Applies to All Model Years Serviging brakes/rotors vs. replacing?

  1. Welcome to Subaru XV Crosstrek Forum – General discussion forum for the Subaru XV

    Welcome to Subaru XV Crosstrek Forum - a website dedicated to all things Subaru XV.

    You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, Join Subaru XV Crosstrek Forum today!
     
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
Like Tree5Likes

Thread: Serviging brakes/rotors vs. replacing?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    12

    Serviging brakes/rotors vs. replacing?

    we got a 2014 crosstrek with 70 K Km, I asked the mechanic to check on the brakes because it was squeeking and such. He said the pads life is still 50% and no need to replace.


    He said that he can service the brakes/rotors, but recommends just outright replacing it instead when the time comes. I have a feeling he may have said this because he doesn't want to perform the labour


    Would you guys service the brakes? I have attached some pictures. only the rear passenger rotor feels uneven when I touch the edge.

    https://imgur.com/a/Mt13Vit


    P.S. what does servicing the brake/rotors even mean and what does it do?





    UPDATE:


    So I contact another mechanic about brake service. He said:

    "we will remove excess rust, deglaze the brake pads, lubricate your sleeves and bushing."

    what is the benefit of this? it sounds like it could make my brakes response faster when i press on them??

  2. Remove Advertisements
    Subaru XV Forum
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    California
    Posts
    303
    service could mean turning the rotors so the surface is new for the new pads. vs replacing it with new rotors and pads.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

  4. #3
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,060
    Quote Originally Posted by black86 View Post
    service could mean turning the rotors so the surface is new for the new pads. vs replacing it with new rotors and pads.

    Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
    It might not even mean that...

    To me, servicing means that they will remove the associated components, inspect, lube the necessary parts, replace anything that is broken, and then re-assemble. He may resurface the rotors or he may not. You really can't say without asking the mechanic what exactly does he mean.

    Personally, if your existing pads are at 50%, there's no need to replace. Heck, it's been my experience that some mechanics underestimate/misquote the amount remaining to scare customers into replacing the pads early. I'm not saying that's is happening here.

    Do you know which wheel the squeaking and noise is coming from?

  5. Remove Advertisements
    Subaru XV Forum
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    54
    There's no point in resurfacing the rotors, most shops don't even do that anymore. It's usually not worth the effort. It's one of those things of the past that just isn't a thing anymore.

    Rotors are so cheap these days that you'd spend more on the labor of resurfacing them than you would buying new ones, and also if you try to resurface 5 year old rotors you might not end up with within the specs of the rotor thickness by the time they're resurfaced, so you'd have to buy new ones anyways, or buy new ones a year later when they needed to be replaced because they were too thin.

    The noise could be anything, squeaking is not something you are going to diagnose on a message board. It could be the brakes making noise, it could be the caliper, it could be the rotors, it could be the hub. It could be anything. If you really want to try to do something about it without doing a whole brake job you could have him / someone clean and lube everything like rlouie mentioned, and maybe that will be good enough to get you by for a while longer.

    Personally, after 5 years and 45-50K miles I would expect it's time to do a brake job with new pads and rotors, it might not be "needed" but I feel it would be time for new brakes. It's the most important system of your car so instead of "oh I can go another few years because they're not that bad", I'd be looking to get a fresh brake job that's new and safe for the next 5 years. That's the cost of owning a car. And yes, new pads and rotors at the same time, don't mix new with old.

    Good luck with whatever you do.

  7. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,060
    I'm not a big fan of replacing the factory rotors - I would rather get them resurfaced.

    The reason being is that most aftermarket rotors are questionable in terms of their quality as they have really become a commodity items for most vendors. You can buy a higher end name on the box but the rotor might be from the same supplier as the house brand one. The reutation of the quality of many of the lower end rotors is not that great as people have been reporting (not here mind you but on other auto forums) rotor warping issues relatively soon after they are installed especially in comparison with OEM.

    As far as them being out of spec after being resurfaced, if (and that's a big if) the mechanic knows what they are doing, have the proper equipment, using factory pads, and the rotor hasn't been turned before, even with a 5 year old rotor, you should be able to resurface them at least once and get a lot of use out of them before replacement. Factory pads don't wear on rotors that much so you should see little wear over those 5 years as long as nothing dumb has happened (ie a rock or something caused some deep damage to the surface).

  8. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by rlouie View Post
    It might not even mean that...

    To me, servicing means that they will remove the associated components, inspect, lube the necessary parts, replace anything that is broken, and then re-assemble. He may resurface the rotors or he may not. You really can't say without asking the mechanic what exactly does he mean.

    Personally, if your existing pads are at 50%, there's no need to replace. Heck, it's been my experience that some mechanics underestimate/misquote the amount remaining to scare customers into replacing the pads early. I'm not saying that's is happening here.

    Do you know which wheel the squeaking and noise is coming from?
    i think my rear passenger wheel is squeaking. it doesn't always do it tho.

  9. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    54
    rlouie, with that logic you can't use any aftermarket parts, for anything. Need a new blend door actuator? Subpar aftermarket quality, window regulator? wiper transmission? You said most aftermarket rotors, higher end brand name rotors, and lower end rotors all in the same sentence, they can't all be the same to make a blanket statement about.

