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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you lock the car and the engine cover is not closed, in some number of seconds the horn honking alarm will go off. An open or partially open engine cover is not shown with the "open doors" alerts, but is somehow known to the car.

There is a moveable rectangle of metal with a ">PP<" on it to the right of center at the front of the car where the hood will rest when closed. You can push down on this metal a tiny bit, and it seems like a closed hood just might push it down, but ever so slightly.

Anybody know if that is the "button" that tells the car the hood is closed? Like the button on a refrigerator that is pushed to turn off the refrigerator light... (perhaps only older fridges)

Or does anybody know how the "closed or opened" engine cover hood is detected?

I'm wanting to defeat such a switch temporarily for some 12V battery "draw" testing (with doors locked versus open) on a 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid...

Thanks,

Apple
 

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@R P recommended a BT monitor that I also bought and I love it. No more fussing with the hood (since you have to "start" the car to open the hood).

@R P is Canadian, here's the one I bought in the US (without the free sample of Moosehead):

 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The hood switch is built into (integrated) the latch assembly.

Easiest method is to just close the latch manually with a screw driver and that will close the switch. BE SURE to release the latch before closing the hood.
Big Thanks - just what I was needing. I tied a rag onto the raised hood striker that triggers the latch as a reminder to be darn sure to release/open the latch before closing.

And yes I was able to test the draw on the 12V "starter" battery of the 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid (which does more than just start the car - does all electronics when engine is not running) when the car is locked. Unlocked, the draw is 2.3ish Amps, and locked, the draw is 2.15 Amps. (In other words, yes, Houston, we have a problem... Should be down around 50 milliamps...)
 

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Big Thanks - just what I was needing. I tied a rag onto the raised hood striker that triggers the latch as a reminder to be darn sure to release/open the latch before closing.

And yes I was able to test the draw on the 12V "starter" battery of the 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid (which does more than just start the car - does all electronics when engine is not running) when the car is locked. Unlocked, the draw is 2.3ish Amps, and locked, the draw is 2.15 Amps. (In other words, yes, Houston, we have a problem... Should be down around 50 milliamps...)
Have you measured the "draw" while the car is "off"?

What I see is that there's a spike when the fuel evap system kicks in, about five hours after the car is turned off. Then nothing.

Please could you tell "Houston" what exactly your problem is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@R P recommended a BT monitor that I also bought and I love it. No more fussing with the hood (since you have to "start" the car to open the hood).

@R P is Canadian, here's the one I bought in the US (without the free sample of Moosehead):

AstroKats - For the 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid the hood latch is possibly the only thing that's not electric, so no need to start the car. A manual system with a lever under the dash pulls a cable that releases the stage one latch of the hood...

Cool gizmo you shared, though. What I wanted to test with the car locked and the key fob "off" was the draw of all the electronics in the car that are still needing current when the car is just sitting entirely shut off. To do that the battery's ground has to be disconnected and you multimeter between the disconnected cable and the battery's ground terminal. (Locked uses a bit less, but either locked or unlocked, we have a 2+ Amps draw on the hybrid's 12V battery, and that ain't good.)
 

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AstroKats - For the 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid the hood latch is possibly the only thing that's not electric, so no need to start the car. A manual system with a lever under the dash pulls a cable that releases the stage one latch of the hood...

Cool gizmo you shared, though. What I wanted to test with the car locked and the key fob "off" was the draw of all the electronics in the car that are still needing current when the car is just sitting entirely shut off. To do that the battery's ground has to be disconnected and you multimeter between the disconnected cable and the battery's ground terminal. (Locked uses a bit less, but either locked or unlocked, we have a 2+ Amps draw on the hybrid's 12V battery, and that ain't good.)
See previous post...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you measured the "draw" while the car is "off"?

What I see is that there's a spike when the fuel evap system kicks in, about five hours after the car is turned off. Then nothing.

Please could you tell "Houston" what exactly your problem is?
Chuckle. Houston, I think I spelled out the problem in a reply or two. It doesn't take too many days for the hybrid's 12V to be drained to the point to not be able to start the car. Parasitic Drain is maybe what they call it. All draw testing has always been with the car "off."
 

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Chuckle. Houston, I think I spelled out the problem in a reply or two. It doesn't take too many days for the hybrid's 12V to be drained to the point to not be able to start the car. Parasitic Drain is maybe what they call it. All draw testing has always been with the car "off."
Have you tested the parasitic drain when the car is supposedly "off"?

I solved the problem with Odyssey batteries in both cars. No problems since then...
 

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I'm wanting to defeat such a switch temporarily for some 12V battery "draw" testing (with doors locked versus open) on a 2019 Crosstrek Hybrid...
Could you route the measurement wires through the grille?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Could you route the measurement wires through the grille?
Possibly... But Biktrax advice to just trip the latch with a screwdriver worked just fine... Easiest with the engine hood open but the car tricked into thinking it's closed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Have you tested the parasitic drain when the car is supposedly "off"?

I solved the problem with Odyssey batteries in both cars. No problems since then...
The parasitic drain with the car as "off" as it can be is what I've been measuring. "Supposedly off" kind of sums up a problem for everybody. Modern cars have a lot more to power in terms of computer type memory of stuff when the car is supposedly off, like "listening" for when the active fob is near, etc. Our issue is that the typical 30 to 50 Milliamps drain is bumped up to 2.3 Amps. And that higher draw has only been since the dealer replaced the Data Communication Module which wasn't, uh, communicating. After a 4 day sitting (not starting/not driving) the car wouldn't start without a charge or jump. Otherwise, sitting 6 weeks without driving, even the 30 to 50 Milliamps drain can bring a battery to it's knees, especially the factory Panasonic. Oh, and yes, I did try removing the fuse for the DCM to disable it, and that only reduced the parasitic draw by 200 Milliamps or so...

