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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am excited to announce that I will very soon be offering tuning for the 2018+ FB20D!

What started out as seeking tuning options for my upcoming turbo kit, soon turned into something else. To the best of my knowledge nobody currently offers tuning for the 2018+ FB20D so I took it upon myself to start. Am I as good as Throttle Happy or XRT? No. Am I competent and know what I'm doing? Yes.

uniden-express from this forum recently purchased my 2018 UEL header prototype. With the car in the air I took the opportunity to weld in a wideband o2 sensor bung to the factory header. I then installed and wired in an AEM UEGO. I began to log with Romraider/subaruEdit and modify the factory tune via subaruEdit software. I quickly became consumed with trying to extract as much power as possible out of this new FB20 engine with just a tune. I have some tuning experience and have always been a numbers geek. The process of logging data, examining the logs and interpreting the data, then making changes and testing those changes is fun for me and as it turns out I'm actually quite good at it. After countless hours and multiple tanks of gas, I'm nearly finished with a 93 octane tune for my 2018. I'll get into the details later, but the short of it is that I was able to knock a solid half second off the 0-60 time (CVT) with more power and better driveability throughout the entire powerband. This is with the factory intake, factory exhaust, and over 7k on the factory airfilter. Supporting mods would help take full advantage of this tune.

What you will need to tune your car:

A tactrix openport 2.0

subaruEdit FB "Lite" software available here: epifanSoftware | subaruEdit | Versions & prices (you will need to email him to purchase the Lite version).

As far as price goes, I'm thinking $300. I can do a 91 octane tune and also customize the tune to your needs.

I will start with offering a tune for the 2018+ then move on to the 2012-2017.
 

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Man thats a dangerous proposition,

Before you know it youll have drivers looking to lower their crosstreks and make them stiffer and more agressive. Might even have to add a spoiler and maybe paint it in World Rally blue :p

What kinds of numbers are you posting on the new tune? It would be awesome to make a bit more power but I still havent decided if its really necessary. The crosstrek isnt a racecar, but its a great little over landing, camping and hiking delivery vehicle.
 

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Man thats a dangerous proposition,

Before you know it youll have drivers looking to lower their crosstreks and make them stiffer and more agressive. Might even have to add a spoiler and maybe paint it in World Rally blue

What kinds of numbers are you posting on the new tune? It would be awesome to make a bit more power but I still havent decided if its really necessary. The crosstrek isnt a racecar, but its a great little over landing, camping and hiking delivery vehicle.
I agree, the Crosstrek is obviously not a race car, but after a lift and some big tires I would like a bit of the power back. loading it up with gear, and potentially skid plates in a bumper would only make it slower, so every little bit of power helps imo.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Let's take a look at the stock tune and why there's plenty of room for improvement (power wise).

Looking at one of the stock open loop fuel maps, it's clear that there is an emphasis on fuel mileage. Even at 1 or 1.1g/r it doesn't get to the good stuff until 3,200rpm and then it quickly becomes too rich. So in classic Subaru form, it goes from too lean to too rich.
stock fuel map.jpg



As far as timing goes, there is a dizzying array of timing tables, 34 base tables to be exact. And 6 feedback knock correction advance tables. If it ran only the most aggressive base table and only the most aggressive knock correction advance table, it would have decent timing (not the most timing for power, but close enough). But it's anyone's guess what combination is picked under what circumstances.
stock timing.jpg

Before I could even begin to adjust the timing, I had to standardize every table to match each other. This took the better part of forever. And every time I make a small adjustment on one, I have to change them all. A slow and tedious process indeed.




The last problem is this car's reluctance to go into open loop. In every 0-60 run I do the same procedure: come to a stop and then put it to the floor. As you can see from the commanded air:fuel ratios, it didn't even go into open loop until 4,800rpm! At this point it was already doing 30mph. Remember, as long as it is in closed loop, it is basically running 14.7:1, NOT what we want for maximum power! Then when it finally does get into the proper AFR range for power, it's there for about 1.5 seconds before then becoming too rich.
stock pull.jpg

What I did was set it up so that anything other than cruising or very light acceleration would kick it into OL. Even in the OL tables I kept it stoich at 0.3g/r and gave it the correct amount of fuel for power in the higher load cells. From a standstill my tune would humiliate a stock 2018, since I was hitting 30mph almost half a second before the stock tune and kept the half second lead all the way up to 60pmh. Some quick math says thats over 20' ahead at 30mph and over 40' ahead at 60mph.