    Don't want to argue the point but if you're paying $15 for a rotor then sure you might have a quality/material issue but most "brand name" aftermarket parts stores sell/manufacture quality rotors that meet or exceed oem specs.

    Rotor warping is a bit of a misnomer, you'd never actually be able to generate enough heat to warp a rotor. Issues of "warping" are caused by poor installation, bad pads, or other defects in the braking system that cause the rotor to not be rotating evenly/the pad hitting the rotor evenly.

    Anyways, it would be interesting to find out who manufactures the oem rotors, as I guarantee they sell them under different brands at those aftermarket stores.

    As far as resurfacing the rotors, you also make a huge assumption about the condition of imeem's rotors to suggest resurfacing. I don't know about you but I can't tell from his pictures how big that lip is on the edge and how worn they are. You have no idea how thick the rotors are to suggest that resurfacing them would be fine, and any mechanic that knew what they were doing with the lathe would tell him whether or not it's advisable to resurface or replace. You don't know how hard he has been braking for 5 years. The rotors could already be below the thickness threshold or be close to.

    Either way, the internet is not the place to get any answers. Must have a mechanic suggest the best course of action.

  10. #8
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,060
    Quote Originally Posted by imeem View Post
    i think my rear passenger wheel is squeaking. it doesn't always do it tho.
    If it's your rear passenger wheel, then you can just get that wheel serviced. You don't have to do all four wheels if you aren't replacing any parts.

  11. #9
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    8,060
    Quote Originally Posted by JustSubn View Post
    rlouie, with that logic you can't use any aftermarket parts, for anything. Need a new blend door actuator? Subpar aftermarket quality, window regulator? wiper transmission? You said most aftermarket rotors, higher end brand name rotors, and lower end rotors all in the same sentence, they can't all be the same to make a blanket statement about.

    Don't want to argue the point but if you're paying $15 for a rotor then sure you might have a quality/material issue but most "brand name" aftermarket parts stores sell/manufacture quality rotors that meet or exceed oem specs.

    Rotor warping is a bit of a misnomer, you'd never actually be able to generate enough heat to warp a rotor. Issues of "warping" are caused by poor installation, bad pads, or other defects in the braking system that cause the rotor to not be rotating evenly/the pad hitting the rotor evenly.

    Anyways, it would be interesting to find out who manufactures the oem rotors, as I guarantee they sell them under different brands at those aftermarket stores.

    As far as resurfacing the rotors, you also make a huge assumption about the condition of imeem's rotors to suggest resurfacing. I don't know about you but I can't tell from his pictures how big that lip is on the edge and how worn they are. You have no idea how thick the rotors are to suggest that resurfacing them would be fine, and any mechanic that knew what they were doing with the lathe would tell him whether or not it's advisable to resurface or replace. You don't know how hard he has been braking for 5 years. The rotors could already be below the thickness threshold or be close to.

    Either way, the internet is not the place to get any answers. Must have a mechanic suggest the best course of action.
    Before you get too worked up on the subject, you are reading a lot between the lines that I wrote. You are extending the information provided by a relatively simple part - a brake rotor with no moving parts or electrical components - to other much more complex components. It's been widely documented that basic rotors are now a commodity item with vendors slapping their name on something that they sourced from a 3rd party. The commodization of parts isn't necessarily a bad thing as it drives the price of these products downward. Very few parts vendors now make their own basic rotors these days as it's cheaper to source them from a 3rd party, repackage under their own name, and then resell it. As for the price, that's up to parts vendors as no-one said that one company can't charge more than another just because they have a better name.

    Subaru (at least the ones made in Japan) sources all of their parts from Japanese suppliers as does most Japanese auto makers. The original manufacturer of the rotor probably does sell them under their own branding or even multiple brands but chances are you'll only find them in Japan - just like how something like the original oil filter is no longer available in North America at the retail level.

    If you read my reply carefully, I didn't not suggest that the OP's rotor needed resurfacing - in fact, I don't believe anyone suggested resurfacing the OP's rotor at all but just commented that might be included in the mechanic's 'service' request. I was commenting on how I prefer resurfacing over replacing and how a good mechanic that knows how to do the work should be able to properly resurface a rotor without too much trouble.

  12. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    SEA
    Posts
    259
    Intermittent Squeaking just need typical clean and lube service

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Source for cross drilled/ slotted rotors?
    By GT-Tom in forum Suspension and Brakes
    Replies: 36
    Latest Post: 12-21-2018, 02:12 PM
  2. ['12-'17] replacing brakes and rotors for $400
    By baloneymaloney in forum Dealer Service Problems, Maintenance, Warranty, TSBs, and Recalls
    Replies: 21
    Latest Post: 07-30-2018, 05:13 PM
  3. ['18+] Pumping brakes while engine is running, brakes turn hard question.
    By HoboBonobo in forum Suspension and Brakes
    Replies: 4
    Latest Post: 03-22-2018, 06:52 PM
  4. Cross & Slotted drilled rotors on 14' XV Crosstrek Installed
    By D R E W in forum Suspension and Brakes
    Replies: 16
    Latest Post: 08-17-2014, 07:22 PM
  5. will 16" wheels clear rotors and calipers on a 2014?
    By heejshin in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Latest Post: 01-29-2014, 11:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v4.1.2