So yeah, a better quality battery would have to help. And while I confess to not really knowing any of this stuff and only going by what I've found out online (like how to even measure the parasitic drain), some of it doesn't add up. A 48 Amp Hour 12V battery (typical car) draining at 2 Amps should be fully dead after just 24 hours, but the 12V battery has only sagged from the fullest charge of 12.45 V or so down to 12.12 V or so. And then when testing you have to watch out for surface charge, which means any charging (battery charger or the driving of the car charging the hybrid battery) results in a battery that will test high unless you let it sit for 5 or 6 hours (or other methods involving kind of shorting it and letting the sparks fly - which I, uh, have chosen not to do).

The car still starts at 12.12 V, so since the not-starting was where we had a garage and the car sat unlocked, I figured I had to test with it locked as we have it here at the cabin, sitting out and locked so no bears hop in and drive away. Perhaps while locked the parasitic drain would measure much less. It measured a bit less, but still above 2 Amps.

We do have a storage battery "jump starter" we bought, so theoretically we couldn't get stuck anywhere. Hoping to test that before we really do have to drive the car, so I'm actually wanting it to drain down now! Also, I'm tracking all my measuring of the battery and the parasitic drainage for when we're back near the dealer. Leave it to them to pull each and every fuse one at a time to track down the problem!

Sorry to blather on. Sure did get the info I needed via this forum post though. Thanks to all...
 

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That really is strange. I've seen the dips on the voltage chart when approaching the car with the keyless fob and it wakes up but it seems you've ruled that out, too. 2A parasitic draw is crazy...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just for a little update on an aspect I pointed out - that the car will happily let you lock it with the hood unlatched, but then in some number of seconds or a minute start yelling at you (honkingly)... That's still true and there is no display like for other doors that are open when the car is off, but if the car is running - engine on - then it does freak out about the front hood being unlatched and it shows the front hood being open (like it does for other doors) and also a notice comes up that the car will turn off in some number of seconds. So it is smart enough to know it's not good to drive anywhere with the hood unlatched...
 

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You may also want to try pulling the audio amp fuse or disconnecting completely under the passenger seat if you have it. Have seen some with power draw and not shutting down when the car is off.

Also have you had the ignition coil recall done? ---->>>"Subaru of America, Inc. (Subaru) is recalling certain 2017-2019 Subaru Impreza and 2018-2019 Crosstrek vehicles. The Engine Control Module (ECM) may continue to power the ignition coil after the engine is shut off, causing a short circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
You may also want to try pulling the audio amp fuse or disconnecting completely under the passenger seat if you have it. Have seen some with power draw and not shutting down when the car is off.

Also have you had the ignition coil recall done? ---->>>"Subaru of America, Inc. (Subaru) is recalling certain 2017-2019 Subaru Impreza and 2018-2019 Crosstrek vehicles. The Engine Control Module (ECM) may continue to power the ignition coil after the engine is shut off, causing a short circuit.
Thanks for the tips. Did try pulling a few more fuses, including the Ignition Coil and the Audio, either of which barely lowered the draw... (I don't think we have a separate audio amp - nothing under the passenger seat...)

* should add that now I find more Ignition Coil related fuses. IGCT SCENE (whatever that would be) and IG A-1, IG A-2, IG B-1, etc. - Though I figure when we are near Dealerland they'll have computers to hunt for these load drawing circuits, I guess I can try all the IG ones... *

The recall stuff is funny because it looks like Subaru isn't releasing VIN numbers (so can't look up at NTSHA, or maybe you can and our VIN isn't included), but it hasn't been too long for the ECM programming recall and Ignition Coil replacement, and it sounds like Subaru lets the dealer know then the dealer has 60 days to contact the customers... (Didn't find the ECM in the fuse box diagrams, so figured pulling the Ignition Coil fuse would test that.)

Thanks!
 

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Its odd that this recall does not have a VIN range like most, maybe they have better parts tracking... but the TSB "2018-2019 Crosstrek 5/09/17 – 5/08/2019" Production dates.
Running the VIN here should yield the same results "Subaru Recalls" - But since its still parts limited availability it may not show. IF you want I can run it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Its odd that this recall does not have a VIN range like most, maybe they have better parts tracking... but the TSB "2018-2019 Crosstrek 5/09/17 – 5/08/2019" Production dates.
Running the VIN here should yield the same results "Subaru Recalls" - But since its still parts limited availability it may not show. IF you want I can run it.
Just tried running our VIN and still no recalls. So many cars maybe they have to choreograph the customers coming in. The DCM was non-functioning for over a year, and it was after they replaced that the few-days battery drain happened. Emailed the service guy who said his "foreman" said that pulling the DCM fuse doesn't always stop the DCM from sucking up power with the car off, but must disconnect it. I've seen the YouTube Vids for that and going to go with the extended warranty we have and next week get into town to let the dealer look at it. He also emailed back about disconnecting the ABS as something to try, but no fuses are labeled anything like ABS, so probably not going to try disconnecting any parts under the hood. That little canister that says "Nitrogen Under High Pressure" or something is unnerving enough. You unlock the car and open the engine hood, and just about then it screeches a sound and shakes a bit. Every time. Weird...

thanks
 
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