like. The same crap that would have gone in the intake. The pvc valve hose was wet with this crap when I removed it and installed the catch can at about 300 total miles on the engine. 2022 Crosstrek. Basically a brand new engine. How am I doing any harm by preventing this stuff from entering the engine?🤷‍♂️
I tend to agree. I have one on my 2019 Impreza and it catches a lot more than most people think. Well a lot more than I expected anyway. I have video's at the bottom and photos showing how much I've removed from the can.

ADD W1 Catch Can install - 2019 Subaru Impreza

> I have installed a catch can anyway a year and a half ago, and it catches homeopathic amounts of oil. <<
I just think you need a better catch can TBH. A lot of us have significant amounts
 

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We can agree to disagree.😎
I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.

I'll be happy to post a pic of the 1/2" of nasty smelling oily, fuelly, watery crap it caught after only 1000 miles of use/total miles on the engine if you like.
And I'll be happy to tell you that 95% of it is water and gas that will evaporate without doing any harm to your engine, just like the coffee-like solution that @peaty filmed in his videos. If you separate the oil from the rest you'll end up with a teaspoon of oil for your thousand mile, homeopathic amounts.

How am I doing any harm by preventing this stuff from entering the engine?🤷‍♂️
You aren't, I never said that and that is why I still have my useless one installed. Only way you could be hurting the engine is by using a vented catch can since it would allow unmetered air into the system.

I agree that engines all act in their own way and some may have more blowby than others, but since the pcv hose plugs into the intake prior to the throttle body, an engine that spits lots of oil vapor would end up coating the inside of the intake tube and throttle body at the same time as the valves, just like this:

Automotive fuel system Automotive exhaust Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim

If my intake and throttle body stayed spotless clean after 135 000km, blowby shouldn't have any effect on my valves either, even though my catch can collects some of that coffee soup that ends up evaporating. It's pretty easy to inspect for those who are wondering about their car and still, replacing the PCV valve would be the first thing to do before adding a catch can.

I'm not saying people shouldn't to install one, just straightening the facts and sharing my real-world experience about the usefulness of it.
 

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2022 Crosstrek Premium 6 Speed MT
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Not gonna argue with you!
I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.


And I'll be happy to tell you that 95% of it is water and gas that will evaporate without doing any harm to your engine, just like the coffee-like solution that @peaty filmed in his videos. If you separate the oil from the rest you'll end up with a teaspoon of oil for your thousand mile, homeopathic amounts.


You aren't, I never said that and that is why I still have my useless one installed. Only way you could be hurting the engine is by using a vented catch can since it would allow unmetered air into the system.

I agree that engines all act in their own way and some may have more blowby than others, but since the pcv hose plugs into the intake prior to the throttle body, an engine that spits lots of oil vapor would end up coating the inside of the intake tube and throttle body at the same time as the valves, just like this:

View attachment 311201
If my intake and throttle body stayed spotless clean after 135 000km, blowby shouldn't have any effect on my valves either, even though my catch can collects some of that coffee soup that ends up evaporating. It's pretty easy to inspect for those who are wondering about their car and still, replacing the PCV valve would be the first thing to do before adding a catch can.

I'm not saying people shouldn't to install one, just straightening the facts and sharing my real-world experience about the usefulness of it.
👍👍 Not gonna argue with you. All I'm telling you is my catch can is getting crap in it that isn't going into my intake. That's all I care about. I can care less if anyone else uses one. My engine is a 2022. Maybe I'm getting more crankcase crap than your engine? That engineering explained youtube page is pretty informative. Check out the one on rev hang. I learned a lot and ended up doing the rev hang delete on my 2022 6spd. Complete game changer.👍
 

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I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.


And I'll be happy to tell you that 95% of it is water and gas that will evaporate without doing any harm to your engine, just like the coffee-like solution that @peaty filmed in his videos. If you separate the oil from the rest you'll end up with a teaspoon of oil for your thousand mile, homeopathic amounts.


You aren't, I never said that and that is why I still have my useless one installed. Only way you could be hurting the engine is by using a vented catch can since it would allow unmetered air into the system.

I agree that engines all act in their own way and some may have more blowby than others, but since the pcv hose plugs into the intake prior to the throttle body, an engine that spits lots of oil vapor would end up coating the inside of the intake tube and throttle body at the same time as the valves, just like this:

View attachment 311201
If my intake and throttle body stayed spotless clean after 135 000km, blowby shouldn't have any effect on my valves either, even though my catch can collects some of that coffee soup that ends up evaporating. It's pretty easy to inspect for those who are wondering about their car and still, replacing the PCV valve would be the first thing to do before adding a catch can.