Sorry, I didn't realize the pics would be so small! They are larger and easier to read on my FB page.
 

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This could be undertaken AFTER the engine has gone out of warranty. I doubt that any dealer would honor the warranty due to an engine/tranny problem with this tune installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The real question for us 6MT owners: can you leave everything stock EXCEPT the rev hang?

I don't mind the lack of power and prefer to keep my car as OEM as possible, but I just want my stupid throttle to close when I let off the gas to shift. I'd pay money for that.
Sure, I have access to overrun tables. Since I don't have access to a manual to test in real time, it would take some back and forth feedback from you to get it exactly how you want.
overrun.jpg
 

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My openport 2 arrives tomorrow, I guess you can tell I'm excited! Still have my eyes on your turbo kit....

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Sorry, I didn't realize the pics would be so small! They are larger and easier to read on my FB page.
To add insult to injury, the pics are smaller for me after I click on them! Maybe it's just me, but I thought it was supposed to be the other way around! :)


On the subject at hand, great to see that there's an active discussion on tuning from one of our sponsors! I believe the community will benefit greatly from this.
 

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This could be undertaken AFTER the engine has gone out of warranty. I doubt that any dealer would honor the warranty due to an engine/tranny problem with this tune installed.
We had a similar discussion on tuning and warranty in the past with the previous generation. Granted there isn't a large number of tuned engines out there, but we haven't had a report of a warranty being refused on a tuned engine, yet... Of course, there can always be a first.
 

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We had a similar discussion on tuning and warranty in the past with the previous generation. Granted there isn't a large number of tuned engines out there, but we haven't had a report of a warranty being refused on a tuned engine, yet... Of course, there can always be a first.
Hypothetically if I save the factory maps before tuning, couldn't I just flash them back if I ever needed to take the XV into the dealership?

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Hypothetically if I save the factory maps before tuning, couldn't I just flash them back if I ever needed to take the XV into the dealership?

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It depends on the device you use to install the tune. I used a device on my 2012 Mustang that copied and saved the factory tune in case you needed to go back.
 

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Also, at least it's been discovered that the ECU has a counter of sorts on the amount of times it's been flashed so in theory, its possible for Subaru to find out that ECU has been flashed by someone other than Subaru. Of course, that would depend on if they were actually looking for that evidence.
 

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Just as a side on ECU tunes: I bought and installed a "performance" tune for my 2012 Mustang V6. Neither that nor the CAI that I installed made a lick of difference. My 2014 Mustang GT 5.0 had so much more in performance that I would ever use in a hundred years. Being a risk averse individual, I left that puppy alone.
 

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Just as a side on ECU tunes: I bought and installed a "performance" tune for my 2012 Mustang V6. Neither that nor the CAI that I installed made a lick of difference. My 2014 Mustang GT 5.0 had so much more in performance that I would ever use in a hundred years. Being a risk averse individual, I left that puppy alone.
I have a tuner on my Jeep. I got it mostly to tell the computer about the axle ratio and tire size changes. But it also came with a couple of tunes. I run the "economy" tune. I did notice that it flattened out the lack of torque below 2,000 RPM which is important with a manual transmission. And I can get mileage in the 18's on the freeway which is pretty good for a big barn of a vehicle with a lift and big tires, not to mention the "less than aerodynamic" winch bumper and other modifications.
 

