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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello! This is a bit of an introductory post for me but I'm not new to Subarus. I still have my '99 2.5RS (original owner, purchased it new) which is waiting on a full STi drivetrain swap, we had a 2005 Forester XT that was my wife's daily (sold in 2015), and now the 2017 Crosstrek is her new daily.

I bought the Crosstrek through Costco's Auto Purchasing Program which I HIGHLY recommend. In addition to the awesome discount and totally hassle-free buying experience, we also received a coupon for 50% off up to $200 towards parts/accessories. I used the coupon to buy the Subaru rear spoiler which came to $167 out the door ;-) I just finished installing it myself and took a lot of pics along the way for everyone's benefit. Everyone talks about how they were nervous drilling holes in their car for the spoiler install and this is day 5 of owning ours so... yeah :)

On the 5th day owning our Crosstrek, I drilled holes in my car. Enjoy the show!

Tools/Materials

- Spoiler w/nuts
- Template
- Instructions
- Painter's tape
- Newspaper or similar for masking/protection
- Spring-loaded center punch, OR center punch and hammer
- Drill
- Drill bits (3mm, 5mm, 9mm, 12mm) You can also opt to use regular/fractional bits as close to these in size as you can get.
- Deburring tool or small utility knife
- Loctite Blue thread locker (optional)
- 10mm deep socket
- Short extension
- Socket wrench
- Primer
- Touch up paint matching your body color
- Shop vac/vacuum
- Compressed air/blower (optional)


First up are the pics of the template (which I have already cut out) with the spoiler, the nuts, and provided instructions. The template comes printed on a long rectangular piece of paper which is rolled up tightly and rubber banded. I unrolled mine and taped it to the wall for a couple days to try and get some of the curl out of it because it is annoying to cut out while it keeps curling up.

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
After cutting out the template, open the rear hatch and remove the center and both side trim pieces around the back window. I didn't use any tools for removal, just carefully pull the pieces away from the window and they will release from their clips/holes. Set the pieces aside in a safe place as reinstalling them will be the last step in the whole process.

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
With the rear hatch window trim pieces removed, you can see the holes/cutouts which will give you access to install the nuts once you've drilled your holes and put the spoiler on the hatch.

The instructions tell you to pull the rear wiper sprayer hose out of the hole to protect it while you drill and to give you room to install the nut.

Next you will align and tape the template to the top of the rear hatch. Take your time and make sure the template is lined up exactly where you want it because this is how you will know where to mark and drill your holes!!

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
There are 4 locations on the template to mark with your center punch. With the template taped in place exactly where you want it and aligned properly, use your center punch to mark exactly in the center of the 4 locations to drill. BE CAREFUL - DON'T OVERDO IT! If you go too hard on the center punch you can/will dent the thin metal of the hatch! I used a Home Depot/Husky brand spring-loaded center punch set to full pressure and I punched it twice in each spot. Once was probably enough!

Once you've marked the 4 drilling locations, remove the template from the hatch and you should see your marked drilling locations.

Next I masked around where the holes would be drilled with painter's tape and paper to protect the roof and hatch from the metal shavings created by drilling.

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
When drilling the holes, you should start with a smaller bit and work your way up to the largest size bit you'll be using. The two inner holes stop at 9mm whereas the outter holes should be 12mm.

Starting with the 3mm bit, drill each of the 4 locations. Next step up to the 5mm and drill each location. Then drill each location with the 9mm. At this point you're finished with the 2 inner holes. Finish drilling using the 12mm bit on the two outter holes.

Phew!! Hopefully all your drilling went without any issues. You can take a breath at this point, you've completed the hardest part of the install :) Make sure all your holes are as clean as possible and free of burs or shavings sticking out or up. Use a deburring tool, small utility blade, or even a small file to clean the edges of the holes. Be careful not to enlarge the holes any further or misshape them. You just don't want real rough edges.

Note: Because I'm anal, and I didn't want metal shavings hanging around and scratching things up, I used a shop vac to vacuum up as much of the shavings as I could then used compressed air to blow anything remaining from the car each time I drilled.

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Now that the hard part is done, you need to put some primer and touch-up paint around the edges of the holes where you drilled to protect against rust and corrosion.

I started by placing tape securely over the holes I drilled, then I opened the hatch and carefully hit the back/underside of the holes with a couple short bursts of primer until I had coverage. You don't want to go crazy with the primer, and you don't want runs, just light coats. Then I removed the tape from the holes on the topside of the hatch and applied primer around the inside and top edge of the holes. I did this using a small piece of the cardboard backer from a notepad. A paper matchstick works well for this, or a Q-tip. You can use anything that will allow you to apply the primer lightly while still getting things covered well. To give myself a bit of primer to dip into, I just sprayed the primer onto a scrap of paper until it pooled a bit. Watch your overspray and stay away from the car when you do this!

Allow the primer to dry completely. You can accelerate drying time with a hair dryer but steer clear of things like heat guns as you can't control the heat very well and could do damage. You just want some warm air, you're not baking anything.

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Next up is applying the touch-up paint. I got my Desert Khaki touch-up paint from the dealership because we get a nice 20% discount, but you can get it online as well to avoid the dealer prices.

Apply the touch-up paint around the inside, outside, and inner edge of the holes. Again, use light application of the paint and be careful not to glob it on or cause runs. Then once again you want to allow enough time for the paint to dry completely.

Once the paint is dry, you can install the spoiler itself by carefully lowering the spoiler's bolts down into the holes. I was able to do this by myself and get the nuts threaded on but it may be easier with a second pair of hands to help hold things. Be careful when threading the nuts onto the bolts - you do not want to crossthread anything. Also, keep in mind these are fairly small nuts and bolts and you do not need to use guerrilla strength when tightening them. I've read several installs where folks snapped those little bolts when tightening them down. It really doesn't take a lot so go easy on them!

I didn't use a torque wrench, but I did use a 1/4" socket wrench to limit the force I was exerting and just tightened each bolt a bit in sequence until all were nice and snug. Leave them just loose enough at first so you can check the fit and alignment of the spoiler. Once you've got everything where you want it, go ahead and snug them all down.


Note: I used Loctite Blue threadlocker on my bolts just for some piece of mind. It is not suggested in the instructions so it is optional.

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Now all that is left is to reinstall the rear window trim pieces. Again, check your strength here - everything lines up and goes together easily so just put them in place and press firmly with your hand. Install the sides first, then the center piece last.

Once your trim is reinstalled, close the hatch and stand back to admire your handy work! Nice job, you just saved yourself a wad of cash that you can put towards other stuff for your car :)

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Here's a few outside shots of the finished product. I hope this helps give some of you the courage you need to DIY :) Let me know if you find any errors in my instructions or if you have any questions.

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Looks Great. Thanks for the tutorial.
 

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2016 Crosstrek Limited
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Using these instructions to install STI spoiler this week. Excellent directions.
 
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