I'm not saying people shouldn't to install one, just straightening the facts and sharing my real-world experience about the usefulness of it.
Maybe your engine is different but on my 2022, the pvc vents AFTER the throttle body so I would hope that the throttle body stays spotless or you have some air filter issues.🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️ What year is your engine?
 

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So, a 2014 port injected engine would have totally different build-up characteristics than a 2018+ GDI. Just saying you can't compare your results with the newer engines.
 

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I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.


And I'll be happy to tell you that 95% of it is water and gas that will evaporate without doing any harm to your engine, just like the coffee-like solution that @peaty filmed in his videos. If you separate the oil from the rest you'll end up with a teaspoon of oil for your thousand mile, homeopathic amounts.


You aren't, I never said that and that is why I still have my useless one installed. Only way you could be hurting the engine is by using a vented catch can since it would allow unmetered air into the system.

I agree that engines all act in their own way and some may have more blowby than others, but since the pcv hose plugs into the intake prior to the throttle body, an engine that spits lots of oil vapor would end up coating the inside of the intake tube and throttle body at the same time as the valves, just like this:

View attachment 311201
If my intake and throttle body stayed spotless clean after 135 000km, blowby shouldn't have any effect on my valves either, even though my catch can collects some of that coffee soup that ends up evaporating. It's pretty easy to inspect for those who are wondering about their car and still, replacing the PCV valve would be the first thing to do before adding a catch can.

I'm not saying people shouldn't to install one, just straightening the facts and sharing my real-world experience about the usefulness of it.
I just realized when someone else commented on here. You have a 2014 port injected engine. 🤦‍♂️ Sorry but your catch can experience on your Subaru is irrelevant in this case... I would not run a catch can in a port injected engine. Not necessary at all! We can at least agree on that.😎
 

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Maldedo said:
I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.
<<

100%, I put it on my NA motor kind of just to see how it works, because it's DI. My last Subaru was a BRZ and it's a hybrid system to avoid the issue. I agree that most will flash off however, I'm not sure going by a clean throttle body means clean valves. The valves are a lot hotter and more prone to getting carbon build up because of that. Mostly thinking out loud though. In any case better to catch it than let it through. Properly installed, it's not going to hurt.
 

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Maybe your engine is different but on my 2022, the pvc vents AFTER the throttle body so I would hope that the throttle body stays spotless or you have some air filter issues.🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️ What year is your engine?
My 2019 is like that too.
Computer network Electrical wiring Automotive tire Circuit component Electronic engineering
 

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Maldedo said:
I hope we can at least agree that these things are a lot more beneficial to turbocharged engines than they are to na.
<<

100%, I put it on my NA motor kind of just to see how it works, because it's DI. My last Subaru was a BRZ and it's a hybrid system to avoid the issue. I agree that most will flash off however, I'm not sure going by a clean throttle body means clean valves. The valves are a lot hotter and more prone to getting carbon build up because of that. Mostly thinking out loud though. In any case better to catch it than let it through. Properly installed, it's not going to hurt.
Agree...👍 Like I mentioned before, my 2022 DI FB20 PCV line dumps the crankcase vapors/crap after the throttle body so my throttle body better stay spotless.
 

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Properly installed, it's not going to hurt.
I agree, as long as you don't see cold temps. I'd be running one if I wasn't afraid of a line freezing during winter. There's a TON of moisture which the can will accumulate in winter, increasing the chances of a frozen line. Don't want to deal with the consequences of a frozen PCV line, so that's why I am not running one.

I run one on two of my other cars, but they are not driven in winter.
 
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I drive my Impreza mostly in the winter. It gets sub zero here in KS, last year -18°F was the coldest. I haven't had an issue myself.
 

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I drive my Impreza mostly in the winter. It gets sub zero here in KS, last year -18°F was the coldest. I haven't had an issue myself.
Crawford does not recommend them in cold temps. My buddy had his freeze up on him and it caused his rear main to burp out oil. He took it off.....
 
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Check out the one on rev hang. I learned a lot and ended up doing the rev hang delete on my 2022 6spd. Complete game changer.👍
Sorry, off topic of this thread but would you mind elaborating on this "rev hang delete"? Any and all details appreciated!

Thanks 👍
 
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