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Just as a side on ECU tunes: I bought and installed a "performance" tune for my 2012 Mustang V6. Neither that nor the CAI that I installed made a lick of difference.
I should have added "at least for the way I drive". I'm the antithesis of a speed demon. I pull as many G's in my crosstrek as I did in the GT which ain't much. So then you might ask why I did the performance tune and CAI for my V6? Well, I got caught up in the moment because of the bad influence of my allfordmustangs forum. Mistake! :embarrassed::icon_lol:
 

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Just as a side on ECU tunes: I bought and installed a "performance" tune for my 2012 Mustang V6. Neither that nor the CAI that I installed made a lick of difference. My 2014 Mustang GT 5.0 had so much more in performance that I would ever use in a hundred years. Being a risk averse individual, I left that puppy alone.
I have a tuner on my Jeep. I got it mostly to tell the computer about the axle ratio and tire size changes. But it also came with a couple of tunes. I run the "economy" tune. I did notice that it flattened out the lack of torque below 2,000 RPM which is important with a manual transmission. And I can get mileage in the 18's on the freeway which is pretty good for a big barn of a vehicle with a lift and big tires, not to mention the "less than aerodynamic" winch bumper and other modifications.
I should have added "at least for the way I drive". I'm the antithesis of a speed demon. I pull as many G's in my crosstrek as I did in the GT which ain't much. So then you might ask why I did the performance tune and CAI for my V6? Well, I got caught up in the moment because of the bad influence of my allfordmustangs forum. Mistake! :embarrassed::icon_lol:
That all brings up the usability of the tune vs. just MORE POWER!

I believe most tunes targeting the FB20 have been more about usability or enhanced drivability rather than ripping the rubber off the tires power. Of course, there's only so much power you can get out of a 2.0L non-turbo engine. I would be happy with flatter performance (ie fewer or no dips in power during acceleration) AND a reduction in the amount of PZEV happening so that shorter trips don't actually use as much gas!
 

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That all brings up the usability of the tune vs. just MORE POWER!

I believe most tunes targeting the FB20 have been more about usability or enhanced drivability rather than ripping the rubber off the tires power. Of course, there's only so much power you can get out of a 2.0L non-turbo engine. I would be happy with flatter performance (ie fewer or no dips in power during acceleration) AND a reduction in the amount of PZEV happening so that shorter trips don't actually use as much gas!
Spot on Richard. Tunes for these cars are for better driveability than outright chest beating power. Often after a tune like this, you will find smoother idling, better fuel economy, gear changes in CVT improved and as a side effect, some extra torque/power that is more useable. If you can get your head around those things you will find most people will be happy to receive those benefits.

The way I see it, if you want more power, drop a wad of dough on a turbo or SC kit, or sell it and go a WRX. The XV's as far as Im concerned have enough power to do the job efficiently and economically as it is. Can the driveability of the driveline improve at low speeds and rpm's? Absolutely! I think we all want that tbh. With a tune like the OP is suggesting, I for one will be looking at this for that exact reason.

I know Matt from Throttle Happy tuning quite well. I would consider him as a good friend. He has tuned my 07 LGT since I bought the car and when the time comes and he has a decent tune for the 18 Crosstrek, I will get him to tune that also. The OP looks like he is in the same game as Matt and looks like he is onto a good thing. Be aware that Subaru can scan your ECU for evidence it has been flashed by a non OEM technician, so if you do not care about the remainder of your warranty that's fine. But I know I will be waiting for my warranty to run out before I choose this path.

Thats just my 2c worth
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Also, at least it's been discovered that the ECU has a counter of sorts on the amount of times it's been flashed so in theory, its possible for Subaru to find out that ECU has been flashed by someone other than Subaru. Of course, that would depend on if they were actually looking for that evidence.
Hopefully when they see my flash count as being in the triple digits, they'll dismiss it as a computer glitch :angel:

And yeah, I don't work for Subaru so I don't know their protocol but I'm guessing when showing up for engine or drivetrain warranty work on a sti you are assumed guilty until proven innocent. Hopefully the Crosstrek isn't on their radar, especially as far as ecu tuning goes.
 

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Hopefully when they see my flash count as being in the triple digits, they'll dismiss it as a computer glitch :angel:

And yeah, I don't work for Subaru so I don't know their protocol but I'm guessing when showing up for engine or drivetrain warranty work on a sti you are assumed guilty until proven innocent. Hopefully the Crosstrek isn't on their radar, especially as far as ecu tuning goes.
That's under the assumption that they care... It's possible that unless the service department gets push back from Subaru, they might just honour the warranty for the 'common' stuff. Of course, it may be different if your STI has stress damage of too much torque applied to various parts of the drivetrain. :)
 
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